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Fate to Sail ? Surviving "Lotsageddon"

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posted on May, 5 2010 @ 04:36 AM
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One matter seems apparant in our future, and that is the globalization of the new world order setting itself in place. I'll start by pointing out that that's not the topic of this thread, only the catalyst. With talk of economic collapse, nanotech in supermarkets, oppressive taxes, surveillance and all other manner of disaster looming, more and more people feel their backs pressed to the wall, and many have had enough for years. So what is a person to do? A short essay by Ray Jason entitled How to Sail away from Lotsageddon was published March 26th. It is packed to the gills with inspiration and some practical information for those who may want to consider themselves up to the task of sailing away to international waters, to avoid the spectre of big government. Since we have the time to prepare, it's never too late to cash in those stocks, put the house up for sale, and look into a brand new lifestyle. Does early retirement really sound that bad in light of modern day problems?

Perhaps there are some able-bodied ATSer's who might be drafted to work aboard your ship too. How about rescue operations of your family and friends if things get too bad overland in future years? Last I heard there were still uninhabited islands in the pacific; the thirty-thousand islands in the great lakes; Just avoid Somolia and the Bermuda triangle!


Self-reliance at sea

Sea gypsies are probably the most self-reliant people in the civilized world because when crossing oceans, there are no hardware stores, diesel repair shops or hospitals to turn to for help. Because of this need for self-sufficiency, sailboats have used highly sophisticated survival systems for decades. Reverse-osmosis water-makers that convert salt water into tasty fresh water were perfected many years ago. Sailing vessels have generated electricity by using wind turbines and solar panels for at least 20 years. Ham radio and single-sideband frequencies provide communication links that are far less fragile than the systems that landsmen typically use. All of these systems have been tested and fine-tuned and work brilliantly.

Because of our need to fend for ourselves when far from land, most sailors abide by the “hope for the best but prepare for the worst” philosophy. In my case this outlook spills over into my general worldview. Indeed, I hope that I am just a “Collapsachondriac” and that my concerns for the future prove to be wrong, but I have prepared for the worst, and now I will share that knowledge with you.


www.culturechange.org...

The First essay, Ray Jason
www.culturechange.org...




posted on May, 5 2010 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by Northwarden
 


Check out the Seasteading Institute


I love the ideas of micronatons, and artificial islands:

The problem is building them so that they could handle the open seas.



posted on May, 5 2010 @ 12:52 PM
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Wouldn't That be swell. It remind me of the floating cottages along the St. Lawrence, although it appears that island is permanent. I think the mobility of a sailcraft offers some real possibilities in the face of future dangers though. Not only would it still be allowed, you'd blend right in! The very rich will be sailing all the time.



posted on May, 8 2010 @ 04:38 AM
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I wouldn't feel comfortable doing it unless my vessel had a serious area for growing vegetables. But that would be massively challenging. Water conservation, and protection from sea salt would be the biggest problems. You'd need a huge green house made from expensive polycarbonate panels.

One idea I had was to get a big barge, and build up several stories with the top floor being the sealed in green house. But a number of problems begin, such as how will the barge handle the open seas, how can it still have a sail without a massive telescopic mast that would cost booku bucks. And to live out a full life you'd be a complete set of extra polycarbonate panels, sails, and other key items.

I still see a lot of 'fun' with the Waterworld ideas and hope to see more discussion in here about it.



posted on May, 8 2010 @ 05:03 PM
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Hmm ... a barge wouldn't be too seaworthy, but it could hold all the accomodations of a lifestyle well. In a cove or a bay it could work out well. Anchoring it isn't the conern, it would be a solid moored vessel. Rather slow though. The desalination technology has been perfected, so water doesn't need to be a concern. It's always been a curiosity as to why fresh water is a problem considering this is in place - such as in megalopolises that have to drill deeper and deeper for it. I just write it off to "not a money-maker" and government oversight however.



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 01:03 AM
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reply to post by Northwarden
 


I love the idea of sailing away. In fact, my friend and I have already made the plans that if we survive long enough to make enough money, we will be getting a house boat and making for the ocean.

Either way, regardless of if SHTF in our lifetimes or not, I couldn't imagine being secluded to the land my entire life without experiencing the freedom of the open seas. Having lived inland my whole life with the yearly trips to the ocean, I find myself longing for the sea and its infinite expanse. To me, the emptiness of the ocean is the last place on Earth where you can feel true freedom and be away from the cluttered mess that mankind has become.

Let it be known that if anyone on ATS decides to go through with this, I am indeed an able bodied sea hand and will work my heart away if only for daily rations and a place to lay my head at night. As long as I get the water beneath my feet and the freedom of the winds to guide me, I'll be the happiest man alive.



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


A houseboat, that seems like a very sound plan too


It seems such a standardized routine to work away at a job, take out a mortgage, and then buy a house, or land to build a house. That's fine if you have kids, and need that location stability. Otherwise, what's stopping anyone from sailing who has reasonable assets and a good knowledge-base about living off the grid? Adventurousness would develop over time, and it's still a roof over your head.

Slip costs are pricey though, perhaps there are better ways to circumvent them. I have a friend in town who took his boat ashore late fall and winter, parked it on a friends property (& paid hydro) to live on his boat for over a year.

Chained to a mortgage has never been my plan; far better to afford what you can as you go. Camping is another good thing to consider for savings - rent is always such an expense, and not having that expense allows for goals to happen. It's fine conditioning, and you learn to like the rain
What seemed impossible to do before becomes very realistic after a couple months in the woods.




[edit on 10-5-2010 by Northwarden]



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 04:01 PM
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Wouldnt it prove a whole lot simpler and more economicly viable to simply find a remote island that no one cares about, drop anchor and live out your days there?

Dry land is always handy for things like food, long term shelter, riding out storms. Then you still have your boat handy and ship shape should you feel the need or desire to leave.

The boat idea sounds "fun", but for long term survival, having a place to grow food, and not worry about sinking, makes a whole lot more sense to me.

Oh, for those going on the boats, be sure to stock up on your citrus items and plants, scurvy is no way to go.



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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How true, but how are you going to find that island?


If one finds a really good island, I suppose a commune could start, hopefully not Survivor-style (what a brainwash), or Lord of the Flies, rather, a responsible and caring community. Then I suppose you'd only need one or two boats too!



posted on May, 10 2010 @ 10:09 PM
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It would be grand to find an island to make birth. The world seems to covered right now with people, however, that the ability to find a usuable island that isn't owned my some rich fools or cruise corporations (or drug cartels) would be next to impossible.

It would be a grand thing to do but it just seems near impossible in the modern world.



posted on May, 11 2010 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by gwydionblack
It would be grand to find an island to make birth. The world seems to covered right now with people, however, that the ability to find a usuable island that isn't owned my some rich fools or cruise corporations (or drug cartels) would be next to impossible.

It would be a grand thing to do but it just seems near impossible in the modern world.


This thread is about creating a boat to last forever at sea. Not exactly a simple concept or undertaking. Something tells me that if you are that committed to put in the time, energy, resources, and money to build a boat or flotilla, you should be able to find a chunk of land. Just a thought.

As for my "house boat" plans. I have a nice chunk of terra firma almost impossible to get to, and a canoe hidden on a remote river that hasnt seen a person, save me, in many many years.



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