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Genetically Engineered Human Hybrids: A compilation guide

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posted on May, 27 2004 @ 12:40 PM
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I can only guess as to how long these twisted experiments have gone on in deep secret government labs guarded by alligator men with ak47s slung over their scaly shoulders.
I have even heard tell of successful hybridization somewhere in the Southeastern US as well as Japan concerning a human/chimp creation. So I did some digging and found the following. Although I was not able to find any links to the really juicy, secret stuff, we can see the direction that this has the possibility of going. Enjoy and feel free to add anything not already posted as I find this all quite interesting.



Cloning laws in Japan to allow human-animal mix

Japan says it will allow combined human-animal embryos to be produced through cloning. Ministers hope the move will lead to transplant organs being produced in specially-bred animals. Opponents worry that scientists will now be able to produce mixed-species creatures.

Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, who chairs the government's council for science and technology policy, announced the decision. It means the implanting of human cells into fertilized animal eggs for medical purposes will be allowed. But the Daily Yomiuri reports that human cloning will be illegal under the guidelines.

www.ananova.com...




PATENT REQUEST ON HUMAN-ANIMAL HYBRIDS

Stuart A. Newman, a cellular biologist at New York Medical College in Valhalla has applied for a patent on a method for making creatures that are part human and part animal, as well as a patent on the creatures themselves. Although Newman has not created such creatures and says he never intends to, he submitted the patent application in order to ignite debate in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on the controversial practice of allowing patents on living creatures.

The patent office has awarded several patents on animals with minor human components, including laboratory mice engineered with human cancer genes or human immune-system cells. Newman's application is for a technique in which human embryo cells would be mixed with embryo cells from a monkey, ape or other animal. Ethicists note that the debate on the issue would centre around what is means to be human, and would lead to questions such as what percentage of a creature would have to be human to preclude slavery-type ownership.

Of greatest concern in today's coverage of the issue in The Washington Post is that this experimentation would be legal if done using private money, since the only prohibition involving research on human embryos has to do with the use of federal funding.

www.lifesite.net...




Man-beast hybrid beyond talking stage - Human DNA in cow egg

The first publicized case of animal-human hybrids took place in 1996 when Jose Cibelli, a scientist at the University of Massachusetts, took DNA from his white blood cells by swabbing the inside of his cheek. He then inserted the DNA sample into a hollowed-out cow egg.

Cibelli's experiment came to an end after a week of growing the cell mass, he told scientists earlier this month at a panel meeting of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. This raised the question of what might have emerged had the cell mass continued to develop.

"As far as we know, it would still look like a human being, but some of the characteristics of individual cells might be slightly different," said James Cross, a molecular biologist at the University of Calgary who attended the meeting. If such an embryo could develop, he said, the result would resemble a human being but carry bovine mitochondria, the energy-producing component of every cell. This is because the cow's egg shell, or cytoplasm, contains genetic materials known as mitochondrial DNA.

"This suggests that we can create new human-animal species," said Jeremy Rifkin, biotechnology critic and president of the Washington-based Foundation on Economic Trends. Rifkin called the experiment "the most extraordinary single development in the history of biotechnology."

Such experiments have become public only when the makers of hybrids, who fund their operations through investor capital, apply to patent their inventions. In partnership with Massachusetts-based Advanced Cell Technology, Cibelli came out from under a shroud of secrecy in 1998 when the firm applied to patent the alleged invention.

More: www.freerepublic.com...




Cloning Yields Human-Rabbit Hybrid Embryo

Scientists in China have, for the first time, used cloning techniques to create hybrid embryos that contain a mix of DNA from both humans and rabbits, according to a report in a scientific journal that has reignited the smoldering ethics debate over cloning research.

More than 100 of the hybrids, made by fusing human skin cells with rabbit eggs, were allowed to develop in laboratory dishes for several days before the scientists destroyed them to retrieve so-called embryonic stem cells from their interiors. Although scientists in Massachusetts had previously mixed human cells and cow eggs in a similar attempt to make hybrid embryos as a source of stem cells, those experiments were not successful.

The team said it retrieved foreskin tissue from two 5-year-old boys and two men, and facial tissue from a 60-year-old woman, as a source of skin cells. They fused those cells with New Zealand rabbit eggs from which the vast majority of rabbit DNA had been removed. More than 400 of those new, fused entities grew into early embryos, and more than 100 survived to the blastocyst stage—the point at which coveted stem cells begin to form.

More: www.mindfully.org...




Pig-human chimeras contain cell surprise

Pigs grown from fetuses into which human stem cells were injected have surprised scientists by having cells in which the DNA from the two species is mixed at the most intimate level.

The hybrid cells had both human and pig surface markers. But, most surprisingly, the hybrid cell nuclei were found to have chromosomal DNA that contained both human and pig genes. The researchers found that about 60 per cent of the animals' non-pig cells were hybrids, with the remainder being fully human.

Importantly, the team also found that porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), which is present in almost all pigs, was also present in the hybrid cells. Previous laboratory work has shown that while PERVs in pig cells cannot infect human cells, those in hybrid cells can. The discovery therefore suggests a serious potential problem for xenotransplantation.

More: www.newscientist.com...

A shocking story hit the news wires last month stating that two research firms were seeking a patent for their process which produced a "human-pig" hybrid embryo. Even though the researchers denied that the embryos were a hybrid, they did admit that pig cells were infused with human DNA and allowed to grow through cell division into 32 cells over the period of a week.[2] This technique, known as "nuclear transfer," has already proven to be successful in producing clones like the sheep, Dolly.

Greenpeace was the first organization to complain about the experiment, but for different reasons than those for which pro-lifers might object. Greenpeace was concerned that researchers not be allowed to patent and claim ownership of "human" life. While loopholes in European Union and Canadian laws may permit such patents to be granted, Greenpeace representatives said, "Society should not reward these Frankenstein scientists with patents."

More: www.khouse.org...




SCIENTISTS CONSIDER CREATING A HUMAN-MOUSE HYBRID

Scientist says if process goes awry it could be "too horrible to contemplate."

SAN FRANCISCO, November 28, 2002 (LifeSiteNews.com) - A group of American and Canadian scientists are considering whether to create a human-mouse hybrid with which to advance stem cell technology aimed at curing diseases. The researchers want to test various lines of human cells by injecting them into a living animal. "For ethical reasons," the New York Times explained, "the test cannot be performed on people."

However, the result would be what scientists call "chimeras" - organisms that are mixtures of two kinds of cells -- with human cells blended into their body. Though the creatures would most likely turn out to be mice with a few human cells, and could be "an enormously important experiment," says Dr. Irving L. Weissman of Stanford University, if the process goes awry it could be "too horrible to contemplate."

www.lifesite.net...


And of course there was Oliver the humanzee, but that was proven to be a natural, although strange, occurance.



Over the past Century several walking, breathing and more "human" than animal beings have lived among the Human Race, functioned in Human behavior patterns, and had the physical appearance of Homo sapiens, although it is not known for certain if in fact they were pure "animal" or a combination of Human/Animal.

OLIVER:
One example was "Oliver." He was captured in the African Congo in the early 1970s along with several Primates and sold to animal trainers in South America. It was apparent from the very beginning that "Oliver" was not your ordinary Chimp. When captured, he had no hair on his chest, or his head. His other physical features included ears and a jawline, more typical of Man. But, the most amazing feature of "Oliver" was his decided CHOICE to walk totally upright, with a definite human gait. His intelligence made him able to learn to do what we do... he watched television, used the bathroom "facilities" even learned to feed the trainer's family dog. Two of his favorite beverages included beer and coffee. In fact? He was known to go to the kitchen, on his own, pour himself a cup of coffee and then return to watching television. His preference was to be with people, not Primates.

More: www.mysticaluniverse.com...



[Edited on 27-5-2004 by Jonna]

[Edited on 27-5-2004 by Jonna]




posted on May, 27 2004 @ 01:53 PM
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Now this is just plain bizzare!



Tree-Human DNA hybrids?

A SCHEME by two London artists to take DNA from a dead person and insert it into apple trees to create a living memorial of that individual's "biological essence" has run headlong into problems. Royal College of Art graduates Georg Tremmel and Shiho Fukuhara want to insert a stretch of genetic material from a dead loved-one into the genome of an apple tree. Their symbolic goal: every cell in the tree will have a genetic echo of that person, and the heritage will be handed on forever in the tree's fruit.

Tremmel's and Fukuhara's idea has proven so successful that Britain's National Endowment for Science Technology and the Arts (NESTA) has earmarked 35,000 pounds to help the duo's company, Biopresence, get off the ground. Their goal is to market the engineered trees at 20,000 pounds each. Not so fast, the weekly magazine New Scientist reports in its next edition, published on Saturday. Problem No. 1 has been technical.

The two artists have had to water down their original proposal, which was to insert a uniquely individual sequence of "junk" human DNA into the tree's genome. Junk DNA is so called because it is part of the genetic code that does not control proteins. But, fearing ethical and safety objections, the pair have now backed off, and have decided instead to embed a coded version of a human DNA sequence into an apple gene -- but without changing the gene's length or the protein that it controls.

More: www.wytchesweb.net...

And also at: www.theaustralian.news.com.au...



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 02:20 PM
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UK hybrid loophole exposed (June 2nd 2004)

The United Kingdom's Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has asked the government to clarify what the authority's role is in regulating experiments involving human–animal hybrids, an area of research that currently slips through a loophole in British law.

The HFEA works within a legal remit that limits its power to regulate some experiments in which human and animal materials are fused. The agency wants the anomaly cleared up when the 1990 Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act is reviewed, an HFEA spokeswoman told The Scientist. "We've asked the government to consider this part of the legislation again," she said. "What we need is clarification of where everybody stands and what HFEA should and shouldn't be licensing."

The gap in the act was highlighted in a story in Monday's (May 31) edition of The Times newspaper, which said that Suzi Leather, chair of the HFEA, had confirmed that an animal–human experiment conducted at Cambridge University last year did not require an HFEA license.

The Cambridge team fused the nuclei of adult human cells with frog eggs, with the aim of producing stem cells. Leather said in two letters to Calum MacKellar, director of research at the Scottish Council on Human Bioethics, that the study did not need a license.

More: www.biomedcentral.com...



posted on Jun, 23 2004 @ 09:22 PM
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This could be really beneficial if the scientists could put just enough "human" into an animal egg to get it to produce human stem cells animal eggs instead of genuine human eggs could be used to harvest stem cells.



posted on Jun, 23 2004 @ 11:41 PM
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There was a documentary special on OLIVER... just a month or so ago. He finaly recieved his DNA test and was found to be a primate.



posted on Jun, 24 2004 @ 12:01 AM
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OLIVER:
One example was "Oliver." He was captured in the African Congo in the early 1970s along with several Primates and sold to animal trainers in South America. It was apparent from the very beginning that "Oliver" was not your ordinary Chimp. When captured, he had no hair on his chest, or his head. His other physical features included ears and a jawline, more typical of Man. But, the most amazing feature of "Oliver" was his decided CHOICE to walk totally upright, with a definite human gait. His intelligence made him able to learn to do what we do... he watched television, used the bathroom "facilities" even learned to feed the trainer's family dog. Two of his favorite beverages included beer and coffee. In fact? He was known to go to the kitchen, on his own, pour himself a cup of coffee and then return to watching television. His preference was to be with people, not Primates.

More: www.mysticaluniverse.com...


Erm, wth, I heard about Scotts and Aussi peeps shagging sheep, but a chimp? :@

Could it be he came to existence because of someone rapping a chimp? Or do you think this is more a lab experiment?



posted on Jun, 24 2004 @ 02:16 AM
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IF we really are highly evolved animals, as modern science contends, why the controversy? Of course, there will always be religious opposition to Human/Animal hybrids (and evolution), but it seems there is controversy even in the non-religious communities.

If mankind can benefit from using animals, why shouldn't we? Most Judeo-Christians believe the animals are here for our use. We eat them, we make clothes from them, we make them do work for us, we already use them medically, what's the next step?


Bring it on.


--J1m



posted on Jun, 24 2004 @ 10:05 AM
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Originally posted by Just1Man
If mankind can benefit from using animals, why shouldn't we? Most Judeo-Christians believe the animals are here for our use. We eat them, we make clothes from them, we make them do work for us, we already use them medically, what's the next step?


Exactly! The argument against seems to be not so much about the animals welfare, but rather about some sort of corruption of the human soul/spirit/purity. That we would be corupting or lowering ourselves to the level of 'dumb beasts'. Now while the only conceivable use for a cow-boy servant is fresh milk in your morning coffee, there are a myriad of various species traits that would be most beneficial being that human sensory functions appear to be a grouping of the weakest in any animal and yes we are animals regardless of our bloated egos. We are the most intelligent animal, but because of that our physical trait advantages have become weak and unused because they were not needed due to the invention of tools. We have come to the point in our history where we have the technology and the knowledge to shape our own evolution and I for one am all for it.

Note: I understand that this experimentation is stem-cell centered at the moment, but I am taking the technology to its next forseeable step however futureistic it might seem.



posted on Jun, 25 2004 @ 12:20 AM
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I think they are more worried about "how human" it would be... where is the cut off between labour animal and human.. how many genes and chromozones is justifiable.. etc



posted on Jun, 25 2004 @ 02:19 AM
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If you raise it in a "first world nation," and it decides to wear clothes during it's adult life, it's human. ;-) Yeah, probably not the best indication, I'd say something to do with testing self awareness.

Still, everything should get at least animal rights, which can prevent a lot of abuses.

Any thoughts on a good "human" test? I think it would have to go beyond simple physiology, tho. . .

--J1m



posted on Jun, 25 2004 @ 02:24 AM
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Self awareness
Cognative abilities
Social Structure
Speech

this would make a good percentage of the animal kingdon "human"




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