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Fla. man says Home Depot fired him over God button

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posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 04:46 PM
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Hey alyosha.

I don't feel strongly one way or the other about it, I feel people have the right to freedom of speech, but at the same time this does not surprise me.




posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 04:56 PM
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Well, I will say it is their right to have this policy and the man broke the rules. It is a private business and he needs to understand the rules he agreed to abide by as an employee of a private establishment.

On that note, I would hate to offend anyone by spending my money at Home Depot from now on due to the fact my cash reads 'In God We Trust.' Therefore, in the name of political correctness, tolerance, and respect, I will keep my religious cash out of their store.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 05:14 PM
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Originally posted by alyosha1981


No respect for "One nation under God, indivisible" anymore, this is a shame and shows another example of how the core beliefs of this country are being dismantled piece by piece, person by person. I mean this is in the pledge! and this man was fired for wearing it on a button at work...wth? What's next getting fined for having a American flag outside your house? This is terrible, just terrible.



"Under God," was not added to the pledge until 1954...

Home Depot made a decision upon policy and they enforced that particular policy. Having workers wearing religious markings could be problematic for some customers. Also, if workers are allowed to were to wear religious markings; where do you draw the line? Is it fine for Wiccans to wear a button with the pentagram on it?

I think it's safe to say that Home Depot took the best way out by saying that none of their employees will wear religious markings while working. I just hope the stand by their decision. To give in would just create more problems.



posted on Oct, 28 2009 @ 06:08 PM
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Whatever.....


My opinion, is that Freedom of Religion means that anybody, can practice any religion they so choose. It also means that God should not be a part of anything that represents the nation.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 08:46 AM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Originally posted by AshleyD
Therefore, in the name of political correctness, tolerance, and respect, I will keep my religious cash out of their store.


And in my opinion that's exactly the way it ought to work. Businesses make a policy. Employees have the right to not work there if it offends them. Customers have a right to shop elsewhere if they disagree. If it starts hurting the business's bottom-line, the policy gets changed.

Publicly traded businesses exist for one reason - to make a profit. Everything else is secondary to that. Their policy about buttons I'm sure is to take the simplest route: rather than have a separate ruling for every piece of personal "flair" someone wants to wear, you eliminate all of it but the officially approved and supplied. They don't want to be in the button approval business, they want to be in the selling home improvement stuff business. Employees are representing the company on company time. Everything they say, do, and wear reflects back upon the company. If they let Darrell wear his God and Country button, they have to let Phil wear his NAMBLA button unless there's a specific policy about NAMBLA buttons. Way too unwieldy. So it's if it ain't ours, you can't wear it.

And here's an open secret about mega corporations. They all have an employee handbook and other sources of rules and regulations. It's nearly impossible to comply with every tiny rule and reg a company has. In fact, it can be counterproductive. They do that for a reason. If they need to axe somebody, they can literally always find some obscure rule being broken to justify it.

Back in the olden days
when I worked for MegaMammoth Corp (name changed to protect nothing in particular) and contract time was coming around, we had a thing called, "work to the rule". That meant we followed every policy and regulation to the letter. Which of course brought productivity down to almost -0- since on a daily basis everyone had to take little shortcuts to get done what was required. Yes, in a huge corporate environment, you're faced with every conceivable roadblock put there by the company that must be surmounted in order to do what the company requires you to do. Which is why most people hate working for huge corporations.

Madness.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 08:56 AM
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For argument's sake, I would be curious to know if Home Depot employees are prohibited from wearing cross necklaces or Hijibs?

In my workplace, they are not, as that would be termed religious discrimination. It's crazy because image is 90% of our job and yet we don't prohibit that, no matter how inappropriate it looks.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 09:12 AM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


reply to post by kosmicjack
 


Good question. According to the linked story, the issue here is wearing a non-official button on the apron. I guess we'll need to see if someone gets canned for wearing a little cross necklace.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 09:14 AM
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reply to post by alyosha1981
 


This is real simple though. They said don't wear anything not approved by the company. He did. They offered him something approved he said no. It's not about free speech or anything. He didn't follow the rule of company approved only buttons so they let him go. I don't see anything sinister here was just reading this on Yahoo.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 09:25 AM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 


I don't see how a policy stating no religious anything is religious discrimination. If buttons will offend others then jewelry will as well. You're at work not a place of worship. Your religion has nothing to do with your ability to work and nothing to do with discrimination. At work, you should be...working.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 09:26 AM
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reply to post by yeahright
 



And in my opinion that's exactly the way it ought to work. Businesses make a policy. Employees have the right to not work there if it offends them. Customers have a right to shop elsewhere if they disagree. If it starts hurting the business's bottom-line, the policy gets changed.


Yup!


Far be it from any of us to demand how a private business runs itself or governs its employees. It is their right and the employee's decision whether or not to work at said establishment. It is also our right to not shop there based on our disagreement. Win-win.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 09:36 AM
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reply to post by mkross1983
 


I agree. I'm just wondering where the line is drawn.

If I don't hire someone because they wear a Hijib which might be contrary to the stylish image I want my employees to project, then am I not discriminating on the basis of the Hijib? Which will have a disparate impact on people of a certain religion, the result is discrimination against their religion by proxy.

What about tattoos? What if the employee in the OP had the button message tattooed on his forearm?

It's a slippery slope for sure. I deal with it all of the time.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 09:36 AM
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Yeah, he didn't follow rules, so he deserved it.

I think if you wear a personal pin on a company apron customers may get the impression that the message on the pin is an official message from the company itself. That could be bad for the company. That explains why they offered for him to wear a company approved pin.

Wearing a necklace with a cross is a different issue because the necklace is around your neck, and not directly linked to a company uniform. This sends a message that the necklace is the opinion of the person, and not the company.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 09:44 AM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 


Ok, I see what you're saying. Well if they're wearing something religious to an interview you can simply state company policy does not allow for religious items to be worn while at work. I would think that would be fine, it's not discrimination but a company wide policy, if they don't like it they don't have to work their.

For tattoos when I worked at McDonalds when I was 16 (just under 10 years ago now) which is the only place I've encountered this really, all tattoos had to be covered up with long sleeve shirts, or they could not otherwise be visible. I know some people did not get hired because they could not "hide" the tattoos from the public.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 10:01 AM
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I wish I had a god button. I would press it all the time.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 11:38 AM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 


If a person had a tattoo at the interview, they probably wouldn't get the job, if the tattoo was acquired after being hired, said person would be told to either cover it with long sleeves (which would suck, working in Florida), or be terminated. Most companies, especially those with face to face customer interaction, have rules about visible tattoos.

reply to post by yeahright
 


It's not just huge corporations. I work for a small company with a main shop, a secondary shop, and a shop that a customer owns, but we maintain and control it. The company employs less than 200 people. While I was supervisor, I learned that there are so many ways a company can terminate an employee, without repercussions. Legally, without unemployment. Worst thing is, on a daily basis, most every employee breaks at least one of the rules. There's even a rule about not working for a family member, that has been broken at least twice when my department manager hired 1) his son, 2) his brother, and he also gave his daughter's boyfriend a job.


Back on topic. I'm an atheist, I could care less what religion each person is, as long as it's not forced on me. I don't force my beliefs on anybody. I don't really see a problem with somebody even wearing a button that says "I Love Allah", but if the company says no, then that's the rule.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 11:42 AM
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God isn't American, when will Americans realize that?

It's so arrogant that Americans say "One nation under God, indivisible" or "God bless America". I don't freaking think so, F you! If he created everything, what makes you so special? Nothing, so stop sucking up to something that wasn't even devised by you.

[edit on 29-10-2009 by Tomis_Nexis]



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 01:21 PM
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He wasn't fired because of his button. If he's been wearing it for a year that isn't the problem, or he would have been fired sooner. Read the article. I came to the conclusion he was fired for bringing a bible to work at lunch. It doesn't make sense otherwise.

It has nothing to do with patriotism, or loving America. He brought a bible to work and no one likes it so they fired him. THAT is the ridiculous part.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 01:39 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


reply to post by fbnks
 


I think you're assuming facts not in evidence. It's entirely possible that wearing the button fell below the radar. No one complained, so it wasn't addressed. If I'm going to speculate, I'll guess either someone finally complained, or someone forced the issue by sprouting something over the top offensive and was told to stop it. Once that happens, you need a crackdown on everyone for fear of accusation of singling someone out. You know how it works, many infractions are ignored until someone takes it too far. At that point, it's clampdown for everyone. He had the choice to comply and refused. That's why he was fired.

Personally, I think that's a much more likely scenario than thinking he was fired for reading a Bible on his break or lunch.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 01:45 PM
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Just an outside point of view here, but I think that the religion issue might be what pulls this country apart. Just look at the posts here when something regarding religion comes up. And there's been more religious based topics in the news lately. It's usually Christianity under attack in most cases, and doesn't that religion make up most of the American population? The next civil war won't be fought over politics, I think it will be fought over religion.



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 01:56 PM
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Originally posted by alyosha1981
It's a shame when the policy of a company goes to this length to avoid legal liability, this quote is in the pledge and last I checked The Home Depot is an American company.


It's not a shame when a company does anything to avoid legal liability.... what you are saying is that it's a shame when a company does something to RESPECT THE LAW...

Honestly though... they didn't do this to avoid legal liability, but make Home Depot a religious free zone so all who shop there will feel comfortable...

Home Depot == Company... not Country...




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