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Mac Tonnies Dies

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posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 10:48 AM
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Mac Tonnies was found in his apartment on October 22, 2009, what a tremenous loss.

Biographical sketch:
I'm a Kansas City, Missouri-based author and essayist. I blog daily at Posthuman Blues and tweet religiously. My latest book is After the Martian Apocalypse (Paraview Pocket Books, 2004), a speculative and generally well-received examination of extraterrestrial intelligence on the Red Planet. I'm presently at work on a new non-fiction book titled The Cryptoterrestrials: Indigenous Humanoids and the Aliens Among Us, excerpts of which I've posted on my blog. If you're in the mood for a multiplex Fortean anthology, my essay "The Ancients Are Watching" is included in 2008's Darklore Vol. II. (My first book, Illumined Black, is a collection of naively "Blade Runner"-ish science fiction short-stories. It can still be found in used-book stores and on Amazon.com.)


www.mactonnies.com...


Nick just called to tell me that our friend and colleague Mac Tonnies was found in his apartment this (Thursday) afternoon, apparently dead of natural causes. There was no evidence of foul play or suicide according to a close friend.

It is hard to find the right words to describe my feelings at this moment.

The last time we talked was just after his appearance on Coast To Coast on September 28th. He asked if I thought he had done a good job. I said he hit one over the fence. Tentatively, I asked if he would consider collaborating on a fiction project, and he liked the idea. Now, I don’t really know what to do or say.

The manuscript of Mac’s last book was apparently complete and ready to be delivered to the publisher.


www.ufomystic.com...



[edit on 23-10-2009 by Aquarius1]




posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 10:52 AM
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From an interview on C2C September 28, 2009
Alien Hypotheses
Author, blogger and Fortean researcher Mac Tonnies argued that the ET hypothesis (that aliens are visiting our world from other star systems) is somewhat of an outmoded concept, and the truth may be stranger than we can imagine, involving a myriad of overlapping explanations. The notion of parallel worlds has gained credence in the scientific world, and the aliens could represent a kind of symbiosis with beings from another dimension, he noted. The so-called ETs could be a species of intelligent non-humans, or "Cryptoterrestrials" (the title of his forthcoming book) who covertly share our planet with us. Because aliens are typically described as a bipedal and human-like species, it suggests to him they have developed here on Earth.

Yet, the prototypical alien-- the spindly, big headed 'grey,' has the physique to be an ideal astronaut with few physical requirements-- perhaps they were designed for space travel, Tonnies commented. Cultural associations also influence how the aliens are perceived. In Zimbabwe for instance, entities wearing silvery suits associated with metallic craft have been described as the "ghosts of ancestors," he detailed. Regarding the alien's reported hybridization program, we could be dealing with something beyond the understanding of our neurological hard-wiring, he said.


www.coasttocoastam.com...



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 10:55 AM
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I'm shocked. This is incredibly unexpected, he was a young guy.

My condolences to his family and friends.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by converge
 

I was also shocked, I did not hear his last interview but think I may give it a listen, normally don't listen to Coast during the week....my sincere condolences to his family and many friends.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 11:10 AM
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While Mac focused most of his work on the crypoterrestrial angle, something I didn't follow that much, I was aware of Mac through Greg Bishop, and from the interviews I heard and his written material I read, Mac came across as an intelligent and open minded individual with very pertinent and interesting ideas to offer.

From that perspective, the field of study of strange phenomena suffered a significant loss.

Mac Tonnies was 34 years old - way to early for anyone to die regardless of the area of expertise or work.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by converge
 


I knew he was young but not that young, very sad indeed, at 34 years old your life is just beginning, he has accomplished a lot for the short time her was here..



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 12:13 PM
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Originally posted by converge
Mac Tonnies was 34 years old - way to early for anyone to die regardless of the area of expertise or work.


And something that seems to be happening more and more. Or perhaps I am just noticing it more, being that I am very near that age.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 01:07 PM
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Here's what Jeremy Vaeni of Paratopia and UFO Magazine had to say this morning:


Rest In Peace, Mac Tonnies
At age 34, writer, Fortean thinker, and all around decent human being Mac Tonnies has passed away. Mac is best known in ufology as a proponent of the cryptoterrestrial theory--that is, the theory that the intelligences we call "aliens" or "visitors" are neither. They live along side of us pretending to be those things, camouflaging themselves in our expectations and surviving the human advancement.

I always liked Mac. I won't say we were great friends but I'll bet we would have been if we'd lived closer to each other. He always struck me as a fish out of water: sharp guy into alternative things struggling to get by with a crap job in a small town. I urged him to move to New York where he'd be appreciated but he just didn't have the funds. (I also practically begged him to write for UFO Magazine until he thankfully caved!)

His untimely death is that jarring reminder of all our mortality but to me it's something else too. Mac had just completed his new book. He'd just gone on Coast To Coast for the first time. He earned the respect of those who paid attention to his work and was on his way to breaking out of obscurity. For the public at large, that would have meant a refreshing, intellectually honest and level voice in a field where such is nearly extinct. For Mac, that might have meant an end to the financial struggle and the personal struggle to be heard above the droning noise churning from the stagnant minds around him.

New directions for him. New directions for us. Greater freedom for all.

Gone.

Gone but not forgotten. Remembered for what he gave us. Remembered for where he was bringing us. His is the story of a man with his whole future ahead of him and not distantly so. No, right at his fingertips, actually. He was an artistic thinker, arguably poetic, and this is the fitting ending to that general story, tragic though it is for those of us who knew and appreciated Mac and for those who loved him.

On that note, my heartfelt condolensces to Mac's family and his good friends, Greg Bishop and Paul Kimball. Mac has passed into that good night but you know better than the rest of us he was a man with a flashlight. Wherever he is now, take comfort that he's doing just fine.

Love ya, Mac. Rest well.

Source


This just kills me. Never was there ever a cooler or nicer guy to have on a show. He brought wit, class and a very warm, human heart. What a blow to our family and community. The loss is without compare.

Rest well, Brother...

Erik



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by DoomsdayRex
 


We all seem to look at our own mortality when something like this happens, been doing some searches and have not found an official announcement as of yet, I will post it when it becomes available or maybe someone else will.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 01:21 PM
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Originally posted by Aquarius1

Nick just called to tell me that our friend and colleague Mac Tonnies was found in his apartment this (Thursday) afternoon, apparently dead of natural causes.


What natural causes exactly -would be my next question.

Light and love to him as he moves on and condolences to his family, friends and those who saw in him a man that had the courage and strength to break out of the box.

[edit on 23-10-2009 by spinkyboo]



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by redwoodjedi
He is best known in ufology as a proponent of the cryptoterrestrial theory--that is, the theory that the intelligences we call "aliens" or "visitors" are neither. They live along side of us pretending to be those things, camouflaging themselves in our expectations and surviving the human advancement.


Though other researchers have advocated this theory before Tonnies, he was responsible for it's becoming more popular within UFO research. It had a lot to do with his personable attitude and the fact he seemed above the ridiculous personal politics of the field; it was about research and theories, not personality.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by spinkyboo
 


I have been thinking about that also, what exactly are "Natrual Causes", if it were cancer that is not natural for one. He was working on an non-fiction book, hope we haven't lost that as well..



[edit on 23-10-2009 by Aquarius1]



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 01:35 PM
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Originally posted by Aquarius1
I have been thinking about that also, what exactly are "Natrual Causes", if it were cancer that is not natural for one. He was working on an non-fiction book, hope we haven't lost that as well..


In this case, cancer would be considered a "natural cause" as opposed to foul play or suicide.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 01:43 PM
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reply to post by redwoodjedi
 




Gone but not forgotten. Remembered for what he gave us. Remembered for where he was bringing us. His is the story of a man with his whole future ahead of him and not distantly so. No, right at his fingertips, actually. He was an artistic thinker, arguably poetic, and this is the fitting ending to that general story, tragic though it is for those of us who knew and appreciated Mac and for those who loved him.

Thank you for your enlightening post redwoodjedi, am also glad to hear that he finished his latest non-fiction book, it will be a legacy to him if it gets published..



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 01:51 PM
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Originally posted by Aquarius1
reply to post by spinkyboo
 


I have been thinking about that also, what exactly are "Natrual Causes", if it were cancer that is not natural for one. He was working on an non-fiction book, hope we haven't lost that as well..



[edit on 23-10-2009 by Aquarius1]


According to other sources, he was finished with the manuscript and it was ready to publish.

I'm eager to read what would have potentially put him in the forefront of the field and made him a rockstar in it. He was our Ken Wilber. Without a doubt.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 01:56 PM
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Natural Causes? In your thirties? Riiiight.. cue conspiracy theorists.

Anyone know if he was fighting any sort of terminal illness?



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 02:04 PM
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Originally posted by ZombieOctopus
Natural Causes? In your thirties? Riiiight.. cue conspiracy theorists.

Anyone know if he was fighting any sort of terminal illness?


People die of natural causes in their 30s, and younger, all the time. It's not common but it's not unusual either. He may have been fighting a terminal illness and never knew about it. Men his age and mine aren't too concerned about regular check-ups or moderating our lifestyle, the thought we are immortal and invulnerable still plagues us. Truth of the matter is, Tonnies (from what I understand) worked a day-job along with being an active UFO researcher; he probably got little rest and didn't have the best diet. That can be a lethal combination.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 02:18 PM
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Originally posted by DoomsdayRex

Originally posted by ZombieOctopus
Natural Causes? In your thirties? Riiiight.. cue conspiracy theorists.

Anyone know if he was fighting any sort of terminal illness?


People die of natural causes in their 30s, and younger, all the time. It's not common but it's not unusual either. He may have been fighting a terminal illness and never knew about it. Men his age and mine aren't too concerned about regular check-ups or moderating our lifestyle, the thought we are immortal and invulnerable still plagues us. Truth of the matter is, Tonnies (from what I understand) worked a day-job along with being an active UFO researcher; he probably got little rest and didn't have the best diet. That can be a lethal combination.


I guess it depends what you consider "natural causes".

I actually just found out about Mac maybe 3 or 4 months ago via The Paracast, I really enjoyed his interviews. I'll have a drink for him tonight.

Where ever Mac is now, I hope he found the answers he's been searching for.



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 02:21 PM
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reply to post by ZombieOctopus
 


Thanks for the reminder of Mac's interview on the the paracast, I downloaded it but never listened to.


October 26, 2008 — Mac Tonnies
Cutting-edge scientific theorist Mac Tonnies holds forth on Martian mysteries, the Phoenix Mars probe, the state of paranormal belief systems, and various theories on the reality of UFOs.



[edit on 23-10-2009 by Aquarius1]



posted on Oct, 23 2009 @ 05:05 PM
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Holy smokes. I had been away from the internet for awhile, I come back to find a great asset to UFOlogy stricken from us, 'abducted' to The Other Side. D*** I HATE when that happens.
I SPOKE TO HIM on Coast To Coast, the last (last) time he was on there. ('Simone') (NOT 'Simon', all) I --just had-- to chime in with his way of thinking. Tonnies was a --bright-- guy. I called in to ask what he thought of the CIA's role in the extraterrestrial hypothesis meme. But I listened to myself after the delay thingee, and I sound like someone who should have been asleep, instead of calling into radio shows.
It's unfair, he was too young. I only hope he now is aware of the truth about all things.



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