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I honestly believe after 10,00000 hours I have done it.

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posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 07:12 PM
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Something so simple, so bloody simple, how the hell did we all miss this gigantic in your face clue????..........







Can you all see it?, the outer steel was constructed as a staggered joint, there must be hundreds of other photo`s showing that steel with perfect symmetrical cuts, post them all
.




posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 07:18 PM
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I actually noticed this a while ago, but with no knowledge of the actual construction figured someone with experience would be able to explain that. I had forgotten about this. However, I remember thinking that if there were enough force from the inside blowing outward they would sever at each floor that collapsed.



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 07:31 PM
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Interesting... I have no idea about buildings and their structures so I would be no help, Just want to show you I acknowledge your thread and work!




posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 07:33 PM
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I agree.. I cant comment on this because I simply do not know, but if this *is* accurate, it is a hell of a find. Still, why would anyone primacord the outer shell? What would be the point?



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 07:47 PM
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Thanks all, and here we go guys.......




posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:03 PM
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A couple more, notice in this one all the chairs for the trusses have been neatly cut......



A few visible here also......



[edit on 8-9-2009 by Seventh]



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:03 PM
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Hmmm... interesting...

I wonder if there's a difference between the way the steel structures were put together in a staggered formation (makes sense for strength and structural integrity when you think about it), and the way the aluminium cladding was attached to the building.

As the aluminium was not structural, but merely aesthetic, I guess it wouldn't need to be staggered. As it was all for appearance, surely the aluminium cladding WOULD have been put on in uniform straight lines.

It would interesting to see some clear photos that would show whether the straight lines 'cut' through the sections of building were the steel structural members, or just the facade...

Food for thought...

Rewey



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by Seventh
 


Very interesting, but do you have a source or info on the drawing in your post to view in more detail? are the colors specific to certain areas, or are they random?



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:10 PM
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A little digging got me this:




posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:12 PM
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Originally posted by Seventh
A couple more, notice in this one all the chairs for the trusses have been neatly cut......




This one is more telling...

But again, I'm a little curious about the holes in a straight line near the top of each beam. I wonder if the steel structural pieces were staggered up the entire building. Might have portions closer to the ground have been deisgned a little differently? I only ask, because the location of those holes clearly lined up seem to imply that they are there to serve some sort of purpose during construction. Was this section actually designed like this - with a line of straight joins for some reason?

Just playing devil's advocate. I assume it's what the OS supporters will ask. It would be interesting to hear from those engineers and architects who worked on the towers during construction about this...

Rewey



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by Seventh
 


Here we go guys, each section is 3 storeys roughly 36 feet.....



And the alloy Facade is singular not like the steel sections it covers,



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by Rewey
 


If you look at the ground level ones they start of the same and then it`s full section, half a section to start the bond, as you can see with that picture there is remnants of mesh and concrete still attached meaning it would be minimum base floor so the cuts here would be half and full
.



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:33 PM
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Originally posted by Seventh
reply to post by Rewey
 


If you look at the ground level ones they start of the same...


I'll assume that photo was very close to the ground, as it was still standing relatively upright, and someone has sprayed marking paint on each beam.

Does what you're saying above mean that this area WOULD be joined in a straight line?

Still doesn't explain the straight lines falling from higer sections, though. Interesting...

Rewey



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:51 PM
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Originally posted by Rewey

Originally posted by Seventh
reply to post by Rewey
 


If you look at the ground level ones they start of the same...


I'll assume that photo was very close to the ground, as it was still standing relatively upright, and someone has sprayed marking paint on each beam.

Does what you're saying above mean that this area WOULD be joined in a straight line?

Still doesn't explain the straight lines falling from higer sections, though. Interesting...

Rewey


After the fancy steels right at the base they begin the bond full section - 36 feet, half section - 18, and then it`s bonded all the way to the top, if they were straight joints they would be weak, imagine brickwork running up all directly on top of each other
.

/cheers.



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 08:55 PM
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you really need to explain what your talking about. I have never even heard of this before and no one else that has posted really says what this is about either. I have no idea what this about and what these pictures are showing me



posted on Sep, 8 2009 @ 09:02 PM
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Originally posted by scghst1
you really need to explain what your talking about. I have never even heard of this before and no one else that has posted really says what this is about either. I have no idea what this about and what these pictures are showing me


What he's saying is that if you look at some of the larger sections of steel structure falling, you can see clean, straight lines along the edges where the pieces broke apart.

The 'official story' claims that the steel structures broke apart where they were weakest - at the joins. However, as the colourful image above shows, the joins were all staggered, in order to increase their structural stability.

If these huge steel sections were all staggered, then how could there be pieces broken off in long straight lines unless the steel structures were cut first (using something like a line of cutting charges)...

That's it in a nutshell...

Rewey

[edit on 8-9-2009 by Rewey]

[edit on 8-9-2009 by Rewey]



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 02:53 AM
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7th,

You have really impressed me over the last few days with your attention
to detail.

You should submit this to AE911 for review. I have direct contact. U2U
if you like.



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 03:00 AM
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I hate to say it, ... but save yourself another 10.000 hours and let it go, ... nothing will ever come of this.

It's like chasing a girl that will never go out with you, ... it only ends up in heartbreak.



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 03:05 AM
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I suppose we should also forget these flashes too?

www.youtube.com...

^ For you Seventh. Keep up the good work!



posted on Sep, 9 2009 @ 03:16 AM
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I've seen this argument before, years ago. I remember that staggered diagram with color codes, etc.

I never saw an explanation for it either.

However, would it be necessary to cut the exterior support structure if you could compromise the inner columns instead? I mean, if you cut the internal columns into sections, wouldn't the exterior be needed to "mask" the internal explosions?




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