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Knowing a text message is incoming, before the phone receives it

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posted on Aug, 7 2009 @ 04:40 AM
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ive done this same thing back when i used to carry a cell phone (cant afford it now) lol it happened more or less with loved ones more ofthen i noticed....




posted on Aug, 7 2009 @ 05:00 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


I don't know if you're taking the mickey or being serious


And I don't claim to have a special talent, clearly from this thread it's something most people are familiar with.



posted on Aug, 7 2009 @ 02:15 PM
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reply to post by scghst1
 


I've heard that called phantom vibration syndrome and I used to have it when I had my phone in my pocket a lot. My muscles would twitch and make it feel like I was vibrating but it never resulting in a call coming in.



posted on Aug, 7 2009 @ 03:00 PM
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As stated previously most speakers buzz 1 or 2 secs before your phone receives the text or anybody else close by even in fairly large offices.

In regards to waking at a time you want, this is down to setting an alarm clock on your body clock. Examples are many people wake up just before their alarm goes off (usually the same time every day) I believe this is because their body and mind does not like to be shocked awake by the alarm so wakes 'naturally' moments before it's shocked awake.

Every time I have to get up early for a particular reason I check the time before I go to sleep and then tell myself what time I need to wake - it usually works. I don't think this is in any way special, I have spoken with loads of people who do it.

Finally and MOST IMPORTANTLY there is/was a lot of talk about using mobile phones as a form of mind control. As the brain works on electrical impulse, I think it is based on somehow firing those synapses. So perhaps some people are more susceptible than others.

www.scientificamerican.com...
The data showed that when the cell phone was transmitting, the power of a characteristic brain-wave pattern called alpha waves in the person's brain was boosted significantly. The increased alpha wave activity was greatest in brain tissue directly beneath to the cell phone, strengthening the case that the phone was responsible for the observed effect.



posted on Aug, 7 2009 @ 03:13 PM
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Originally posted by SeeingBlue
reply to post by scghst1
 


I've heard that called phantom vibration syndrome and I used to have it when I had my phone in my pocket a lot. My muscles would twitch and make it feel like I was vibrating but it never resulting in a call coming in.


Phantom Vibration syndrome develops when a certain part of the body becomes used to twitch when bombarded with the VHF given off by electronics.

If you get rid of the Phone and you walk by something giving off those same VHF signals, that part of the body will twitch. Resulting in the Phantom Vibration Syndrome. It will take your body some time to get used to not having that burst of VHF signals and will eventually stop.



posted on Aug, 9 2009 @ 12:44 AM
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reply to post by johnb
 

The 'mind control' in that SciAm article title was a an attempt at humour by the editors, not something to be taken seriously. The study was conducted with only ten subjects, so it, too, was a bit of a joke. Anyway, from the article, this:


The arousal effects the researchers measured are equivalent to about half a cup of coffee, and many other factors in a person's surroundings will affect a night's sleep as much or more than cell phone transmissions.

Still, if a transmitting phone can induce a brainwave change, perhaps it can induce one to perceive that a call is arriving. But the induction range is likely to be very short. I wonder whether Now_Then and the OP wear their mobile phones strapped to their heads like the folk in that study.


As stated previously most speakers buzz 1 or 2 secs before your phone receives the text or anybody else close by even in fairly large offices.

Not news to me. I'm a guitar player. You should listen to that buzz coming out of a Marshall amp with the gain turned up. Nobody puts their mobile down on their amp more than once in a lifetime.



posted on Aug, 9 2009 @ 01:39 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


lol - no i imagine it could be 'quiet' loud on an amp


That was just the first link i found but I believe there was some concern about police radio's transmitting on the same wavelength as our brain waves - will have a look later to see if i can find the articles/research.



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 04:26 AM
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a reply to: dmorgan

I have similar Experiences. It usually happens when I am asleep. I sleep for a while and I don't wake up easily. Well one day I slept through my alarm, and I was still asleep. I was supposed to meet a friend and walk to class. When I wasn't there she texted me and asked where I was. I remember waking up all of a sudden, and like 3 seconds later I got a text asking where I was. I thought it was coincidence, but it looks like it is completely normal, or at least normal for the abnormal



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 04:42 AM
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a reply to: king9072

Strangley enough, I look at my clock and say ok I need to get up at this time, I go to bed and always get up before the alarm. If I had to get up at a constant time everyday, it could be explained by saying that it was just a sleep cycle. The only thing is, this happens on weekends, who gets up early on weekends?



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 05:31 AM
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a reply to: dmorgan

This has always happened with me since even before the be-wonderment of cell phones and computers. It's not a new phenomenon at all, save only to the Why Generation and up.



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