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The universe is big - [IMAGE]

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posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by _damon
 


Even destruction and unbalance serves a purpose if you really think about it. Clears the way for new life if anything else.




posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 09:19 PM
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just imagine ... our universe probably isnt even close to being the biggest universe out there.

if you believe in multiple universes and all.



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 09:23 PM
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Originally posted by Now_Then

Originally posted by AlwaysQuestion
@Now_then - thanks for the video, nicely done.


Just to say that's not my vid!! (don't wan't people to think that's my work!! - although I wish I did do that sort of thing)

Just remembered it as soon as I saw the pic.

And about the alien dudes finding us... We may be small... But you also got to factor in how much we have being shouting at the universe in the past 100 years!!... You just have to swing past when everyones in bed - our planet is lit up like an xmas tree...

Then you got the all radio waves and there are a couple of man made items that have actually left the solar system by now... Voyager and Pioneer probes off the top of my head.

I wonder what they make of "I Love Lucie"?



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 09:25 PM
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reply to post by OmegaPoint
 


Actually they now think that the signal degrades to the point of unintelligibleness before it even reaches the nearest star.



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 09:35 PM
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Behind the Deep Field images of galaxies we can see, with enhancement, they found what they called the "Blue Wall". So dark in the distance only faint blue light gets through. It is a solid wall of nothing but galaxies.

Solid galaxies all around us, billions, with billions of stars each as far and farther than we can see.

Big just is not a big enough word.

Infinite comes close


ZG



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 09:36 PM
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Originally posted by Watcher-In-The-Shadows
reply to post by OmegaPoint
 


Actually they now think that the signal degrades to the point of unintelligibleness before it even reaches the nearest star.

Oh thank God. That's SUCH a relief!!!



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 09:36 PM
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accidental double post, sorry.

[edit on 14-4-2009 by OmegaPoint]



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 09:38 PM
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Originally posted by ZeroGhost
Behind the Deep Field images of galaxies we can see, with enhancement, they found what they called the "Blue Wall". So dark in the distance only faint blue light gets through. It is a solid wall of nothing but galaxies.

Solid galaxies all around us, billions, with billions of stars each as far and farther than we can see.

Big just is not a big enough word.

Infinite comes close


ZG


Way to go God! Quite the feat of creation!!!



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 10:00 PM
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This is pretty cool but only shows you sizes of stars.

For a really good view on Galaxies and groups of galaxies you guys should check the back page of one of those annual or semi annual National Geographic World Atlases. One of the really big ones that a small child could not lift on his own.

There is usually a Universe Map at the back page that gives you an insane perspective and some values of how small we actually really are.



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 10:00 PM
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OMG!!!

Did anyone notice there was, like, a face on Mars???



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 10:16 PM
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Originally posted by ZeroGhost
Behind the Deep Field images of galaxies we can see, with enhancement, they found what they called the "Blue Wall". So dark in the distance only faint blue light gets through. It is a solid wall of nothing but galaxies.

Solid galaxies all around us, billions, with billions of stars each as far and farther than we can see.
ZG


sorry but never heard of the "Blue Wall"... where's the reference to that?



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 10:21 PM
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um WOW

and 2nd line WOW!

And now i realised i need more characters, since when was this put in?


 
Mod Note: One Line Post – Please Review This Link.

[edit on Thu Apr 16 2009 by Jbird]



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 10:27 PM
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To say...WOW.....just don't cut it. This image goes beyond words. Thanks for posting this, I copied it for my own reference. Now if anyone sees this and still says we are the only living beings in this universe is...IMO....a fool.
Just think for a minute how really BIG this is. This is how far Hubble could see
at the present time, it goes even further. Space must go on forever.
It really makes me wonder how many and what kinds of life is out there.
This was from that little square Hubble stared at for a time. What about the rest?

This is close to trying to imagine.....God.........you just can't do it.


Ex

posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 10:36 PM
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Well...I'm just in WOW !
Love this thread also!!
Make you really think what are we...and what for.......



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 10:59 PM
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Kind of scary in a way, we only see what is on this planet and not very often wonder what is outside of it.

our galaxy is just scratching the surface.

Then instead of countries spending their money on useful things like sea and space exploration, they waste a ton of cash in wars.. and they say money doesnt grow on trees? but they spend it how they like.

its all greed.



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 11:00 PM
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This makes me feel like nano-bacteria underneath a virus' fingernail. And in comparison we are probably even smaller.



posted on Apr, 14 2009 @ 11:09 PM
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I think this will fit nicely here



Frank Drake formulated his equation in 1960 in preparation for the Green Bank meeting. This meeting, held at Green Bank, West Virginia, established SETI as a scientific discipline. The historic meeting, whose participants became known as the "Order of the Dolphin," brought together leading astronomers, physicists, biologists, social scientists, and industry leaders to discuss the possibility of detecting intelligent life among the stars.

The Green Bank meeting was also remarkable because it featured the first use of the famous formula that came to be known as the "Drake Equation". This explains why the equation is also known by its other names with the "Green Bank" designation. When Drake came up with this formula, he had no notion that it would become a staple of SETI theorists for decades to come. In fact, he thought of it as an organizational tool — a way to order the different issues to be discussed at the Green Bank conference, and bring them to bear on the central question of intelligent life in the universe. Carl Sagan, a great proponent of SETI, utilized and quoted the formula often and as a result the formula is often mislabeled as "The Sagan Equation". The Green Bank Meeting was commemorated by a plaque.

The Drake equation is closely related to the Fermi paradox in that Drake suggested that a large number of extraterrestrial civilizations would form, but that the lack of evidence of such civilizations (the Fermi paradox) suggests that technological civilizations tend to destroy themselves rather quickly. This theory often stimulates an interest in identifying and publicizing ways in which humanity could destroy itself, and then countered with hopes of avoiding such destruction and eventually becoming a space-faring species. A similar argument is The Great Filter,[1] which notes that since there are no observed extraterrestrial civilizations, despite the vast number of stars, then some step in the process must be acting as a filter to reduce the final value. According to this view, either it is very hard for intelligent life to arise, or the lifetime of such civilizations must be relatively short.

The grand question of the number of communicating civilizations in our galaxy could, in Drake's view, be reduced to seven smaller issues with his equation.





N = R^{\ast} \times f_p \times n_e \times f_{\ell} \times f_i \times f_c \times L \!

where:

N is the number of civilizations in our galaxy with which communication might be possible;

and

R* is the average rate of star formation in our galaxy
fp is the fraction of those stars that have planets
ne is the average number of planets that can potentially support life per star that has planets
fℓ is the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop life at some point
fi is the fraction of the above that actually go on to develop intelligent life
fc is the fraction of civilizations that develop a technology that releases detectable signs of their existence into space
L is the length of time such civilizations release detectable signals into space.



www.activemind.com...








[edit on 14-4-2009 by Revolution-2012]



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 12:03 AM
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reply to post by Revolution-2012
 


It should be noted that the Drake Equation is not science. It's speculation. It's a thought experiment. It's a conversation piece, but has no real academic merit.

Perhaps one day, the Equation may be solvable - but almost all of the variables are completely unknown and unknowable with our current level of technology. Thus, we can only guess at the variables involved. *GIGO*, programmer slang - but in this case you can supplant the G with Guess. Guesses in, Guesses out. It's really not much more accurate than simply looking up at the sky and pulling a random number from your hindquarters. The Drake Equation currently can come up with any number between 1 (us) and one hundred billion plus.



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by OmegaPoint
 


I concur; I have always wondered if it was really such a good idea to send so many signals out, purposely trying to attract attention. Shouldn't we first try to figure out whether the folks we might attract are good guys or bad guys?

With this in mind, the illustration gives me hope that whatever signals we send out will be so dwarfed by the rest of the galaxy, and itsd potential cacophony of signals that it will be indetectible. Perhaps only a whisper across the stadium during a drag race. Having said this, it leaves me very sad for our prospects of ever becoming real space explorers.



posted on Apr, 15 2009 @ 12:17 AM
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The universe is a work of art. It is God's handiwork.

"They know the truth about God because God has made it obvious to them. For ever since the world was created, people have seen the earth and sky. Through everything God made, they can clearly see His invisible qualities - His eternal power and divine nature. So they have no excuse for not knowing God." - Romans 1:19,20

The reason I include scripture in this post is because it's hard not to be able to see the handiwork of God through the universe. God knows it is difficult for His creation - Man - to believe in someone they can't physically see and that is why He provided us with the evidence that He does exist through His creation of the universe and everything around us. The solar system is called a "system" because it is in perfect balance. It is not a random thing. It is a "system". If you take a handful of pennies and throw them in the air then what will happen. Will they land to form a picture or a word? More than likey, not. But rather, they will probably spread all over the floor and make a big mess. So it is with all that rock floating in space. What are the chances of some rocks suddenly stopping in their flight paths from a big bang or explosion in space - which is the basis of belief for the non-creation believing scientists - and forming a perfect system capable of supporting life - with the sun as it's power source. And what are the chances of these rocks - on their own - orbiting around each other in perfect harmony so as not to bump into each other. And what are the chances of the sun and the moon appearing exactly opposite each other to give us day and night. And isn't it interesting that both the sun and moon provide us with light. How clever God is to provide us with light even at night by having light from the sun reflect off of the moon. And what a good God we have to allow us to see the wonders of the universe by reflecting the light of the sun off of the stars so that they can be seen when we look up and when we look through our telescopes.

I could go on and on but in the interest of time let me leave you with this. Are the starts numbered? How many are there? I think you may find the answers to these questions as well as other information about many other scientific discoveries in the world we live in through the following link:

www.raptureforums.com...






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