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Making my own seed bank, tips and recommendations please.

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CX

posted on Mar, 16 2009 @ 01:12 PM
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Hi all,

After reading the post about seed banks that you can buy, i was thinking about making my own.

This would be for storing away and forgetting about unless needed in the future.

I would like some advice about four things please.

1. What seeds to get?
2. How long can they be stored for?
3. What are ideal storage containers?
4. What quantity would you recommend?

Are there any time restrictions on seed storage?

Can you add anything to the seeds to prolong thier shelf life?

Do you store seeds depending on your likes, or what will keep you alive longer?

Thanks in advance for any advice with this, having got into growing my own veg just these last week or so, it will be reassurring that i had a complete seed bank should the shops ever go down.

CX.




posted on Mar, 16 2009 @ 01:24 PM
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We just made a seed bank last week.
My buddy is coming over later and he is the one who knows more about seeds then i do.
I'll have him post here or u2u later on.



posted on Mar, 16 2009 @ 01:28 PM
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Wah...almost no time...but the most important thing I wanted to add first is to make sure that you always always buy HEIRLOOM seeds. These are the ones that will give you more seeds because they are fertile, and if you learn to save the seeds from each plant properly, you will never have to buy again, and can give loads away to friends and neighbours. Don't know where you are, but in the UK , I get mine from realseeds.co.uk



posted on Mar, 16 2009 @ 01:31 PM
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I keep those little silica gel packs that come in various products. Most people throw them away, but I put them in with my seed packets as extra insurance against moisture. I don't really know the best container to store them in. Hopefully someone with more experience will come and fill us in.


CX

posted on Mar, 16 2009 @ 02:24 PM
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Thanks for the advice everyone.


Great idea about the anti moisture sachets, i always chuck them away.

I'm in the UK so i'll take a look at that link....thank you.

Looking forward to the post from your mate who knows about seeds, always good to listen to someone who knows what they are on about, it will save money. time and effort.

CX.



posted on Mar, 16 2009 @ 03:11 PM
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reply to post by caitlinfae
 



Thank you for that. I've been a little wary of ordering across the pond, due to pressurisation and x-ray issues.

Silica gel is a good idea, hopefully a real gardener will confirm that. Keep seeds in a dark, cool place.



posted on Mar, 16 2009 @ 07:28 PM
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I was asked by "DRUMSRFUN"to reply to this tread i was a bit reluctant because i am french and my second language is english. Here goes!!
1-what seeds to get?
fist and one of the most important things to look for is seed that are not genetically modified and that are pollinated naturally.
here is a bit on ogm's that you might want to see and that will make you want organic seeds
www.youtube.com...
try getting seeds for plants grown locally because they will be easier to grow.
always ask as much info from the grower or dealer as possible.
look for organic seed dealers in your area or order from nearby!!
2-how long can they be stored for?
The five most important factors affecting seed longevity are:
1. Seed type
2. Seed quality
3. Integrity of the protective seed coat
4. Seed moisture content
5. Storage environment
Inside each seed is a living plant embryo that even in a state of dormancy
breathes through the exchange of gases and is constantly undergoing
metabolic (aging) processes. The natural lifespan of a seed is influenced
by several factors including: permeability of the seed coat, dormancy,
seed physiology, and the storage environment. Seeds of many of our
native plants and weedy alien species have dormant embryos and hard
seed coats, a condition that retards germination and consequently
enhances longevity. The presence and degree of seed dormancy and
subsequent metabolic rate varies considerably between species and thus
influences their natural lifespan. For most species from temperate and
arid climates reducing and maintaining a low seed moisture content,
storing seeds at moderate to low temperatures, and taking precautions not
to damage seeds during cleaning and handling, slows down the metabolic
process and thereby increases their longevity in storage.

3-what are ideal storage containers?
air seal package with an air sealer i find is best . try to package your seeds in several packages of the same seeds (for quality control and it symplifies seeding)after sealing them i put them in mason jars and kept in a cold dark area of course and yes silica gel is good just make sure its still good.
4-what quantity would you recommend?
you dont want to overdue it but a good quantity and dont forget you can always salvage your own for next year.
hope i answered your questions to your liking! let me know how it goes and good luck!



posted on Mar, 16 2009 @ 07:44 PM
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Keep them in the fridge. Dark & cold.

Just like nature, seeds will "sleep" when they are in a winter mood.

When germination time comes they will react better to the rise in temperature.



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 09:17 PM
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Seeds sprout best in a warm, moist environment. Therefore, to store seeds, you need to create the opposite conditions. The above suggestion about the silica gel packs is a good one. You want your seeds to be no more than 8%-9% moisture. I have my seeds in a glass jar in the fridge with a couple silica packs in there. When you get ready to sprout them, get them out about a week before you plant to let the moisture level rise.

Certain seeds store longer than others. The shelf life listed below assumes that seeds are stored correctly. Seeds can be expected to have 80% of normal germination or greater for at least this long. However, you should have at least some germination for much longer if you take care of your seeds.

Basil 3
Bean, Dry 3
Bean, Lima 3
Bean, Snap 3
Broccoli 5
Carrot 3
Cauliflower 5
Celery 3
Collards 4
Corn 2
Cowpea 3
Eggplant 5
Lettuce 5
Onion 1
Parsley 1
Parsnip 1
Pea 3
Pepper 4
Pumpkin 4
Spinach 5
Squash 4
Sunflowers 2-3
Swiss Chard 4
Tomato 4
Watermelon 5
Zucchini 4


[edit on 17-3-2009 by sweetpeanc]



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 10:15 PM
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My grandparents kept seed from each crop every year. She kept them in an old oatmeal container. She saved what she didn't use each year, so I had seed that some were 20 plus years old. I have used the oldest and the newest before. The old will sprout and produce, but it might not be as productive as the new. If you have old, plant it, and then use that plants seed for the next year.

That is if you have old seed and are not sure about it.



posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 04:52 AM
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Originally posted by sweetpeanc
Seeds sprout best in a warm, moist environment. Therefore, to store seeds, you need to create the opposite conditions. The above suggestion about the silica gel packs is a good one. You want your seeds to be no more than 8%-9% moisture. I have my seeds in a glass jar in the fridge with a couple silica packs in there. When you get ready to sprout them, get them out about a week before you plant to let the moisture level rise.

Certain seeds store longer than others. The shelf life listed below assumes that seeds are stored correctly. Seeds can be expected to have 80% of normal germination or greater for at least this long. However, you should have at least some germination for much longer if you take care of your seeds.

Basil 3
Bean, Dry 3
Bean, Lima 3
Bean, Snap 3
Broccoli 5
Carrot 3
Cauliflower 5
Celery 3
Collards 4
Corn 2
Cowpea 3
Eggplant 5
Lettuce 5
Onion 1
Parsley 1
Parsnip 1
Pea 3
Pepper 4
Pumpkin 4
Spinach 5
Squash 4
Sunflowers 2-3
Swiss Chard 4
Tomato 4
Watermelon 5
Zucchini 4


[edit on 17-3-2009 by sweetpeanc]


good posts folks.

Are those numbers next to the seeds months or years? I'm hoping years



posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 05:15 AM
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Yes, years!

second line



posted on Mar, 18 2009 @ 05:25 AM
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Svalbard seed vault used to have an updated list of what they had stockpiled and a brief list of important ones, that could be of help. If it still exists. Id get carrots



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