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Will nanotech save the world or is it mostly hype?

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posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 06:06 AM
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will nanotech save the world?

read this article and let me hear Your appenion

www.cnn.com...

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posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 06:14 AM
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I think nanotechnology can change the world greatly, but it comes to the matter of how people decide to use it. Sure there will be people to use it for good, but there are many more that are willing to use it for bad. I'm not going to say that nanotechnoogy is going to make or break human existence, but it sure is going to change the way people look at things.



posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 08:32 AM
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that article was boring. nothing about world-altering technologies.



posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 10:36 AM
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Unless they change the dangers of existing nano technology then I would have to say no.


Now scientists have come up with evidence that messing with nanotechnology can literally do your head in.

Tests have shown that tiny carbon particles known as buckyballs one of the brightest hopes of the nanotech revolution can cause serious brain damage in fish.

There are also signs that they can harm the liver, and, more sinisterly, disrupt the operation of genes.

The findings are the first to indicate a real health hazard associated with nanoparticles. A few animal studies had previously shown that man-made particles thousands of times smaller than the thickness of a human hair are capable of moving into the brain after being inhaled. But the new research goes further, and suggests they can cause physical damage.


Those are some serious ailments if you ask me, I know the tech is still developing but unless they can solve these problems then I dont see Nano revolutionizing the world.
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posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 10:57 AM
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It's mostly hype right now because that technology doesn't really exist except in theory. But it is the hype that is spurring private capital investment, which will in turn be the catalyst for the technology to take root.

Don't believe the hype 'til you see it, though. And don't be surprised when the practical use of the technology in 30 or 40 years is so expensive that only the elite can afford it!

DC



posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 11:34 AM
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The "benefits" of nanotech are all hype. The warnings should be well heeded. What they are trying to do is alter the physical laws written by the Author of Life. Once we disrupt the natural balance, we won't have to worry about things like the Middle East or Iraq or North Korea.



posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 11:46 AM
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Originally posted by CommonSense
The "benefits" of nanotech are all hype. The warnings should be well heeded. What they are trying to do is alter the physical laws written by the Author of Life. Once we disrupt the natural balance, we won't have to worry about things like the Middle East or Iraq or North Korea.


Alter the physical laws? Author of life? What? No, I believe in God, but as such, I don't believe it's within our power to alter the physical laws. Everything we've done so far has been well within the parameters, and so will everything we do in the future. If the Author of Life didn't want us to play with our toys, he wouldn't have given us these big brains. Making micro-machines is no different from making macro-machines. If we followed a standard of non-innovation, we might as well have never invented the Polio vaccine, or numerous other life-saving/improving means and methods.

DC



posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 12:31 PM
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DC

When you start trying to force atoms to do something beyond their natural properties, you are trying to alter natural laws. Is alteration possible - no - it's against God's plan. The problem though, is that we're stuck with the side effects and the imbalance created by it. Cures for disease are not attempts to force unnatural combinations. Another way of looking at it is as with cloning. Has there ever been a cloned animal that hasn't been defective? What will happen to our food supply if buckyballs start replicating en masse?



posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 01:42 PM
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Originally posted by CommonSense
When you start trying to force atoms to do something beyond their natural properties, you are trying to alter natural laws. Is alteration possible - no - it's against God's plan. The problem though, is that we're stuck with the side effects and the imbalance created by it....
Right. Side effects such as electricity. Such as internal combustion. Such as hybridization. If atoms were off limits, I'm sure there would have been clear instructions in 'the plan'. When was the last time you received an update to the plan, anyway? Was there ever a plan? As far as I know, the plan is we all die, some of us burn in a pit of flame for eternity, and some of us grovel at God's feet for eternity. Why would the plan have everything to do with our deaths and nothing to do with our lives? There's no plan...

Cures for disease are not attempts to force unnatural combinations. Another way of looking at it is as with cloning. Has there ever been a cloned animal that hasn't been defective? What will happen to our food supply if buckyballs start replicating en masse?
Cures for diseases are the fruits of our effort to master our environment... man's self-declared and primary purpose. Has there ever been a cloned animal that wasn't done so as the result of an infant and immature science, which one day will be improved to the point of practicality, like all the other branches of science that make our lives better today? And if buckyballs replicated en masse (whatever they are), and threatened our food supply, I'm sure we could kill enough of them to mitigate that risk. And then rapidly clone more food to compensate...

The man with the plan didn't have anything to say regarding what we could do with the World he gave us, other than to say it is ours to do with what we will. Since God is the Master of the Universe, and it was created with his other, more sentient creations in mind, I only have to assume that all of the components which comprise it are ours to deal with. By His Grace.

DC



posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 03:38 PM
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DC,

Given mankinds history, is this something to play with without some form of control? Take a look at this link.
www.wired.com...



posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 03:51 PM
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Good article. Now I know what a buckyball is.

Yes, there will be a trial and error process, as there is with every science. The Greeks used to drill holes in people's heads as a cure for headaches, for the love of God. Then we thought it might be a good idea if we stuck blood sucking parasites on ourselves.

There are things we don't know. There always will be. But just because some fish explode isn't any good reason to stop learning how to make ourselves better, if there even is a good reason.

Deny Ignorance,
DeltaChaos



posted on Apr, 18 2004 @ 10:47 PM
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Originally posted by CommonSense
DC

What will happen to our food supply if buckyballs start replicating en masse?


Buckyballs cannot replicate because they are NOT nanomachines(Which is far off maybe 20 years...) they are inert molecules made of 60 carbon atoms and they do sometimes exist in nature(in smoke stacks, volcanic vent etc) same with Buckytubes(which are elongated Buckyballs). Your post shows how much ignorance you have of the natural laws of the universe.



posted on Apr, 19 2004 @ 07:16 AM
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Originally posted by toffa_h
that article was boring. nothing about world-altering technologies.


if you dont have any interest in it dont write a thing......



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