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DR Congo - what is really happening

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posted on Nov, 1 2008 @ 12:41 PM
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Hey everybody!!

I'm wondering what is really happening in DR Congo. Why are UN forces running? I don't know much about that region and what is happening there, I just read some articles in local newspaper, but millions(!?) of refugees, pregnant women giving birth roadside(!?), dead bodies on the road, burning villages, .....

Who are those militias, what are they fighting for, and who against?

Answers highly appreciated...

Greets




posted on Nov, 1 2008 @ 01:13 PM
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theres more info here www.abovetopsecret.com...

remeber rwanda? the massacers that happened there with the tutsi and the hutu

thier tribal lands cross several borders

looks like its flaring up again but in the DR congo



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:13 AM
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Boxing Day Machette Massacre

On Boxing Day there was a massacre in a church in eastern Congo. More than 100 were hacked to pieces by the LRA (Lord's Resistance Army). The LRA says they're innocent and blames Uganda. Maybe I've missed it, but I can't find any threads about it on ATS...


Deaths in Boxing Day machete massacre in Congo 'top 100'


December 29, 2008


The death toll in the Boxing Day machete massacre in a church in a remote part of eastern Congo may exceed 100, according to reports.

[---]

“The scene at the church was unbelievable. It was horrendous. On the floor were dead bodies of mostly women and children cut in pieces,” Captain Magezi said.

[---]

The rebel spokesman, David Matsanga, who spoke by telephone from Nairobi, Kenya, blamed Uganda’s 105th Battalion. “They were airlifted to Congo to kill civilians and then say we are responsible,” he charged. “They want to justify their stay in DRC [Congo] and loot minerals from there like they did before.”

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



posted on Dec, 30 2008 @ 02:28 PM
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More than 400 people have been killed in Christmas massacres.


BBC: Christmas massacres 'killed 400'


30 December 2008


More than 400 people have been killed by Ugandan rebels in the Democratic Republic of Congo in attacks since Christmas day, aid agency Caritas says.

The head of Caritas in DR Congo told the BBC some 20,000 people had fled to the mountains from the rebels, who have denied carrying out the attacks.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



posted on Dec, 30 2008 @ 02:47 PM
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Originally posted by sovietmanI'm wondering what is really happening in DR Congo. Why are UN forces running? I don't know much about that region and what is happening there, I just read some articles in local newspaper, but millions(!?) of refugees, pregnant women giving birth roadside(!?), dead bodies on the road, burning villages, .....


The Congo is home to the worst atrocities in human history. And that is really saying something! The depth of perversion and utter cruelty is so bad it is rarely reported.


Most of the worst abuses have been committed by rebel groups, many of whom fled to Congo after taking part in the Rwandan genocide of the 1990s, she said.

“The atrocities perpetrated by these armed groups are of an unimaginable brutality that goes far beyond rape,” she said in a statement. “Women are brutally gang raped, often in front of their families and communities. In numerous cases, male relatives are forced at gun point to rape their own daughters, mothers or sisters.”

The statement continued: “Frequently women are shot or stabbed in their genital organs, after they are raped. Women, who survived months of enslavement, told me that their tormentors had forced them to eat excrement or the human flesh of murdered relatives.”
www.msnbc.msn.com...




Militiamen grilled bodies on a spit and boiled two girls alive as their mother watched, UN peacekeepers have charged.

Militiamen have kidnapped hundreds of civilians from rival ethnic groups, decapitating some, torturing others and forcing the rest to work as porters or sex slaves, according to a UN report released this week summarising testimony from witnesses. "Vital organs were said to have been cut off and used as magic charms. There were also reports that (ethnic) Hema children were thrown onto arrows stuck into the ground," it said.

The report said: "In one corner, there was already cooked flesh from bodies and two bodies being grilled on a barbecue and, at the same time, they prepared her two little girls, putting them alive in two big pots filled with boiling water and oil."
www.theage.com.au...



PYGMY leaders have called on the UN to set up an international tribunal to put government and rebel fighters from the Democratic Republic of Congo on trial for acts of cannibalism against their people.

More than 600,000 pygmies are believed to live in the Congo’s vast jungles, where they eke out a subsistence existence. Both sides in the war regard them as “subhuman”, and believe that their flesh can confer magical powers.

UN human rights activists reported this year that rebels had cooked and eaten at least a dozen pygmies. Some of the worst atrocities took place when the Congolese Liberation Movement, one of the main rebel groups, tried to take the town of Mambasa from the rival Congolese Rally for Democracy last year.

www.timesonline.co.uk...



[edit on 30-12-2008 by Sonya610]



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 02:33 AM
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The Congo situation is one of the most tragic stories in modern history. The literal news blackout is staggering when one considers the amount of death and destruction that has taken place in the name of neocolonial exploitation and corporate profiteering. MSM loves to engage in its typical smug, intellectual dishonesty by portraying the situation on a micro level that focusd on tribal spats and ethnic sensitivities. The Congo's people, as honorable as they are, have been conveniently ushered into the darkest corners of history. If people only knew what the Twa have accomplished long before the ancient civilizations of the Sumerians, Kemet, Harrappans, etc... graced the planet.

The real reason you never hear anything substantial about the Congo is because of the dominating interests of European cartels and zionist bankers. One of the most complete reports I've read on this conflict came from this report:

dissidentvoice.org...

The conflict in the Congo is part of a greater strategy imposed by neocolonial agents operating throughout the African continent and, indeed, the world. Another piece you should definitely familiarize yourself with is the transcript of Cynthia McKinney's hearing on the US Government's covert operations in Africa:

muhammadfarms.com...



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 03:09 AM
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reply to post by zewari
 


Your reply is so typical of the usual African response to why their country has descended in bloodshed - blame America, France, England, Protugal ... all the old Colonial governments.

It's their fault people are murdering and raping ... it's their fault the citizens of African countries are supporting regime after greedy regime and are dominated by homicidal maniac Dictators who plunder and ruin.

Why can't Africans just start taking a little responsibility and a having a lot more self-respect.

You are right in that there is some measure of exploitation going on from some countries and companies (for their natural resources). But they leave themselves wide-open for those sorts of practices by running around like a bunch or crazed headless chickens - and these countries and companies are only able to do this by being aided by people on the inside.



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 10:55 AM
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Do you understand that the Congo's history did not begin ten years ago? What gives you the confidence to boldly state people in Africa are "supporting regime after greedy regime"? Do you really think any of these brutal governments exist by the will of the people?

Familiarize yourself with the details of this nation's history and see if you can still arrive at the same conclusion. Understand what happened from King Leopold's brutal occupation over a century ago to the conflict today. Realize that what is happening now is the end result of over a century of colonial and neo-colonial meddling. Learn about Patrice Lumumba- who that great freedom fighter was and what he stood for, about how he was deposed by a CIA sponsored coup through a thug named Mobutu Seseseko, and how the rise of that thug precipitated the downward spiral of that rich nation through the hands of the western oligarchs. The interference of the colonial interests did not end with the exit of colonial governments.

Also understand that the actions of the oligarchic elite do not reflect on the interests of the nations they originate from, so pointing out the responsibility of these elites from Europe, the US, Russia, and Israel does not cast responsibility on the majority of people living there. So if you hearing the blame cast on these nations causes you to feel like the finger is being directed at you on some level, learn to make the distinction between yourself, and the super-rich that commit these crimes. With that said, there is a case to be made about the complacency of the Western public in failing to acknowledge the responsibility they bear in making the Congolese situation come to a halt. Where do you think the guns and money fueling the conflict come from? What about all those mercenary groups protecting mining interests? There are no weapons manufacturers in Africa.

I'd strongly suggest you read John Stockwell's insider account of the CIA's covert operations in Africa. There's also a great documentary called the Empire in Africa, which demonstrates the ways of the international cartel in forcing their agenda in Sierre Leone. The same story repeats itself throughout the continent, and the world.



posted on Nov, 5 2009 @ 11:35 AM
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Maybe the "mas" in christmas means massacre?

Before it was called "christmas" it was known as Childer-mass.

Childermass was the slaughter of the Holy Innocents, the decree of King Herod to slaughter all males under 2 years old.

What is most odd is that people accept Jesus died for others, but these "holy innocents" were those who died because of Jesus, or in his place. A turn of events.


This "Feast of Holy Innocents" is observed on the same day as Boxing Day, Dec. 28.






[edit on 5-11-2009 by Alethea]



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 03:04 AM
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reply to post by zewari
 


Yes, having being born in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), lived in South West Africa (Nambia), Nigeria, Mozambique, Botswana, Malawi, Lesotho and South Africa - I can state confidently that the problem can end with the people because if they could overthrow the apartheid Government of South Africa, then they can throw out any other sick dictator sponsored by CIA/China/Russia (take your pick).
But they don't ... they remain embroiled in tribal wars and petty disputes over who gets the next load of WHO and UN food shipments.
Every election comes (if they are lucky) and they vote for the guy that promises the most outrageous things. When he can't deliver, he gets ousted in a coup, and the next dictator is ushered in.



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 04:25 AM
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Cursory affiliation with any subject matter is not enough to make you an authoritative voice on a topic. I hope you realize that being born in Zimbabwe does not validate your argument- its just a weak attempt at appealling to authority.

The South African people's overthrow of the apartheid regime was not an isolated event that occurred in a historical vacuum. It was the culmination of S. Africa's defeat in Angola and Zimbabwe, the growing partisan resistance, and most importantly, the heavy weight of international pressure spurred by boycotts and public pressure exerted on influential governments. These ingredients are not present in the Congo, and the media blackout is partly responsible.

Look, if you are serious about developing a sound understanding of this tragedy, make an honest effort at evaluating the serious work done on this topic. Stop relying on convenient biases to reinforce a world view you'd prefer to buy into to rationalize your complacency.



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 05:32 AM
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reply to post by zewari
 


If my cursory affiliation is not enough for me to be allowed to have an opinion, then how about Archbishop Desmond Tutu?
Speaking in Dubai recently he said:



I often feel a jealousy when I visit Dubai and Qatar and see what the leaders have done with oil revenues. My heart aches when I think we have, in Africa, countries equally oil-rich and yet they are languishing in debilitating poverty because of corruption at the top. We look at Nigeria, Sudan, Zimbabwe and we see how leaders can devastate their lands and contrast it to what is seen in some of the oil-rich countries of the Gulf.”


Link

He is not blaming the West - he is putting the blame squarely on the shoulders of African leaders. Rightly So.



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 10:59 AM
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Did you notice that quote did not include the Congo? Please understand that every situation is unique unto itself.

You're certainly entitled to have an opinion on any subject, but if you want to have an informed opinion, please consider strongly my earlier input.

[edit on 6-11-2009 by zewari]



posted on Nov, 9 2009 @ 03:37 AM
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reply to post by zewari
 


Of course every situation is unique to itself, that is obvious. But there are other factors involved, some you have mentioned. But, what are the overriding factors?

Do you really think tribe-on-tribe violence is a new thing in Africa? That the CIA or Western powers created it?

Here is a new headling coming from the DRC:

Democratic Republic of Congo police have arrested about 100 people accused of killing dozens and displacing thousands in a tribal conflict over fishing rights, a government spokesman said.


Link

Do you really think the foreign intelligence agencies have any interest in fishing rights of a lake in the DRC?
Don't you think these sick people should take some kind of responsibility for running around killing innocent men, women and children? Or do you blame it all on foreign governments?

I don't need to know the "context" to know that killing is wrong. Mass murder is wrong no matter in what context it was formented.



posted on Nov, 9 2009 @ 11:21 AM
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Context is critical. These sort of acts are not borne out of thin air. The inexplicable poverty and mass influx of ARMS coming in through the hands of external actors has certainly contributed to the crisis. What you're seeing in the Congo now is the outcome that can be expected in any society facing tremendous scarcity of resources necessary for daily survival. The reason this condition of scarcity exists is entirely due to the actions of various intelligence outfits, mercenaries from your neck of the woods, corporate profiteers, etc...



posted on Nov, 10 2009 @ 02:58 AM
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reply to post by zewari
 


Zewari, I am not denying any of the factors that you have mentioned. Nor am I denying that some form of exploitation has occurred and is still occurring is certain areas/countries/industries.
Capitalism, comes to mind. But then again, the Soviets did the same. So do the Chinese. So do the Africans.

What you are glibly ignoring is the fact that it is easy to manipulate people who are unable to put aside tribal differences.
Especially since they have been killing each other since Tribes came about. It's nothing new - there has always been conflict over resources (from water, to fishing, grazing, hunting ... even women).



posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 03:15 AM
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It's not that there is some form of exploitation but that there is TOTAL exploitation. How else can over 6 million people be killed in a span of 5 years and no one hears about it? How else can some of the most rarest quality of ore for various metals be harvested en masse in a war zone? How do you know this conflict is "nothing new" for that area and that the tribes have been killing each other since seemingly forever? What source of information do you have to rely on for drawing such a conclusion? None of us really know the history of that place. Even the earliest journals and Western accounts that many mainstream historians and anthropologists rely on re: the Congo's history are so horribly tinged with racist sentiment and a total lack of objectivity, that using them to conclude anything about the place's history and its people would be ludicrous. The only account that really engages the starting point of the cycle of exploitation was "King Leopold's Ghost"- a must read for anyone interested in this topic. Everything that's happening today is essentially a continuation of the colonial rampage initiated by the Belgians.

The Congo is so rich with resources that if the development of a civic society had proceeded without interference, it would have easily been one of the most prosperous nations on the face of the planet. The emergence of an honest democracy had been intentionally undermined by Western interests that financed and armed to the teeth strong-arm dictators and warlords hell bent on destabilizing that entire region. Casting any notable measure of blame on the Congolese public contributes nothing towards developing an intellectually honest understanding of the fundamental causes of this conflict.

The focus should be on the external actors that are responsible for this African holocaust. Those of us with the capacity to bear pressure on our governments should act to force them to deal fairly with the interests of the Congolese people. It's a moral imperative, and we bear the burden of sin for letting our collective silence be our complicity in this genocide.



posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 03:52 AM
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reply to post by sovietman
 


My second thread ever, back in 2006:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Never got a lot of support.

I simply believe no one cares what happens in the Congo.



posted on Nov, 11 2009 @ 04:35 AM
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Originally posted by zewari
The Congo is so rich with resources that if the development of a civic society had proceeded without interference, it would have easily been one of the most prosperous nations on the face of the planet. The emergence of an honest democracy had been intentionally undermined by Western interests that financed and armed to the teeth strong-arm dictators and warlords hell bent on destabilizing that entire region. Casting any notable measure of blame on the Congolese public contributes nothing towards developing an intellectually honest understanding of the fundamental causes of this conflict.


If you honestly think that blaming past events, and for foreign governments to admit their "sins" is going to help the Congolese today, then you are sadly naive.
Africans need to stop blaming others and work with each other. Not against each other.

My opinion is that Africa has been hard done by. Yes, absolutely. Exploited and mistreated! Again, yes.
But everything that goes wrong, every pothole, corrupt politician, murder, genocide ... and it all comes down to blaming the West's Manipulation, Colonial Influence and Multinational Corporations raping their land.

When a person pulls the trigger of an AK-47 while aiming at a child, or hacks off the legs of a priest, then my sympathy ends.



posted on Nov, 12 2009 @ 07:31 AM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck

I simply believe no one cares what happens in the Congo.


There's certainly an element of truth to that statement, but this is sort of a chicken-egg argument. I would contend that the subjects that the general public takes interests in are never really driven by the genuine interests of the general public. The general public simply follows the social queues it is offered by the corporate media. People often like to think that the news media follows trend forecasts in dedicating its coverage, but this is not the case. If the Congo crisis actually received the attention that the latest celebrity gossip gets- replete with touching, sympathetic profiles of the victims and high-profile celebrities raising awareness for this tragedy, the public interest would certainly spike to a fever pitch.


Originally posted by deltaalphanovember

If you honestly think that blaming past events, and for foreign governments to admit their "sins" is going to help the Congolese today, then you are sadly naive.


It's not about casting blame for past crimes, but about understanding the genesis and evolution of the conflict in the Congo. This is not an "African" problem in the sense that the issues plaguing the Congo were brought by internal tensions. The Congo's mess is the direct outcome of systematic covert operations from various external factions. The various factions engaging in battle are simply acting as agents of one external benefactor or another. If this conflict was to come to an end, the solution seems clear- the external factions sponsoring this conflict must be criminally prosecuted under the various legal provisions available.


Originally posted by deltaalphanovember

Africans need to stop blaming others and work with each other. Not against each other.


This sort of sentiment is a convenient crutch for people who want to wish the problem away without any real consideration of the facts on the ground. Again, we're not talking about a problem where the role of these various external benefactors of this conflict is relegated to the pages of history... this is happening right now. There have been several serious efforts at exposing these actors. I've posted the few that I am familiar with, and hope this allows you to develop a more comprehensive angle on this particular crisis. Being well-informed will allow you to find ways in which you can contribute towards the forces that are seeking to end this crisis.



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