What do you consider as the best martial art in the world?

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posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 11:07 AM
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try mexican judo, judon't know if I got a knife, or judon't know if I got a gun. just joking no offence meant.




posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 11:16 AM
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My training was in traditional Western boxing, judo and jiu-jitsu. The combination always worked well for me.

The thing that I always found most interesting was that the things that are usually frowned upon in traditional martial arts, e.g. eye-gouging, biting, etc are THE most effective things that you can do in a real self-defense situation. They are also techniques that almost anyone can do, regardless of physical ability. My advice: If you’re in a life or death fight – fight DIRTY.

Otherwise, training in any martial art is better than not training at all. But bear in mind one fact: learning how to get hurt is an integral part of learning how to fight for real. You can learn every technique in the book but if you have never been conditioned to getting really smacked in the face then you are NOT ready to fight. I've seen plenty of traditional western boxers beat eastern practicioners because of this ability to take a punch. So, if you're serious, don't just learn to inflict pain - learn how to take it. Because, at some point, no matter how good you are, you will get hit.



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 11:21 AM
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Originally posted by passenger
My training was in traditional Western boxing, judo and jiu-jitsu. The combination always worked well for me.

The thing that I always found most interesting was that the things that are usually frowned upon in traditional martial arts, e.g. eye-gouging, biting, etc are THE most effective things that you can do in a real self-defense situation. They are also techniques that almost anyone can do, regardless of physical ability. My advice: If you’re in a life or death fight – fight DIRTY.

Otherwise, training in any martial art is better than not training at all. But bear in mind one fact: learning how to get hurt is an integral part of learning how to fight for real. You can learn every technique in the book but if you have never been conditioned to getting really smacked in the face then you are NOT ready to fight. I've seen plenty of traditional western boxers beat eastern practicioners because of this ability to take a punch. So, if you're serious, don't just learn to inflict pain - learn how to take it. Because, at some point, no matter how good you are, you will get hit.


i agree, and i think it is important that no matter what disipline you are in, you need to fight in tournaments to learn how to react upon getting hit.



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 11:26 AM
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reply to post by 5ealchris
 


You've really gotten me interested!

I just looked up classes in my state, I'm going next month.

I'll check it out for a few weeks, but it looks really good!



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 11:41 AM
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Sam colt had the best idea.
I like kali/escrima to help with knife skills. Krav maga is probably the better for hand to hand. Most martial arts are more into competition than true martial arts. You can't just go down to the local dojo and learn how to kill someone. The better question to ask is are you capable of actually killing someone with your hands. It is one thing to beat someone, knock them out, or make them submit, it is quit another to take another life. Ask someone that is ex special forces. In a true survival situation you must be lethal as well as quick. Your opponent must be taken out with whatever is at hand as quickly and often quietly as possible. In my opinion martial arts do not equip their students with the necessary tools to do this.

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 11:49 AM
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Originally posted by reluctantpawn
Sam colt had the best idea.
I like kali/escrima to help with knife skills. Krav maga is probably the better for hand to hand. Most martial arts are more into competition than true martial arts. You can't just go down to the local dojo and learn how to kill someone. The better question to ask is are you capable of actually killing someone with your hands. It is one thing to beat someone, knock them out, or make them submit, it is quit another to take another life. Ask someone that is ex special forces. In a true survival situation you must be lethal as well as quick. Your opponent must be taken out with whatever is at hand as quickly and often quietly as possible. In my opinion martial arts do not equip their students with the necessary tools to do this.

respectfully

reluctantpawn




and that is why it is called "special" forces...as you well know they have to know the instant in which deadly force "is" used, and when it "isn't" used. that is just one criteria that washes so many out of that elite fighting unit.

[edit on 17-6-2008 by jimmyx]



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 11:51 AM
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reply to post by Toy_soldier
 


Yeah, systema is awesome. Its a very practical martial art and is pretty easy to learn.

And also in systema you learn how to use your enviorment as a weapon which is a very useful skill to have.

I took some lessons when I was in highschool. And I have never forgotten them.

And now that I am in colledge I cant really afford the lessons.

But all you really need is a sparring partner, and maybe a few instuctional dvds on systema to learn it.

But I find it is better to have an instuctor to just so he can show you hands on how to do certain techniques and such.
But it really is not necesary because you're supposed to develope your own system of sorts.

And here are some good websites about it if your interested.

www.russianmartialart.com...
systemamartialart.com...
www.systemaspetsnaz.com...

And as I mentioned before there are many great youtube videos.

[edit on 17-6-2008 by 5ealchris]



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 01:00 PM
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I prefer Tai Chi Chun.

Why use your energy when you can use your opponent's energy against them?

Plus, Fa Jing is one of the most devastating use of energy conversion invented.



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 01:11 PM
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I am fully trained in the scottish martial art of Fk-U!!!

this invloves headbutting, then jumping on your opponents head when they are on the ground.

You can see this fighting style demonstrated outside any nightclub in Glasgow at the weekend


Once mastered, you can then progress to learn " way of the intercepting barstool ".. No need to explain this special move



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 01:19 PM
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any martial art is good training, but the best preparation for real life fights is to fight a lot. Whether sparring at the dojo or engaging in back alley brawls, the only thing that truly helps improve your fighting ability is to fight a lot. Assuming you don't get killed early on.

Martial arts help prepare you and are great. If you practice a move or series of moves like a kata thousands of times they become second nature and you do them in a real fight without even thinking, but you need to be in real fights.

Any martial arts master that does not take a strong, fast, and experienced street fighter seriously is full of #. Like i said, martial arts helps, but a good boxer or streetfighter would be a tough opponant for anyone.



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by zeetroyman
 


It may sound funny but I agree with this. I studied Shotokan, grappling and boxing in my younger days but learned the most in bar fights. It's good to have a base but you REALLY learn from real action.

That said, I like the looks of Akido. I haven't studied it but it seems to be a combination of Karate and Judo. That's a good combination imo.



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 01:25 PM
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Even tho i do jujitsu and muay thai, i can honestly say that jujitsu is unfair fighting and really stupid, i mean really stupid, i despise it really.

i mean what kind of guy has to take his opponent to the ground, wrapping his legs around him while punching him and putting him in a choke hold...

jujitsu ( or those who take an opponent to the ground to fight )
are WHOOSIES in my opinion..the only reason i am combining my muay thai with jujitsu is because i know there are fag fighters out there who will take you to the ground in order to fight you..these guys are normally fatso flabmasters who know they can't win a proper fight, so they use their weight against you and crush you with their flab.

stand up and fight like a man...



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 01:26 PM
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Ecky-Thump (pronounced ehk-ee thoooomp) is an ancient and traditional martial art originating from Lancaster, Lancashire in Northern England. Similar but superior to Kung Fu in many respects, it utilizes long, fierce-looking Black Puddings in place of more inferior Eastern weaponry. Practitioners of the martial art are easily distinguished through their ritualistic flat caps and accompanying whippets.

A rare image of a black-pudding master in training, somewhere in the hills above Rochdale:



I'm still only on my yellow-pudding, it's the tougest and most secretive of all combat arts...by 'eck!



[edit on 17-6-2008 by citizen smith]



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 01:34 PM
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Originally posted by CallMeMaury


Any martial arts master that does not take a strong, fast, and experienced street fighter seriously is full of #. Like i said, martial arts helps, but a good boxer or streetfighter would be a tough opponant for anyone.


Boy, do I agree with this.

A lot of thugs you may meet on the street has a LOT of experience in fighting.

Experience is one of; if not THE most important aspects of fighting.



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 01:59 PM
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The easiest way to tell is to apply a simple test to the art or style in question.

How much of it is done as unrehearsed sparring, rolling or competition with an uncooperative opponent?

How much of it is done as rehearsed sparring with a cooperative opponent?

To summarize, it's not the art or style necessarily, it's the method of practice. Rehearsed, stylized, cooperative styles and methods are likely to be ineffective in the real world.

The following arts and styles are generally done with a majority of unrehearsed, spontaneous practice with an uncooperative opponent:

Judo, Jiujitsu, Wrestling, Boxing, modern MMA, Muay Thai kickboxing, Kyokushinkai Karate and Russian Sambo.


The following arts and styles are generally done with a majority of rehearsed, non-spontaneous practice with a cooperating opponent:

Krav Maga, Aikido, Chinese and Japanese traditional martial arts, Wing Chun and JKD.



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 02:01 PM
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reply to post by citizen smith
 


That picture looks more like Haggis chuan to me. It takes great skill to inflict mortal wounding of the digestive tract. The Spice fu masters have disenfranchised the Haggis chuan fighters for centuries.

Zindo



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 02:01 PM
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I think if you haven't studied a martial art before, you should try Muay Thai. If you can find a full contact school near you, that would be the best. To add to what's been said previously, it doesn't really matter how much technique you have if you're not used to getting punched, kicked, elbowed in the face. With Muay Thai, you will be getting beaten all the time. You'll get used to keeping your eyes open, for example, when getting attacked. Muay Thai is also nice, because it's not for show. You learn some solid striking, but the real power's in the kicks, knees, and elbows. A few kicks to the inner thigh and an elbow to the eye, and I don't care how tough someone is, they won't be able to see and they can't put any weight on their lead leg.

Grappling's useful if it's one on one, but if you're in a street fight and the other guy's got friends, you'll just end up getting kicked in the head or groin if you take it to the ground. So I would say learn grappling, just because it is popular to learn ground techniques with UFC and all, but for actual street fights, Muay Thai can take you really far really fast.



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 02:03 PM
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The best martial art is discipline and peace.

The aspects of physical confrontation vary according to your opponent and situation. Perhaps most importantly, what is the objective? Self-defense is only half the answer, does that mean disable, cripple, kill? Once choice of 'style' is very relevant

Many true masters 'appear' to fight as an amorphous collection of styles instead of one.

I'm not sure there is a specific 'best' that can be cited, although I kind of like the corny "no style" is best.

Martial artist create dynamic physical art as a product of their discipline. It is a thing of beauty to behold.

Outside of the commercial aspect and ego massaging, tournaments are for audiences, not combatants. If you're all about belts and trophies, somethings' missing from your training. It's not Hollywood.



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 02:06 PM
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IMO, the best form of self-defence is ''How to manage Conflict''.

Work in any A&E department on a Friday or Saturday night and see this for real.



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 02:18 PM
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Originally posted by Badge01

The following arts and styles are generally done with a majority of unrehearsed, spontaneous practice with an uncooperative opponent:

Judo, Jiujitsu, Wrestling, Boxing, modern MMA, Muay Thai kickboxing, Kyokushinkai Karate and Russian Sambo.



Dude, you forgot systema.

you can check out my previous posts if you want to know what it is all about.






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