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Ten discoveries that rewrote history

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posted on Apr, 9 2008 @ 11:58 AM
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I think these are the ten most important - other ideas?

Not in order of importance

Machu Picchu

Pompeii & Herc

Dead Sea Scrolls

Minoan civilization, Knossos

Olduvai gorge

Tomb at Xi'an

Rosetta stone

Finding of what most think is Troy

Nineveh's Assyrian Library

Tut's tomb

What other key "events"?




posted on Apr, 9 2008 @ 12:25 PM
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Dead Sea scrolls were key, but the Nag Hamadi showed the corruption of the Vatican from its earliest times. Nothing hidden will not be revealed so it might be time to clean out the basement and discover a few lost things eh?

To the List we should add Kennewik Man. whites of european descent inhabiting north america before the current native americans. We will soee many more of these remains uncovered as we expand and use a larger footprint in more unused area.



posted on Apr, 9 2008 @ 01:24 PM
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Dead Sea scrolls were key, but the Nag Hamadi showed the corruption of the Vatican from its earliest times.


Could you explain that a bit more please?



To the List we should add Kennewik Man. whites of european descent inhabiting north america before the current native americans.


The original discover (Chatters) described him as Caucasoid.

Anthropologist Joseph Powell of the University of New Mexico examined the remains and his conclusions were contradictory. Kennewick Man was in fact not European but rather resembled south Asians and the Ainu people of northeast Asia. The results of a graphic comparison, including size, of Kennewick Man to 18 modern populations conducted by Chatters et al. to determine the skeleton’s relation to modern ancestry showed that he was most closely related to the Ainu.

Study



We will soee many more of these remains uncovered as we expand and use a larger footprint in more unused area.


Yep, more discoveries will occur - Archaeology and associated areas of study are constantly adding new info.



posted on Apr, 9 2008 @ 10:24 PM
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Now that I've had a bit more time to think on this one, let me add

Finding L'anse meadows

Finding the Polynesian chicken

Both of the above proving the existence of earlier than Columbus sea travel to the Americas.

Otzi

The 400,000 year old wooden javelins



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 12:26 PM
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The discovery and subsequent utilization of electricity is probably one the most important discoveries in human history.



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 12:29 PM
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Don't forget the discovery of the human brain.



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by Threadfall
The discovery and subsequent utilization of electricity is probably one the most important discoveries in human history.


Howdy Threadfall

Well yes but we're discussing archaeological discoveries!



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 01:08 PM
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posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 01:26 PM
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But of course - that is if they are real. Good point thanks for the reminder about the Sumerian tablets.

The Royal Library Ashurbanipal - however its not alternative, the alternative stuff comes in with Sitchin's mind blowingly weird made of translations!



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 09:48 PM
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Hi Hanslune,

Santorini and the accompanying Akrotiri

Skara Brae, Scotland

Omo 1 and Omo 2 cranial remains

Homo Sapiens Idaltu remains


Although not archaeological, I believe this has helped tremendously:

Genetics and Anthrogenealogy

cormac



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 10:31 PM
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Howdy Cormac

Santorini I included under Minoan civilization

Yep discoveries in genetics and DNA that allow estimates about evolutionary time frame - good addition. Not sure what the label for that would be.

The technologies of Carbon-14 and other dating techniques have been highly important.



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 10:52 PM
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The Tocharians


The Antikithera device



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 11:08 PM
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Ah yes the silk road and its many civilizations.

I'm not sure if the Antikithera device would make it into the top ten but certainly the top fifty.

Discussion?



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 11:45 PM
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Originally posted by Illahee
Dead Sea scrolls were key, but the Nag Hamadi showed the corruption of the Vatican from its earliest times.


The twelve papyrus codices that were recovered from Nag Hammadi are Gnostic works and show no evidence of any corruption in the Vatican. Contrary to a belief made popular in the book “the Da Vinci Code”, neither the council of Nicaea nor the Catholic Church wrote or modified the bible. The Books of the bible were already being chosen well before either of these existed. There are lists of canonical documents dating back to at least 170AD, 155 years before the council of Nicaea, 211 years before the Bishop of Rome first accepted the title of Pontiff, and 884 years before the Great Schism even caused the creation of the Roman Catholic Church. Men such as Irenaeus, who was second generation taught from the Apostle John, were already bench-slapping gnosticism as non-Christian heretical teachings by as early as 180AD, with his five volume: "On the Detection and Overthrow of the So-Called Gnosis", also known as ”Against Heresies”.

I really wish that folks who want to use Gnosticism to try to pick on Christianity would at least learn the history of Gnosticism and the Church first. Really…

Some other early Church Fathers who knew the original Apostles:

Saint Ignatius of Antioch
(also known as Theophorus) (ca. 35-110) was the third Bishop or Patriarch of Antioch and a student of the Apostle John. En route to his martyrdom in Rome, Ignatius wrote a series of letters which have been preserved as an example of the theology of the earliest Christians.


Polycarp
Polycarp's famous pupil was Irenaeus, for whom the memory of Polycarp was a link to the apostolic past. Irenaeus relates how and when he became a Christian, and in his letter to Florinus stated that he saw and heard him personally in lower Asia; in particular he heard the account of Polycarp's discussion with John the Evangelist and with others who had seen Jesus. Irenaeus also reports that Polycarp was converted to Christianity by apostles, was consecrated a bishop and communicated with many who had seen Jesus.


Clement of Rome

Tradition identifies him as the Clement that Paul mentioned in Philippians 4:3 as a fellow laborer in Christ

The Liber Pontificalis, which documents the reigns of popes states that Clement had known Saint Peter. It also states that he wrote two letters (though the second letter, 2 Clement is no longer ascribed to him) and that he died in Greece in the third year of Trajan's reign, or 100 AD.



[edit on 4/10/2008 by defcon5]



posted on Apr, 11 2008 @ 12:01 AM
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Interesting Defcon5. May I suggest you start a thread on this subject in the context of the rise in Christian civilization and lost knowledge.



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