Anyone here a Freemason? Anyone know a Mason?

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posted on Apr, 4 2008 @ 07:26 PM
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Originally posted by a-being-?
So you the Masons help people by giving to charety right? can you give and examples of the organisations you fund ? the choice of funding is decided by whom? Is it always the same organisations that are funded?


It varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction; here in Kentucky, the Grand Lodge publishes its charitable activities:
www.grandlodgeofkentucky.org...

Over $30 mil a year to charity. Additionally, many lodges also do things in their local community. For example, the lodge that I belong to gives out a yearly scholarship to a worthy student in the local high school.

I'm very proud of what the Grand Lodge of Kentucky does for needy children, and what my own lodge does here to help a kid go to college. However, charity is not the main focus of Masonry (though Masons in the US give an average of $700,000,000 to charity every year) but it is a nice side benefit for the communities we live in.


Originally posted by a-being-?
When you see presidents swear on to the masonic bible thus becomming president is that just a pose?


Well, only four presidents have actually used that bible... but it has more to do with the fact that George Washington used it than anything else. This is a good history of the Washington Bible if you're interested:
www.masonicinfo.com...




posted on Apr, 4 2008 @ 07:33 PM
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reply to post by JustMe74
 


Still it is my personal opinion Masonry does not do enough within individual communities.. specifically to help children within education, which is the biggest burden to parents. As a student who paid his way through college, it angers the hell out of me that most of the charities involve the old and decrepit. Granted they need our help, to get Masonry in the publics eye and to TRULY make a difference.. we need to be involved within the community and assist the younger students in higher education.

Though that is my opinion .. I just feel the older generation has misdirected our charitable contributions. Few know what Masonry is because we don't do enough to make a difference in specific localized locations.

I am already making big plans for when I am Worshipful Master.



posted on Apr, 4 2008 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck
Still it is my personal opinion Masonry does not do enough within individual communities.. specifically to help children within education, which is the biggest burden to parents.


I agree and disagree. I think the institutionalized charities that are run on state levels by a lot of Grand Lodges should probably be dropped. However, I think you're right that individual lodges should be doing more in their communities. I think part of the problem is the aging base of Masonic membership... however, there are a lot of new, young people in their 20's and 30's joining now that should change things.



posted on Apr, 4 2008 @ 09:12 PM
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reply to post by Masonic Light
 


Thanks for the insight. I thoughtfor a moment that it referred to actual landmarks. OK, you can stop laughing now.



posted on Apr, 4 2008 @ 09:41 PM
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Originally posted by lazy1981
reply to post by Masonic Light
 


Thanks for the insight. I thoughtfor a moment that it referred to actual landmarks. OK, you can stop laughing now.


Hey don't worry Lazy1981 - no-one's laughing at you. The unfortunate truth is that not everyone agrees on what the landmarks actually are. Mackay did a sterling job of codifying what was accepted in his time and in his part of the world but personally I think his list is too long.

However, the principal of the core landmarks (the ones that everyone can pretty much agree upon) is essential to defining freemasonry, and is in fact what effectively makes something regular or irregular (in masonic terms). Have a read of the following - sorry it's so long but I think it might help to put the whole thing into perspective, or at least give some more background:


AIMS AND RELATIONSHIPS OF THE CRAFT

Accepted by the Grand Lodge, September 7, 1949
In August, 1938, the Grand Lodges of England, Ireland,
and Scotland each agreed upon and issued a statement
identical in terms except that the name of the issuing
Grand Lodge appeared throughout. This statement, which
was entitled ‘Aims and Relationships of the Craft’, was in
the following terms:

1. From time to time the United Grand Lodge of England
has deemed it desirable to set forth in precise form the
aims of Freemasonry as consistently practised under its
Jurisdiction since it came into being as an organized body
in 1717, and also to define the principles governing its
relations with those other Grand Lodges with which it is in
fraternal accord.

2. In view of representations which have been received,
and of statements recently issued which have distorted or
obscured the true objects of Freemasonry, it is once again
considered necessary to emphasize certain fundamental
principles of the Order.

3. The first condition of admission into, and membership
of, the Order is a belief in the Supreme Being. This is
essential and admits of no compromise.

4. The Bible, referred to by Freemasons as the Volume of
the Sacred Law, is always open in the Lodges. Every
Candidate is required to take his Obligation on that book
or on the Volume which is held by his particular creed to
impart sanctity to an oath or promise taken upon it.

5. Everyone who enters Freemasonry is, at the outset,
strictly forbidden to countenance any act which may have
a tendency to subvert the peace and good order of society;
he must pay due obedience to the law of any state in which
he resides or which may afford him protection, and he
must never be remiss in the allegiance due to the Sovereign
of his native land.

6. While English Freemasonry thus inculcates in each of
its members the duties of loyalty and citizenship, it
reserves to the individual the right to hold his own opinion
with regard to public affairs. But neither in any Lodge, not
at any time in his capacity as a Freemason, is he permitted
to discuss or to advance his views on theological or
political questions.

7. The Grand Lodge has always consistently refused to
express any opinion on questions of foreign or domestic
state policy either at home or abroad, and it will not allow
its name to be associated with any action, however
humanitarian it may appear to be, which infringes its
unalterable policy of standing aloof from every question
affecting the relations between one government and
another, or between political parties, or questions as to
rival theories of government.

8. The Grand Lodge is aware that there do exist Bodies,
styling themselves Freemasons, which do not adhere to
these principles, and while that attitude exists the Grand
Lodge of England refuses absolutely to have any relations
with such Bodies, or to regard them as Freemasons.

9. The Grand Lodge of England is a Sovereign and
independent Body practising Freemasonry only within the
three Degrees and only within the limits defined in its
Constitution as ‘pure Antient Masonry’. It does not
recognize or admit the existence of any superior Masonic
authority, however styled.

10. On more than one occasion the Grand Lodge has
refused, and will continue to refuse, to participate in
Conferences with so-called International Associations
claiming to represent Freemasonry, which admit to
membership Bodies failing to conform strictly to the
principles upon which the Grand Lodge of England is
founded. The Grand Lodge does not admit any such claim,
nor can its views be represented by any such Association.

11. There is no secret with regard to any of the basic
principles of Freemasonry, some of which have been stated
above. The Grand Lodge will always consider the
recognition of those Grand Lodges which profess and
practise, and can show that they have consistently
professed and practised, those established and unaltered
principles, but in no circumstances will it enter into
discussion with a view to any new or varied interpretation
of them. They must be accepted and practised
wholeheartedly and in their entirety by those who desire to
be recognized as Freemasons by the United Grand Lodge
of England.

The Grand Lodge of England has been asked if it still stands
by this declaration, particularly in regard to paragraph 7.
The Grand Lodge of England replied that it stood by every
word of the declaration, and has since asked for the
opinion of the Grand Lodges of Ireland and Scotland.
A conference has been held between the three Grand
Lodges, and all unhesitatingly reaffirm the statement that
was pronounced in 1938: nothing in present-day affairs
has been found that could cause them to recede from
that attitude.

If Freemasonry once deviated from its course by
expressing an opinion on political or theological questions,
it would be called upon not only publicly to approve
or denounce any movement which might arise in the
future, but would sow the seeds of discord among its
own members.

The three Grand Lodges are convinced that it is only by
this rigid adherence to this policy that Freemasonry has
survived the constantly changing doctrines of the outside
world, and are compelled to place on record their complete
disapproval of any action which may tend to permit the
slightest departure from the basic principles of
Freemasonry. They are strongly of opinion that if any of
the three Grand Lodges does so, it cannot maintain a claim
to be following the Antient Landmarks of the Order, and
must ultimately face disintegration.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by Masonic Light
 


well I never said that the claims where correct or that it did happen.. I simply mentioned it becourse it was there and for the sake of debate i guess.

In terms of power and influence watch the link that I posted in the previous post the 2:55 hour long documentary detailing the symbology and buildings in wasington DC and the ocult symbols some say that it is "evil" or baal worship becourse they have other dieties than the christian god, and some debate against a straight cristian faith there is both sides of the story, meaning masons are good vs masons are bad. That said Iam not skilled enough to understand if that is the truth of what is being claimed.. But I cannot denie all the statues and picture language that is all around especially in places of power well watch it to see what I mean

Lastly I don't belive that all masons are elites....but I belive there might be some elites who are in the top of the game .....Watchers and planners to ochestrate the masses or maybe there isen't but it is sertainly a possebility. watch it to see what I mean and report back here what you view of that is or don't your choice.........again thanks for the answers so far

[edit on 5-4-2008 by a-being-?]



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by Trinityman
 


Thanks for the information Trinityman, once again I found this very helpful. It helps to elaborates upon ML's last post on "Ancient Landmarks"; furthermore it gives me some real insight into the notion of a "Clandestine Lodge" and the many things or reasons why they could be seen as such. Now that I've got a little better idea of the measure of strictness (not in a negative way) that is to be enforced in the Craft.

I see now why it is structured in this manner. I'm sure some would view this as The Grand Lodge becomming the "seat of power" but it makes perfect sense to streamline ritual and also what is acceptable and not acceptable in Masonry so to speak. In any event now I know what is meant by "Ancient Landmarks." Now I can stop looking for buildings and Neolithic sites.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by a-being-?
 


It all does seem to point back to an ancient gnosis and paganism in more ways then one doesn't it? And it does seem to refuse to acknowlege one's faith and take it out of context in a cunning manner as well.

In the end though, it doesn't really matter and what I am slowly coming to grips with is that the one true God has already won anyway and is really in control anyhow. I think I read somewhere a while back that during the time the Isralies and Greeks were held as slaves by the ancient Egyptian pagans that the very fist name spoken or communicated for the one true God was "L" when they scribed on the cave walls "L please save me"? I don't know how true it is but I do know that the Egyptians often like to think of themselves as Gods and want to be worshipped as Gods. One of the things that I am finding with my research on Masonry is that they seem to have some level of respect for the Egyptians? That's another reason as to why I do not feel comfortable with their oath worshipping ceremonies where a "Grand Master" sits on a throne while the scripture of one's faith is present. To me it gives me the gut feeling that it's only being mocked.

But like I mentioned, it probably doesn't matter because the one true God has already won anyway.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 08:27 PM
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Originally posted by Straighten Arrow
...I do know that the Egyptians often like to think of themselves as Gods and want to be worshipped as Gods.


At my last job I worked closely with an engineer who was Egyptian; he didn't ask me to worship him or anything, he just said that if I screwed up any drawings and got him sued and he lost his license... he would kill me.


Seriously though, nicest guy you could ever hope to meet and he certainly didn't think of himself as a god.

Perhaps you meant that the ancient pharaos used to think of themselves as gods amd that the people did indeed worship them as such?

[edit on 4/5/08 by The Axeman]



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 08:57 PM
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reply to post by The Axeman
 


Yep, I certainly didn't mean the Egyptians of today and I would get along with him just fine also.




posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 10:16 PM
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reply to post by Straighten Arrow
 


Might I ask what is meant when you say, "the on true God has won anyway?" Just out of curiosity what was the battle being fought, against whom, for what purpose, and who is the One True God that you refer to?



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 10:28 PM
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reply to post by Straighten Arrow
 


He was hilarious, really. Tiny little guy.

In all seriouslness though, of course there are, "connections" (I use that term cautiously) between Masonry and Freemasonry. I think it's a respect for the symbolisms and philosophies more than anything literally connected. There have been plenty of people, Masons and non-Masons alike who have argued the case. That's pretty much the central theme of the book The Hiram Key by Knight and Lomas. Interesting read but much speculation.

To illustrate what I mean, check out the "Egyptian Hall" in the PA Grand Lodge (I want to visit there very badly
):



Beautiful, isn't it?

But if you look at the self guided online tour you will see that many great civilizations are represented in the decorations and designs incorporated in the building. Everyone always wants to focus on one thing or another but you have to step back and look at the bigger picture. It is not only Egypt, but many of the high-thinking civilizations throughout history that Masons revere. Not because of their religions or anything specific, but because in all of them we find things that are worth emulating and showing respect for, and remembering.

At least that's how I look at it. All I know for sure is it would be an awesome place to visit and take a tour of.

edit to add: Hey look at that! ^^^ Pyramids!!


[edit on 4/5/08 by The Axeman]



posted on Apr, 6 2008 @ 12:43 AM
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Originally posted by lazy1981
reply to post by Straighten Arrow
 


Might I ask what is meant when you say, "the on true God has won anyway?" Just out of curiosity what was the battle being fought, against whom, for what purpose, and who is the One True God that you refer to?


My God and the one that you don't believe in.



posted on Apr, 6 2008 @ 12:47 AM
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reply to post by The Axeman
 



It looks nice Axeman, I myself would love to go see the great pyramids some day!

So I take it you are on the other side of the fence about the ancient Egyptians then?



posted on Apr, 6 2008 @ 09:17 AM
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Originally posted by Straighten Arrow
It looks nice Axeman, I myself would love to go see the great pyramids some day!


That makes two of us, for sure.


Originally posted by Straighten Arrow
So I take it you are on the other side of the fence about the ancient Egyptians then?


What fence?

Do I think ancient Egypt is/was fascinating? Of course.

Do I think the legend of Hiram is a continuation of the pharao making ceremonies, and that Seqenenre Tao was actually Hiram Abiff? Hmph. Not really. Some evidence exists, however the theory relies too heavily on supposition and speculation for me to give it any real creedence.

I don't completely rule it out, though, either.


I think there is a lot from Ancient Egyptian civilization that we would do well to remember, but of course there are many things that obviously contradict our modern values.

I look at it as what it is: history. Fascinating history.


[edit on 4/6/08 by The Axeman]



posted on Apr, 6 2008 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by Straighten Arrow

Originally posted by lazy1981
reply to post by Straighten Arrow
 




My God and the one that you don't believe in.


I did'nt know that GOD belonged to anyone ("My GOD") and how do you know that I don't believe in Him?



posted on Apr, 6 2008 @ 06:43 PM
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reply to post by The Axeman
 


Thanks for the picture and most of all the link. That is a truely magnificent building. I'm so used to seeing the dreary lodges (from the outside of course) in Chicago. I didn't think that there was anything so beautiful here in the states. There used to be a very large Masonic Temple (54,000 square ft.) in the Logan Square Area of Chicago (that's where I'm from) It was bought by a Baptist Church in 82' or 83' though. So to my knowledge Chicago has nothing that even looks presentable to say the least. Even the ones in the surrounding suburbs that look well kept look very uninviting to say the least. The G.L. of PA is a work of art in the truest sense of the word. Thanks for sharing.

[edit on 6-4-2008 by lazy1981]



posted on Apr, 6 2008 @ 07:18 PM
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reply to post by lazy1981
 


No problem at all, I'm glad you enjoyed it.


Do yourself a favor sometime and just go (or call) and ask for a tour. You'd be surprised how ornate a building can be on the inside even when the outside looks dreary.

I'll see if I can dig up some similar pictures of other Masonic buildings if there is an interest; I know the SR Temple in Guthrie, OK is supposed to be very nice. Also, the House of the Temple in DC. They give tours, too, if you're ever in the area.

The building my lodge is in is pretty nice. It was built in like, 1929 or something like that so it's really old and expensive to maintain. But it is quite beautiful, especially the York and Scottish Rite areas.

[edit on 4/6/08 by The Axeman]



posted on Apr, 6 2008 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by Straighten Arrow
It all does seem to point back to an ancient gnosis and paganism in more ways then one doesn't it? And it does seem to refuse to acknowlege one's faith and take it out of context in a cunning manner as well.


I'm not sure what's giving you that impression. Masonry is a product of the Enlightenment... there really is no connection to the Templars, to Ancient Egypt, or anything else of the sort. Many authors (including Masonic authors) have tried to make a connection, but there is absolutely no credible evidence that it exists, or that Masonry existed in any recognizable form prior to the 1700's.

Masonry does not "refuse to acknowlege [sic]" one's faith. Masonry is a place where people of many faiths (and political beliefs... and social status) can come together as equals, learn, improve themselves, and do good things for the community.

Most Masons that I know are devout Christians (this area is very Baptist). I'm the lone non-Christian in my lodge...



posted on Apr, 6 2008 @ 08:15 PM
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Originally posted by lazy1981

Originally posted by Straighten Arrow

Originally posted by lazy1981
reply to post by Straighten Arrow
 




My God and the one that you don't believe in.


I did'nt know that GOD belonged to anyone ("My GOD") and how do you know that I don't believe in Him?


Well that's only because you are taking it out of context.



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