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Does Islam have a sense of humour?

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posted on Nov, 20 2007 @ 08:35 AM
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Does Islam have a sense of humour?


news.bbc.co.uk

Protests over cartoons satirising the Prophet Muhammad combined with images of Muslims criticising frivolous aspects of Western culture have left the impression for some that Islam and comedy are incompatible.
And as with most stereotypes, there is a kernel of truth. In some Islamic societies entertainment - music, film and comedy - are forbidden.

No one knows that better Muslim stand-up Jeff Mirza.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.allahmademefunny.com
living.scotsman.com
commentisfree.guardian.co.uk

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Speech From Pope Outrages Muslim Leaders




posted on Nov, 20 2007 @ 08:35 AM
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The article quoted does make some good points. Humor and Islam have rarely gone together from what I have seen. The protests and the murder of an elderly nun who devoted her life to helping people over a speech from the pope are one thing. The uproar over the news paper comics feachering Muhammad. But here they are breaking the mold and making some humor. To that I say more power to them.

news.bbc.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Nov, 21 2007 @ 12:19 AM
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Islam?
One has to be so careful when discussing Islam. I haven't come across anyone i work with even that can joke about themselves and their religion like most of us non-Islamic people.

When i think Islam i think "location, location, location. SILENCE!! I kill you..."



posted on Nov, 21 2007 @ 12:30 AM
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well to be honest I have not tried to joke with people at work about Islam either. However in general people don't talk religion unless they know the person they are talking to agree with them. I do agree with what it says in the article though. I do feel that the majority do like to laugh, and can poke some fun at there text, as well as the profit.



posted on Nov, 21 2007 @ 12:45 AM
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Originally posted by RedGolem
I do agree with what it says in the article though. I do feel that the majority do like to laugh, and can poke some fun at there text, as well as the profit.


Yes absolutely right. They can joke in general but very carefully choose their words. I guess to a point we should all be like that but i guess we are able to laugh at our failures more. That is obviously a personal opinion based on my interactions.



posted on Nov, 21 2007 @ 01:08 AM
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reply to post by shearder
 


I rather think the world would be a better place if we did not have to be careful picking our words. If you do not like what some one is saying just walk away. Or don't talk to them, they most likely will not talk to you. I know there are exceptions to everything. Just thinking of the Utopian society I guess.



posted on Nov, 21 2007 @ 01:40 AM
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Oh for sure. If only everyone was just relaxed and not so highly strung i guess. Utopian society - oh what a thought hehehe



posted on Nov, 21 2007 @ 02:14 AM
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Originally posted by shearder
Utopian society - oh what a thought hehehe


That's why it's called Utopia -- it means 'nowhere'



posted on Nov, 21 2007 @ 07:26 AM
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reply to post by Beachcoma
 


I had not heard it described as no where before here is what the dictionary said.


1. Of or pertaining to Utopia; resembling Utopia; hence, ideal; chimerical; fanciful; founded upon, or involving, imaginary perfections; as, Utopian projects; Utopian happiness.
n. 1. An inhabitant of Utopia; hence, one who believes in the perfectibility of human society; a visionary; an idealist; an optimist.



posted on Nov, 21 2007 @ 07:31 AM
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reply to post by RedGolem
 


From Wiki:

Utopia

Utopia (from Greek: οὐ, "not", and τόπος, "place" [hence, "no place" or "place that does not exist"], as well as εὖ, "good" or "well", and τόπος ["good place"]—the double meaning was probably intended) is a fictional island near the coast of the Atlantic Ocean written about by Sir Thomas More as the fictional character Raphael Hythloday (translated from the Greek as "knowing in trifles") recounts his experiences in his travels to the deliciously fictional island with a perfect social, legal, and political system. The name has come to mean, in popular parlance, an ideal society. As such, it has been used to describe both intentional communities that attempted to create an ideal society, and fictional societies portrayed in literature. The term is sometimes used pejoratively, in reference to an unrealistic ideal that is impossible to realize, and has spawned other concepts, most prominently "dystopia".


I read about the term years ago in a book -- can't recall the title.

Edit to add: You might find this interesting as well: Erewhon

[edit on 21-11-2007 by Beachcoma]




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