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Garden Fresh Homemade Garlic Dill Pickles [UPDATED]

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posted on Aug, 1 2007 @ 03:03 PM
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update post: www.abovetopsecret.com...

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I love them, and usually cold-pack about a dozen or so quarts every year ... using nothing but garden fresh ingredients. The typical response from family and friends has been that Vlassic's don't hold a candle to these.

Here's the recipe:


  • 1/2 cup kosher salt
  • 1 cup distilled white vinegar
  • 4 1/2 cups water
  • Approx. 6-7 fresh pickling cucumbers (quartered or sliced)
  • Fresh dill - chopped (1-2 heads per jar)
  • Fresh garlic - peeled, chopped (4-6 cloves per jar)
  • Banana or green chile pepper - chopped (1 per jar)
  • Black peppercorns (12 per jar)

Makes approx. 3 quarts.

* of course you can also buy the ingredients from your local market ... I just prefer using garden-fresh veges and herbs.

- Stir together the salt, vinegar and water until the salt is dissolved. Set aside.
- Tightly pack 1qt. wide-mouth jars with cucumbers.
- Wedge garlic, dill, peppers and peppercorns between cucumbers.
- Pour brine mixture into jar, leaving 1/4" space at the top.
- Cover with lids and firmly tighten the rings.
- Place jars upright into a large pot or canner.
- Fill the pot or canner with water to cover jars. Bring to a boil.
- Boil for 5 minutes.

*If using a canner simply lift the rack out and place on counter to cool. If using a large pot, remove the pot from the stove and place it into the sink. Slowly run cool water into the pot until the jars have cooled to the point that you can lift them out. Be careful with the cool water so as not to crack the hot jars.

When the jars have cooled, place them into the refrigerator or in a cool dry place. Pickles are ready to eat in 24-48 hours. Me? I like to let them "set" for at least a week, if only to allow All ingredients to mingle


All in all, it should look something like this:

Start with:


Slice and Chop:


Pack into jars and submerse in pot or canner:


Remove from water, wipe jars and allow to cool:



If you like garlic dills, you'll love these.

ENJOY!




[edit on 1-8-2007 by 12m8keall2c]
edit on 8/10/2011 by 12m8keall2c because: (no reason given)
edit on 4/11/2012 by 12m8keall2c because: updated image links




posted on Aug, 1 2007 @ 03:07 PM
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Oooooh, send me some. I'll pay for labor and shipping.


Do you ever do okra like this 12m8keall2c?

Peace



posted on Aug, 1 2007 @ 03:13 PM
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Sure thing, Doc.


Priority Mail would have them on your table by Monday at the latest.


I did grow some okra last year. My wife's from Texas, and it's always been one of her fried favorites. I've never canned nor pickled any, though. Is it done using a similar recipe? ... w/ garlic and such?

I wasn't joking about sending you a quart. U2U me, I'd be happy to share.

 



posted on Aug, 1 2007 @ 03:26 PM
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I'm all over that. U2U is on it's way.

As far as the okra goes, I would assume you would do it the same. All I know is I can go through a whole jar of it at one sitting.


Peace



posted on Aug, 1 2007 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by Dr Love
As far as the okra goes, I would assume you would do it the same.


I'll look into my Ball book of canning for a recipe ... otherwise, I guess I'll hafta wing it.


Okra will be on the list for planting next year, for sure. I'm thinking that I'll have to till up another plot ... hmmm


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Oh, and the jar on the left is cucumbers and red onions in a sugar and vinegar brine ... w/ salt and cracked pepper. Mmmm ... now that makes for some good eatin'.
toss in some fresh corn on the cob and a few sliced tomatoes ...


I'm hungry now!




 



posted on Aug, 1 2007 @ 03:43 PM
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I like anything pickled. I'd probably eat pickled dog if it was offered to me.


Peace



posted on Aug, 1 2007 @ 06:43 PM
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Originally posted by Dr Love
I like anything pickled.


I didn't grow any watermelons this year, lest no pickled rinds.


... they truly are Very good, for those who have never experienced nor had such. A Ripley's moment, I guess.


MY problem ... is letting the dills "set", as the first jar rarely does so.


 



posted on Aug, 2 2007 @ 09:54 AM
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That's a really awesome garden you've got showing on the other thread. Really makes me feel humbled and lazy, and rightfully so.

I remember my dad making pickles in an earthenware crock in a brine solution. I remember it being heavy on the garlic, but don't recall much else. I know there was no cooking or heating involved, just the pickles "curing" (or whatever they do) for a week or so in the crock before they were jarred and refrigerated.

That might be some old-school method and would probably get a smackdown from health pros today (I have no idea), but DAMN those were some good pickles!

And NEXT YEAR I'm gonna put out that garden. [okay, probably not]




posted on Aug, 3 2007 @ 09:01 PM
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Ooohh I love pickles. If you start a business let me know, I'd definately be a customer for those!



posted on Apr, 9 2008 @ 07:32 AM
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reply to post by 12m8keall2c
 


Sweet!!!!

The garlic dills are my favorite


Bookmarking this thread for this summer, I will definitely be whipping up a mess of these.

Thanks



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 10:10 AM
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Originally posted by 12m8keall2c
- Stir together the salt, vinegar and water until the salt is dissolved. Set aside.
- Tightly pack 1qt. wide-mouth jars with cucumbers.
- Wedge garlic, dill, peppers and peppercorns between cucumbers.
- Pour brine mixture into jar, leaving 1/4" space at the top.
- Cover with lids and firmly tighten the rings.
- Place jars upright into a large pot or canner.
- Fill the pot or canner with water to cover jars. Bring to a boil.
- Boil for 5 minutes.


bold:mine

Thanks for the recipe, I am going to try to make these this weekend, I am only wondering about the bolded part above, are you saying to tightly seal them before cooking?

Being a novice, I thought that you tightly seal them after the cooking so as the jars cool, the seal is made tight.

Like I said, I am new to canning but eager to learn


I can't wait try out my first batch of pickles from your recipe



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 03:12 PM
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Yes, JacK. It's what is referred to as a "cold-pack" method, so you'll want to cover with lids and tighten the rings Prior to placing them into the canner. Once in the canner, there should be sufficient water to cover the jars completely. Bring the water to a boil, lower the heat just enough to sustain a slowly rolling boil for the specified time, and you should be good to go.

After having removed the jars from the canner and placing them onto a hand-towel for cooling, you'll notice the lids going from convex to concave... often times with an audible "pop". Once cooled you should be able to Press on the lids with them having No give whatsoever... a sign of a good/firm seal.

I typically place them into the 'fridge after about an hour or so of cooling on the hand-towel/cloth... it seems to help retain That Snap of freshness for the pickles themselves.

Lemme no how you make out...


p.s. beware anyone with the surname Love who introduces themself as the local health/food inspector.





posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 03:20 PM
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All your pickle are belong to me!

Peace



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 03:24 PM
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reply to post by 12m8keall2c
 


Thanks so much, my mouth is already watering at the thought of homemade pickles


We are also going to prepare some Zucchini bread as well since we are now full bore in the summer squash season


I'll let you know how it goes, thanks again for the recipe



posted on Jun, 28 2008 @ 02:57 PM
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Semi- SUCCESS!!!

I now have my first 2 quarts of pickles chillin


I did not have enough for 3, but I saved the brine for the next batch.

The only problem I had (rookie), was one of the lids came out of the pot wrinkled
and no seal, no worries, that will be the first jar consumed in a few days


I am waiting for a couple of cayenne peppers to ripen so I can add them to my next batch, "bring on the heat"


I will do one qt w/seeds and 1 w/out for a comparison.

Thanks again



posted on Jun, 28 2008 @ 03:58 PM
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No worries, JacK.
I've had a few kinked lids as well.

While they're the first to be "enjoyed", the seal has always been just as good as those which didin't... kink, that is.

While I'd recommend at least 48 hrs chilling in the fridge, I can't say that I always "adhere" to that "rule" mahself.


The longer the better, with regards the cukes absorption of the various ingredients, but they should have a rather pungent Garlic/Dill flavor... Vlasic pales in comparison, if you ask me.

Lemme know how you like 'em.

Probably tonight or tomorrow.. eh?



[edit: to add]

Instead of adding the cayennes, try using a few Moar and Crushed perppercorns




[edit on 28-6-2008 by 12m8keall2c]



posted on Jun, 28 2008 @ 05:05 PM
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Pickle Power To The People!

Yum, my mouth is watering just thinking about them! I love pickles so much that I could win a pickle eating contest with a pregnant woman expecting triplet's!

I need to hang out here more often and get some learn'n on!



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 10:47 AM
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reply to post by 12m8keall2c
 


What a wonderful recipe !!!

The flavor of these pickles is the BEST!! My batch was a tad too salty but I just traded some fresh water for some of the brine and they are now just fine. The aroma of the fresh dill and garlic is AMAZING!!

My favorite store bought is Claussen, the ones that are in the refrigerated section of the market but they cannot hold a candle to yours


You could make a killing if you put these in local groceries.

I will be putting dozens of these up for future enjoyment and to share with friends and family.

If they are nice, I will share your recipe.... maybe



Thanks again for sharing this gem!!!



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 08:06 PM
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I've bought only Claussen pickles for years. I love the crunch.
I am going to try your pickle recipe as soon as my cukes are in.

I tried making pickles years ago, but they got so limp and salty, I had to throw them out. Looking forward to trying this recipe.

Thanks for posting it.



posted on Jun, 30 2008 @ 08:09 PM
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DID SOMEBODY SAY OKRA YALL?!


I dunno if it just cuz I'm an 8th Generation Texan or what BUT I FREAKING LOVE OKRA!!!!

Boiled, pickled, fried!!!!!!


I was excited about pickles, was going to beg for some but only to see that the good Dr.Love has already beaten meh to this, BUT OKRA?!

Man oh man, I even love the spicy pickled okra from the store... Man I need to write this down for the next time I go to the store...

Seriously I would have to marry you if you were pickling some okra...

edit: for translation from texan to engrish.





[edit on 30-6-2008 by Lysergic]





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