It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

New Chip technology 1/2000th the width of a human hair

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 02:45 PM
link   
I decided to put this into this thread because even though it is news it is more apropreate here.

Moore's Law seen extended in chip breakthrough

It seems that they have discovered a way to make microchips even smaler and more powerfull. This in turn could pave the way for the RFID chip people are so worried about. This chip is 1/2000th the size of a human hair. That would make it quite injectable.




posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 03:28 PM
link   
No, no, the minimum feature size is 45 nm, not the part itself.

The minimum feature size sets the smallest transistor size that the process can make. Intel's current feature size is 65nm. Going to 45nm will allow them to get roughly 2x the density of their current size. If you bought a Core 2 Duo, for example, your processor has 65nm features, but the part is definitely not microscopic.

On top of which, you're not going to see any injectable chips, ever, if what you mean by that is something you could get in a vaccination. An E-field part won't work as an implant, and an H-field part requires a loop antenna large enough to power the part. Even E-field antennas would have to be pretty long compared to something you could inject.



posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 04:08 PM
link   
The biochemistry of a person's body would make for an excelent antena Humans also generate electricity. All one would have to do is have this part be able to power itself off of the biochemical electricity that every human makes.



posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 04:24 PM
link   
Well, really, no. Not when the part's inside the body. You're not that good of an antenna even when you're externally excited.

Humans don't generate very MUCH electricity, nor do you have any particularly useful way to tap into it from the POV of an injected part. At any rate, a few dozen microvolts wouldn't get the job done even if you had the part hooked to, say, a muscle. But from the chip's point of view, if it were small enough to be injected, there wouldn't be enough length to tap any power even if you had a million times the electrical field strength that you do.

Nonetheless, even if you stuck a battery on it and implanted the thing, you wouldn't be able to transmit from inside the body with any success. You are fairly conductive inside, and the attenuation is just awful for any radio transmission to make it through.

Implants like the Verichip are H-field parts and do not use radio at all. They use the reactive H-field component of the interrogator for both power and signaling. However, H-fields fall off as the sixth power of the distance and thus such parts are all but useless for any distance work, even if you didn't run into the near field lambda boundary problem.



posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 04:43 PM
link   
The current theory of the NWO RFID Chip wouldent it be something that could be scanned? It wouldent have to be an active interface it could be passive and hold some data.



posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 05:02 PM
link   
Well, the terms "active" and "passive" when used in conjunction with RFID generally mean, do they have a battery (active) or are they powered by the interrogator (passive).

Active parts are generally not useful for implants, as they tend to be E-field parts which won't work as implants.

I have seen some "semi-active" parts in H-field where they have a battery for power and still use loop loading for signaling. That usually involves a different sort of interrogator since the interrogator's coils don't have to supply enough power to run the part. That also helps the signal to noise ratio. Those weren't used for implants either.

You can get the coil size down on an H-field implant by going up on the interrogator frequency, but when you do, the lambda wall rears its ugly head.

Really, the implant thing is mostly a big stretch trying to tie into John's "charagma" in Revelation, but there's so many ways to use that term it's probably going to be tough to know if it meant "tattoo" or "oath of allegiance", or simply embracing the word of the Beast as the word of God.

If I could get an E-field implant to work I would be having my secretary answer you while I was fanned by cute babes with big palm leaves, poking grapes in my mouth.



posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 06:59 PM
link   
With the recent developement of RFID ink I think the chip is becoming obsolete.



posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 07:23 PM
link   
What about when these technologies come together. Sure the tattoo RFID chip would be impressive but it could be hid. Dogs nowadays have a chip implanted in them that instantly tells dog catchers where that dog belongs. Now we can have one so small or worse that has more personal information.

That was the point of this thread, I was trying to show that smaller chips could hold more information and be used in such a way.



posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 07:49 PM
link   
You really can't describe that ink thing as a tattoo chip. There is no chip.

I haven't been able to tell what they're doing, actually. They don't have any patents filed that I've been able to get my hands on. A tatted bar code in RF absorber wouldn't work well as I posted back on the last thread involving that stuff.

It might be as some one posted late, it's not really a bar code as they described as much as it's a collection of absorbers with slightly different resonant points, being that there's more than one company with a similar technology. At any rate, you'd have to have maybe 30-40 points to assign an ID number to everyone. (don't know the world populace at the moment, too lazy to look)

If that's what they're doing, you'd have to get close or run people through a pen to separate out the returns from everyone else nearby.

But that wouldn't be related to the hafnium oxide insulator trick that you're posting about.

Smaller chips wouldn't necessarily hold more information. Whether or not the part would shrink at all depends on whether it's pad-bound or logic-bound. You have to have big transistors and structures to handle certain types of I/O. The little 65nm transistors won't get it for I/O, they're only good for on-chip logic, they can't even drive cross-chip data lines. Most medium sized logic parts like the verichip and other stuff of that complexity and type are pad bound, meaning the I/O structures involved with coil modulation, rectification of the incoming interrogator field to provide power and so on, are larger than the logic involved. You can't shrink the part smaller than the I/O ring. So even if you had really small logic structures, it ends up being a dot in the center of a big pad/IO ring. No gain.

If you have a Pentium sort of part, the logic inside the pad ring is far larger in size than the pad ring. So in that case, shrinking the logic feature size will shrink the part, since the part is logic bound. At some point, the pads will come together in a ring and at that point, further logic shrinkage won't help reduce the part size.

However, for a part that has to run on millionths of an Amp like a passive RFID part, especially one that has to use that little bit of power to run some EEROM bits, you will not be using 45nm logic, because that's nuts. You'd use big, cheap 180nm super low power stuff. Because the hafnium oxide trick is for reducing leakage in super dense logic parts like CPUs. It isn't really applicable here. Doubly so if you're talking that ink trick, since that doesn't use logic, or any sort of integrated circuit at all.

At any rate, more storage on an implant would be nuts. What good would it serve? What would the incentive be? Distributed relational data bases wouldn't need it. If I were an NWO designer, if such exists, I would never put any data on there other than an ID number and some sort of CRC or hash to tell me if you'd screwed with it. After all, you'll be out of reach 99.9999% of the time. I can't possibly update the info unless I have you present in front of a chip interrogator. Nor can I access it. And if you destroyed or altered it, I'd lose the data. The only point of having local storage would be for those cases when the police or whatnot might need to get information on you and were not in reach of a radio link of some sort, and that's unlikely.

Edit: clear up a bad turn of phrase

[edit on 28-1-2007 by Tom Bedlam]



posted on Jan, 28 2007 @ 09:40 PM
link   
Great post
I had to vote that way above top secret.

Cannot a smaller chip mean that you could pack more chips into the same size area as existing tech?

The theory behind the RFID chip NWO conspiracy is that everyone would get this mark and it would be neccissary to conduct any monitary transactions.

Couldent this tech be implemented to use a scanner to read the info on the chip to access your accounts?

Of course you would be out of rainge of anything that could pick this up 99% of the time. anyone but parents would freak if they thought they were lojacked.

but realisticly how close would you have to be to a receiver that could read the info on your chip to be effective?



posted on Jan, 29 2007 @ 12:24 AM
link   

Originally posted by whatukno
Great post
I had to vote that way above top secret.

Cannot a smaller chip mean that you could pack more chips into the same size area as existing tech?

The theory behind the RFID chip NWO conspiracy is that everyone would get this mark and it would be neccissary to conduct any monitary transactions.

Couldent this tech be implemented to use a scanner to read the info on the chip to access your accounts?

Of course you would be out of rainge of anything that could pick this up 99% of the time. anyone but parents would freak if they thought they were lojacked.

but realisticly how close would you have to be to a receiver that could read the info on your chip to be effective?


Well, like I said, whether or not smaller logic makes the part smaller depends on whether the design was pad bound or logic bound. If it's pad bound it won't shrink.

RFID parts for implant are generally pretty simplistic, since for tracking animals all you need is a serial number, and you want the part to be small.
So most of them are I/O bound, or about in balance between logic and I/O. Therefore, it won't shrink a lot even with this hafnium trick, if at all.

But you really want the process to be very low power, and RFID parts have no need for speed, so you wouldn't use a really fast process like 45nm, and the leakage from larger processes is really low and doesn't much need hafnium oxide insulators. So again, I'm not sure how this would help a lot.

Anyway, that sixth power falloff in power over distance makes it tough to interrogate an H-field part at a distance. I don't think you're ever going to get more than 2 to 3 feet unless you are running them through the interrogator loop itself, and that 2-3 foot distance will take serious engineering to reach.



posted on Jan, 29 2007 @ 10:20 AM
link   
Hey, just for fun, you can bid on your very own RFID production line. I don't know what sort of tag this equipment makes, probably clothing.

www.dovebid.com...



posted on Jan, 29 2007 @ 12:14 PM
link   
More ET tech coming through eh......



posted on Jan, 29 2007 @ 12:29 PM
link   
Thread Already Exists for This Topic

www.belowtopsecret.com...'



posted on Jan, 29 2007 @ 02:32 PM
link   
I think you could easily inject a 2+um partice into someone. No real need for nano size IMO.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join