It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Scientists Create a Molecule in Size Keypad Lock

page: 1
5

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 28 2006 @ 06:20 AM
link   
In an effort to create a near fool-proof security mechanism, scientist have developed a keypad lock equal to the size of a molecule. The new lock will not open using traditional means, such as a pin number or key, but rather the new locks will implement a system that will only respond to sequences of either light, chemicals, or both. The new system allows scientists to create "keys" by using either molecules that are acidic in nature, or those that have alkaline compounds, or UV light to form a sequence or patterns to open the locks.
 



news.yahoo.com
Scientists have created a keypad lock a single molecule in size. This lock only activates when exposed to the correct password, a sequence of chemicals and light.

Researchers suggest their device could in the future lead to a new level of safeguards for secret information. This lock might also serve to recognize when certain sequences of chemicals are released in the body--for instance, after exposure to Sarin or another deadly chemical or biological weapon.

Organic chemist Abraham Shanzer and his colleagues at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovat,
Israel, began with a molecule named FLIP. At its core is a component dubbed a "linker" that mimics a bacterial compound that binds to iron. Attached to it are two molecules that respectively can glow either blue or green.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Pretty interesting. I can't see how this will be effective in public use, due to the inability by the common household member to use a lock that is so small for personal use, but on the business side, implementing this new mechanism to data storage devices, computer system, or even bank vaults could prove very effective, despite the costs.




posted on Dec, 28 2006 @ 11:13 PM
link   
Maybe they think it will work for bioweapons that target specific races?

Like, "If you don't have the right key, you can't mutate here!"




posted on Dec, 29 2006 @ 04:03 AM
link   
If this technology is further advanced, it would be possible to make it so only certain groups can access whatever the lock is intended to keep safe. Maybe through using a person's sweat or oil on fingers, the mechanism will be able to determine whether or not it's the person intended to open for.



posted on Dec, 29 2006 @ 04:41 AM
link   
As with all safeguards though, someone will find a way around it. You can count on that. It's only a matter of time before hackers find a way to either replicate the passwords on the locks, or to brute force them. Either way, it's a very interesting development, to say the least. Thanks for that.

TheBorg



posted on Dec, 29 2006 @ 04:54 AM
link   

Originally posted by TheBorg
As with all safeguards though, someone will find a way around it. You can count on that. It's only a matter of time before hackers find a way to either replicate the passwords on the locks, or to brute force them. Either way, it's a very interesting development, to say the least. Thanks for that.

TheBorg


Well yes that is the game isnt it. Build a better lock and theves will find better ways to break into it. It comes down to the old addage Locks only keep out the honest.



posted on Dec, 29 2006 @ 05:12 AM
link   

Originally posted by TheBorg
It's only a matter of time before hackers find a way to either replicate the passwords on the locks, or to brute force them.


With these types of locks, the number of combinations available are astronomical, so brute forcing one of these will be near impossible. Not only would they have to find the right acidic molecule to open the lock, but the right light pattern as well as intensity of UV. Factor all three mechanisms as factors for a key and you have yourself a lock that is almost fool-proof. The only logical way I can see anyone finding the right key is if were extracted from the owner of the lock.



posted on Dec, 29 2006 @ 05:27 AM
link   
Or to utilize one of the many Quantum Computers that will most likely be available for use by that time to figure out the best possible combinations for the lock. There will be a standard chemical used for the locks, to cut costs, which will narrow the field somewhat. Tack onto that the costs of the other acids that need to be applied in the right places, and then we get more narrowed in our scope. It'll just be a matter of time, which hackers have in abundance.

TheBorg



posted on Dec, 29 2006 @ 04:22 PM
link   
Or if I was really really trying to break the lock, I would just make a small explosive and blow it open. Or I could use a plasma cutter, industrial blow torch, and who knows what else. I think these locks are definetly safe, cuz there is really not any kind of lock that will withstand what I just stated.



new topics

top topics



 
5

log in

join