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2008 Conservative Presidential Candidates

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posted on Jan, 15 2007 @ 09:44 PM
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Honestly, I couldn't agree more with Don's sentinments. There are some things that we need to deal with which really aren't very partisan. An excessively powerful Executive is bad for Democrats and Republicans alike. that's what we're facing, an overly powerful Presidency.

This has been coming for quite some time. Those of you who have read my CM thread know what I'm talking about. The longest journey starts with the first small step. Whoever the next President is...will matter. No just for reasons of character. If that person doesn't take steps to back away from all that newly acquired power, we should assume that things will only get worse.

I'm not convinced that McCain or Giuliani would have the willpower necessary to say "no" to that much authority. Nor do I think that Hillary could bring herself to rescend any of those newly derived powers. I don't see anyone on the scene just now who has that kind of mettle. As idealistic as he portrays himself, I doubt that Obama could turn his back on what he'd see as the many "opportunities" afforded to him by the power of the unitary executive.

As of now, the persons of character that we need are not on the national stage. This was a central point that I took great pains to make in my book. I'm not sure that we're going to see men and women of that caliber until the fires of discontent and revolution once again burn bright against the night sky in our troubled land.

Today's "conservatives" are banner-carriers, and little more. They've been in power for so long that they've developed a taste for it. That's an entitlement mentality that we don't need. I'm not asking for bomb throwers, but a little patriotism and pratical perspicacity would go a long way. We are not Rome, and Nero is not yet on the throne...I hope.




posted on Jan, 15 2007 @ 10:53 PM
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posted by Justin Oldham

There are some things that we need to deal with which really aren't very partisan. An excessively powerful Executive is bad for Democrats and Republicans alike. We're facing an overly powerful Presidency. This has been coming for some time. Whoever the next President is...will matter. No just for reasons of character. If that person doesn't take steps to back away from all that newly acquired power, we should assume that things will only get worse. [Edited by Don W]



Briefly, George Washington faced this dilemma and came out with stars! Abraham Lincoln was cut short, but it seems to me, based on his attitude towards the States in Rebellion, that he was disinclined to be a dictator. Woodrow Wilson had great ambitions, but his health cut him short.

FDR took all the power he could get and he loved it! B U T, every act of the New Deal was done in Congress, not by Executive Order. FDR got bad press on the Supreme Court “stuffing” charge, IMO. He got no appointments in his first 4 years. The 2 centerpieces of the New Deal, the AAA and NRA, had been struck down by the Court. The Agricultural Adjustment Act and National Recovery Act a/k/a the Blue Eagle Act. He proposed to add one member to the court for each member over age 70. That would have given him 4 new appointees, and assuming they would have voted his way, it would have turned the court’s vote from 6 to 3 against the New Deal, to 7 to 6 for the New Deal. In any case, he died in office in 1945 and the GOP re-gained control of the Congress in 1946.

The Vietnam War consumed both LBJ and RMN. But neither went berserk at home. In fact, Nixon signed many “liberal” laws. EPA. OSHA. Etc. I’m thinking he also signed the Earned Income Tax Credit for the poor?



I'm not convinced that McCain or Giuliani would have the willpower to say "no" to that much authority. Nor do I think Hillary could bring herself to rescind any of the newly derived powers. I don't see anyone on the scene now who has that kind of mettle. As idealistic as he portrays himself, I doubt that Obama could turn his back on the many "opportunities" afforded to him by the power of the unitary executive. Today's "conservatives" are banner-carriers, and little more. I'm not asking for bomb throwers, but a little patriotism and practical perspicacity would go a long way. We are not Rome, and Nero is not yet on the throne...I hope.



I am not aware of the FFs every arguing over the 3 separate but co-equal branch theory of government. This terminology sounds more like the invention of the Judiciary Branch. After Andrew Jackson’s angry putdown to CJ Marshall when he ruled the US was in violation of the Cherokee’s Treaty, “He has ruled, let him enforce it.” A very bad precedent on the president’s part.

Anything that can be done can be undone. Unfortunately, the act of undoing will tend to hamstring future presidents who need to be able to respond to conditions that do now allow of lengthy or public debate. That could prove tragic under the wrong circumstances.



posted on Jan, 16 2007 @ 01:52 AM
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I have no doubt that the next President will say that they'd like to step back from all that power, but the current state of domestic and international affairs will not allow it. That's why I say that things will have to get worse before they get better. Until our government is truely broken, the right people will not step forward to fix it.



posted on Jan, 17 2007 @ 04:31 AM
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Interestingly enough, tom Tancredo has tossed hish at in to the ring. How does this affect your thoughts on GOP chances for 2008? How much of a contender is he, really? Or, is he just trauling for cash? Maybe he's bucking for a shot at some cabinet post if McCain wins?



posted on Jan, 17 2007 @ 04:42 AM
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Originally posted by Justin Oldham
Interestingly enough, tom Tancredo has tossed hish at in to the ring.


Yep, great find. I haven't heard this on the national news at all yet.



Denver Post

Colorado Republican congressman Tom Tancredo's decision to form an exploratory committee in a possible run for the presidency came on the same day that Illinois junior Sen. Barack Obama, a Democrat, took the same step.

It is clear from the beginning why Tancredo is a possible candidate. He wants to advance some campaign issues, principally involving illegal immigration, that he sincerely believes would be overlooked otherwise. What Obama stands for, what has motivated his decision and fueled his ambition, is largely unknown. There is no question that he has the ability to stir a crowd and generate enthusiasm, but it is not clear where he stands on the important issues of the time, except for a distinctly anti-war position.

Tancredo's new website (teamtancredo.org) merely features a brief statement from the candidate explaining that the decision to form a committee signals an "arduous and undeniably uphill battle."




Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


[edit on 1/17/2007 by djohnsto77]



posted on Jan, 17 2007 @ 07:57 AM
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posted by Justin Oldham

Interestingly enough, Tom Tancredo has tossed his hat into the ring. How does this affect your thoughts on GOP chances for 2008? How much of a contender is he, really? Or, is he just trawling for cash? Maybe he's bucking for a shot at some cabinet post if McCain wins?



Gerald Ford was the sole House member to be president, and he was not elected, but sort of got to be president by accident. I believe that is due to the structural differences between the Senate and the House. Two year terms versus 6 year terms. Excepting the smallest states - population wise - senators are the only candidates to run state-wide. It also works against House members because there are 435 + 5 in the House, making it hard to gain national attention, as opposed to 100 members in the Senate.

And finally, House rules give members very short time on the floor during important debates as opposed to the Senate where the person speaking is not under time constraints. How much can you say in 1 minute?

You may have seen my tally on “origins” of the presidents of the 20th century? I’ve re-figured it. The House furnished but 1 president out of 18. Yes, I included William McKinley. A senator. I now assign LBJ to the VP column. I put Nixon as a Senator. Go figure. Which I guess this shows how arbitrary life can be. Re-calculated origins: Gov. 6, VP, 5, Sen. 4, War hero 1, Politician (Hoover) 1 and House, 1.



posted by djohnsto77

Colorado Republican congressman Tom Tancredo's decision to form an exploratory committee in a possible run for the presidency came on the same day that Illinois junior Sen. Barack Obama, a Democrat, took the same step.

It is clear from the beginning why Tancredo is a possible candidate. He wants to advance some campaign issues, principally involving illegal immigration, that he sincerely believes would be overlooked otherwise. What Obama stands for, what has motivated his decision and fueled his ambition, is largely unknown. There is no question that he has the ability to stir a crowd and generate enthusiasm, but it is not clear where he stands on the important issues of the time, except for a distinctly anti-war position.
[Edited by Don W]

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.




A single issue candidate. I predict he will not last beyond the first round of primary selections. Iowa and New Hampshire plus the 3rd state, Nevada I believe, which has butted-in. Of course, this - Nevada - along with the choice of Denver over Clinton’s more logical New York City may well signal the Democrats have their eye on the Rocky Mountains and West as fertile territory in 2008.

The Democrat’s dilemma there is what to do about immigration that makes both economic sense and is fair to the undocumented workers already here. The war-hoop crowd in the South-west wants a Berlin Wall. But calmer heads realize we need the undocumented workers as much as they need us. We are symbiotic, like it or not.

The only thing I have ever heard from President Bush that was reasonable and logical is his proposal over the immigration morass facing the US. At the risk of repeating it, the Bush plan goes like this: undocumented workers would not be subject to criminal prosecution. This is immunity and not amnesty. They would register with the ICE, the replacement for the old INS. They would be fined, I’ve heard $500.00. A civil penalty. They would go to the bottom of the list for citizenship. But, they would be awarded legal status to remain in the US as guest workers.

Which is the second part of Bush’s proposal. A guest worker program allowing Latinos to enter and remain in the US provided they are employed. I suppose the guest worker would get a Green and White card? When the guest workers exceed the number of available jobs, then there would be a waiting list for entry. Anyone who messes up while here would be expelled and go to the bottom of the waiting list. Sounds good enough to me for a try.

But, will it get votes for the Dems in ‘08? First, I don’t believe the Dems will pass this dramatic reform act until mid-‘08 to get maximum benefit for doing something about what is perceived to be a problem spreading around the country. Recall last month’s ICE raids on 5 Swift and Company meat packing plants? Latinos have moved up from the stoop labor of harvesting our seasonal crops which was their first raison d’etre. Now they are doing semi-skilled labor at construction sites around the country. And just as at Swift and Company, so also I’d bet you a lot of money, you’d find them at Tyson and Perdue chicken plants around the country. Everyone of us benefits from the undocumented worker. America enjoys the cheapest and best food supply in the world! Proof positive? Heck, one-third or Americans are substantially overweight!



[edit on 1/17/2007 by donwhite]



posted on Jan, 18 2007 @ 12:38 AM
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Now that I've had a chance to look closer at the Tancredo exploratory effort, I'm convinced that he's doing it to trawl for money and to get a shot at somebody's cabinet in the event that a Republican wins the Presidency. The sad fact is that the GOP is so thoroughly divided at this point that they will most likely be their own worst enemies.



posted on Jan, 20 2007 @ 09:02 AM
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I am still waiting for good fresh candidate from the Republican side and so far I have seen names that I have no clue who they are or what they preach they are standing for.

I have seem more candidates from the Democrats than Republican yet.

What is going on.

Only a fresh face can beat Obama right not.

Has the Republican party become stagnat when it comes to candidates?



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 09:11 AM
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I was watching Mr. McCain on "Meet the Press" this weekend. His performance and attitude, combined with what I've learned from severla offline sources, leads me to believe he's losing faith in his chances for the GOP nomination. And...I think he might be right.

The GOP top brass is painfully aware of what's going to be said in tomorrow's State of the Union address. They're also cringing in advance of the expected national reaction. With this in mind, they may be shifting their support to Giuliani.

Rudy is smart enough to stay off the radar just now, which will serve him well if he realy does pull the pin. A source has told me that McCain might have been asked earlier this week to re-consider his Presidential run. I can't verify this, so take it with a grain of salt.

I've conducted a small survey of my own, and I've learned that people in my own neck of the woods are just plain fed up with what they see as do-nothing politics. That's country talk for "incompetence." I haven't heard this kind o ftalk since the days of Jimmy Carter. My worst fear is that tomorrows State of the Union speech will only put more nails the Republican coffin.



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 09:20 AM
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Originally posted by Justin Oldham
My worst fear is that tomorrows State of the Union speech will only put more nails the Republican coffin.


I agree, I remember a poster that mention something about the American idol having more popularity than the president.


If they have the people to chose between watching American idol and Bush state of the union you pretty much know what the obvious choice will be.


But is something I don't get, Bush is out of the door he is not for re-election, the Republican Party is in charge . . . so . . . they can control what Bush has to say.

But it seems to me that they either has lost control of Bush or is other powers working behind the president that the old leaders of the Republican party can not control or control them also.

Something weird going on since Bush has been president and the power of the Republican party base.


df1

posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 11:26 AM
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Originally posted by marg6043
But is something I don't get, Bush is out of the door he is not for re-election, the Republican Party is in charge . . . so . . . they can control what Bush has to say.

Unlike most parliamentary forms of government the individual is elected President in the US form of government, not a political party. The party can control the party platform prior to the election, but it has no power to force an individual to comply once he/she is elected President. Like wise the President has no direct power to force members of his party in the congress to support his programs.
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posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 11:31 AM
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Originally posted by df1
The party can control the party platform prior to the election, but it has no power to force an individual to comply once he/she is elected President. Like wise the President has no direct power to force members of his party in the congress to support his programs.
.


I see, but then it means that he may be working not in favor of his own political party under he was elected but whatever he feels like it after elections.

I got it.

Now doesn't this jeopardizes the Party as a whole unit? and the chances for other wannabees to be favor by the people?

When people vote for a particular candidate of a party they are not only voting for that candidate but also for the ideologies of the party that the candidate is supporting.



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 11:34 AM
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posted by marg6043

I remember a poster mentioned something about the American idol having more popularity than the president. If they have the people to chose between watching American idol and Bush State of the Union you pretty much know what the obvious choice will be. But is something I don't get, Bush is out of the door he is not for re-election, the Republican Party is in charge . . . so . . . they can control what Bush has to say. [Edited by Don W]



Under normal circumstances, I’d agree. But you saw what B43 did to the cover provided to him to extricate himself from Iraq by the bi-partisan Iraq Study Group? Rejected it outright! More of the same, he says. Like a crazed gambler betting his grocery money on the next card. This man is not normal. You laugh, but anyone who can sign 154 death warrants is not normal. 1 every 2 weeks for 6 years. You’re talking Saddam type.



But it seems to me that they have either lost control of Bush or other powers behind the president that the old leaders of the Republican party cannot control or that controls them also. Something weird going on since Bush has been president and the power of the Republican party base.



It’s Neo Cons. We never believed them. We never thought educated people would espoused a doctrine of American dominance of the world we never believe they meant to make this the American Century and they saw a 20 years window of opportunity. Apparently they are for real.

And this means Bush43 is one of the Neo Cons.

Nothing else explains him.


[edit on 1/22/2007 by donwhite]


df1

posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 11:54 AM
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Originally posted by marg6043
Now doesn't this jeopardizes the Party as a whole unit?

I'm sure it does jeopardize the strength of the party.



and the chances for other wannabees to be favor by the people?

It is occurring today. Republicans are abandoning the President on issues which they previously supported in order to win public favor.



When people vote for a particular candidate of a party they are not only voting for that candidate...

I can't speak for other people, but I vote for the candidate with no consideration of political party what so ever. If the ballot gave me the option of voting for "none of the above", I might never vote for anyone.
.



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 12:26 PM
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posted by df1

I'm sure it [Bush’s position] does jeopardize the strength of the [GOP] party. It [Republicans abandoning Bush] is occurring today. Republicans are abandoning the President on issues which they previously supported [him] in order to win public favor [in ‘08]. [Edited By Don W]



Aren’t we voters unfathomly quixotic? We get mad when politicians do not do our will, but when we change our minds, we berate politicians for changing theirs. As circumstances change, all sensible people must reconsider earlier decisions to see if that still fits. I think changes in circumstances or conditions must dictate what a person decides to do. Unlike socks, in life one size does not fit all.



I can't speak for other people, but I vote for the candidate with no consideration of political party whatsoever . . “



Au contraire! Consider: Modern Democrats claim lineage back to T Jefferson. But Jefferson supported the weak central government concept of governance. Modern Republicans claim lineage back to A Lincoln. But Lincoln supported the strong central government concept. So you see, today’s Democrats would be more comfortable with Abraham Lincoln and today’s Republicans would be more comfortable with Thomas Jefferson. You figure!

I am a party man. Parties endure. People come and go. Issues change. But parties are more likely to keep the same principles over time or evolve to meet changing needs. It so happens I agree with more of the Democratic Party’s principles than I do with the Republican Party. So, for me, it is safer to vole the party than it is to vote the man.

I attribute the mean-spirited politics of today to voting the transient man and disregarding the enduring party.



[edit on 1/22/2007 by donwhite]


df1

posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by donwhite
Aren’t we voters unfathomly quixotic? We get mad when politicians do not do our will, but when we change our minds, we berate politicians for changing theirs.

You are mouthing the standard establishment rhetoric, "It's the voters fault".



I think changes in circumstances or conditions must dictate what a person decides to do.

I never said otherwise.



Au contraire! Consider: Modern Democrats claim lineage back to T Jefferson.

They can both trace their linage back to the GEICO cavemen for all I care, but be sure to let me know if T Jefferson reincarnates and runs for office as a Democrat.



Parties endure.

Convince me this is a good thing.



It so happens I agree with more of the Democratic Party’s principles than I do with the Republican Party.

What principles might those be? It seems to me that both parties are lacking in principles judging by their actions rather than their words.



So, for me, it is safer to vole the party than it is to vote the man.

Also voting for the myth of what your political party of choice is suppose to represent doesn't require any analysis or thinking, so it is much easier. None of that messy and confusing evaluating the actual positions of the candidates.



I attribute the mean-spirited politics of today to voting the transient man and disregarding the enduring party.

I attribute it to both parties being self serving corrupt dens of inequity with no interest other than perpetuating themselves and the party.
.



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 01:53 PM
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It's a shame that the people who win public office aren't the real powers-that-be. It's too bad they can't be their own men and women. The truth is that today's elected officials are, for the most part; middlemen in a process that has become corrupt.

The fact of the matter is that we the voters are supposed to cast our ballots for the other guy when the dominant party makes things worse. It's just not enough for President Bush to be wrongor mistaken. On his watch, his party has failed to DO much of anything. They ere content to keep it that way, no matter who spoke up or gave them a nudge.

I'm not the only one who sees the disintigration of the Republican party. It's been coming for quite some time. Don and I have talked about it off and on over u2 for several months. There IS a form of partisan warfare going on in this country, and the stakes are very high. The Democrats are now poised to win this undeclared war. As per my CM thesis, it's been going on since before the ink dried on the Constitution.

The GOP nominee for President in 2008 will be a sacrificial lamb. The only way any Republican candidate (including Rudy) could have any hope of winning involves some very nasty tactics. They'd have to eviscerate Bush43 and continue their attacks non-stop while at the same time preaching hot and heavy reform. Even then, they still don't enhance their odds enough to beat a ham sandwich (with or without cheese, assuming that the ham sandwich had no connections to Abramof).

If I could give one piece of advice to the GOP leadership, it would be one word. Re-invent.



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 02:07 PM
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posted by df1

You are mouthing standard establishment rhetoric . . They can both trace their linage but be sure to let me know if Jefferson reincarnates and runs as a Democrat. It seems to me both parties are lacking in principles . . voting for the myth of what your political party of choice represents doesn't require any thinking so it is much easier. None of that confusing evaluating the actual positions of the candidates . . I attribute to both parties being self serving corrupt dens of inequity with no interest other than perpetuating themselves and the party.[Edited by Don W]



Political parties formed in the US by the time of the 2nd election in 1792. The current parties are basically the Goldwater (GOP) and Clinton (Dems) parties. Because America is more right rather than left, the GOP starts out in front and the Dems must always play catch-up. Since Goldwater in 1964, the GOP has held the WH 28 years (by 2008) to the Dems 16 years. I’m looking forward to another 8 years under Clinton beginning in 2009.

Americans do not like 3rd parties. Once, in 1824, James Monroe was elected as the candidate of both parties. Equal to George Washington's first election in 1789 when he carried all the states voting. There has never been a 3rd party candidate elected, unless you call Abraham Lincoln's Republican Party of 1860 a 3rd party. Two times since Lincoln 3rd parties have been spoilers. In 1912, Teddy Roosevelt’s Bull Moose Party gave the election to Wilson and in 2000, Ralph Nader's Green Party gave the election to Bush43. Perot played no role in the outcome of the 1992 election although he polled more votes that any prior 3rd party.


[edit on 1/22/2007 by donwhite]


df1

posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by donwhite
Political parties formed in the US by the time of the 2nd election in 1792.

Political parties are not inherently bad. The problem with political parties in the US is that two particular political parties have been institutionalized at the expense of all of others parties and ideologies. The media and corporatism also play a role in this Demopublican corruption of our political process, but I will hold those thoughts for a more appropriate thread.



I’m looking forward to another 8 years under Clinton beginning in 2009.

Be careful what you ask for, you just might get it. But I doubt that you will get Hillary.
.



posted on Jan, 22 2007 @ 04:00 PM
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posted by Justin Oldham

It's a shame that the people who win public office aren't the real powers-that-be. It's too bad they can't be their own men and women. The truth is that today's elected officials are, for the most part, middlemen in a process that has become corrupt. [Edited by Don W]



Exactly. But when did it go awry? Teddy Roosevelt was his own man and made the back-room boys mad. TR picked Taft, but was dissatisfied with his performance. That clash gave the US Wilson. Wilson was an unlikely candidate. Beholden the Wm J Bryan, he made him Sec of State until he quit. We’ve heard of Col. House and Mrs. Wilson, but recent historians argue Wilson was aware of what was happening in his behalf, contributing if not orchestrating. Harding was hand picked. Maybe they thought the Cox - FDR ticket would win? Was Harding a throw-away? Coolidge of course was VP who ascended on Harding’s death. Completely unexcepted. Like Gerald Ford. Herbert Hoover was a popular politico from War 1 days of feeding the hungry Belgians. His later engineers in work in the Soviet Union was sharply downplayed. Which brings us to FDR. The guys who had put forth Al Smith in ‘28 would have been discredited. But still, NY seems to have ruled the roost in Dem politics, both Smith and FDR being recent governors. Hey, it’s the Empire State. I have always called NYC the capital of the world. Beijing would fit in the Bronx. Tokyo has been the only threat to that title, but when the real estate bubble burst, Tokyo was out and remains out. HST was hand picked, maybe not by FDR but by anti-socialists - all of FDR’s cabinet but Wallace - to be a reliable successor to FDR who everyone says knew would not finish out his term. HST while his own man, I believe, was also a Democratic Party team player. It was 1952 when the GOP with Eisenhower began the “vote the man” mantra. Before that it was “party loyalty.” Adlai Stevenson, the first presidential candidate I voted for (1956), was hand picked by HST. Although JFK was “vetted” in WVa and elsewhere for his religion, he was also a choice of the behind-the-scenes types who felt “safe” with him, the 2nd son of Old Joe. Who got called home from the Court of St. James at the private request of the Brits for his pro fascist leanings kept none to secret. LBJ got where he got on his own. If there was any behind the scenes operative in his tenure, he was the man! I cannot imagine LBJ taking orders from anyone. Nixon was just as canny as LBJ. He likewise held political power in a tight hand. He did not have to consult outside himself for advice how to deal with any problems. Well, maybe he yielded to Henry Kissinger on foreign affairs. I have a feeling Henry the K was more a boot licker than a policy innovator. I heard Henry admit once that he and Nixon had no “plan” to end and extricate the US out of Vietnam in 1968, that it was a pure political ploy to get elected. But I don’t blame Nixon for doing that. The Dems had no plan either, and it was the Dems who had escalated the War several orders of magnitude past Eisenhower’s minimal involvement. Dems like to point to Ike as the first one to tippy-toe into Vietnam, but it was the Dems who put 550,000 troops there. I do criticize Nixon for delaying our exit, as the voters had put him in office thinking he had promised to end the war quickly, little did they know it would go on 6 more years and 22,000 additional KIA. For that I eternally fault Nixon. Not Watergate. I accept Nixon was correct when he lamely excused himself saying others had done as bad. But they had not been caught red-handed. Gerald Ford was chosen because, after Spiro Agnew and knowing the troubles Nixon was facing, the only “safe” choice was Ford, made by others, unnamed, but I heard Nixon wanted John Connolly. That was like choosing between light and dark. We the people won that one! But look how close we came to losing. Ugh. Jimmy Carter was the first president to win through the newly democratized primary process. The back room boys still are not in total controls of the process, but I feel they have learned that in the end, its money that counts. And controls. If we could identify the top 100 or 200 contributors, then you’d have the mover sand shakers of either party. You’d be surprised how many times the same name would show up on both sides of the aisle. Hey, if you are a billionaire, you don’t give a dam about health care unless you own Humana. Or globalization. You’re already deep into that. Money-wise. You already got the best tax deal on earth, 5% income tax rate on money earned outside the US. Sheee-it. Or a flat tax if you stay home, 15% on dividends. That’s why the flat tax movement has died. They already have it. Reagan was a total opportunist with no shame. I cite the welfare Cadillac story that made him governor then after ruining the UC system, the finest public university system the world, he became president with the inestimable help of Ayatollah Kohmeni. Bush41 barely escaped facing the bar of justice, lest he pardon Weinberger and his 6 compatriots who had no doubt told GHW Bush, we’re not taking this rap for you, alluding to the Iran-Contra shenanigans. To which B41 said, “It’s in the mail.” Bill Clinton did not have the big money boys on-board at first, and whether he ever did is irrelevant because Bill realized he could not be a second FDR but could be another smiling Jimmy Carter with chutzpah. With finesse and a stomach of steel - and 2,920 days of endless GOP harassment and phoney investigations which ought to entitle him to at least the Silver Star. Bush43 we know is America’s first designated president. The Supreme Court elected him, 5 to 4. The lesson I hope every politico has learned form this man is not to lie to the public. That is B43's big problem now. No mater what he says, he lied too many times, no one can believe or trust him now. If he had any character - liars usually do not - he would resign. Bush43 did the worst of all possible lies - he lied gratuitously. That’s a lie when one is not needed. 3,030 KIA and counting. His father has tried to extricate him from Iraq but I’m satisfied B43 is the primo Neo Con and has not intention of leaving Iraq. That is the only explanation unless you subscribe to him being mad after ordering 154 executions. A record.
E N D


[edit on 1/22/2007 by donwhite]



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