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What is a morgan silver dollar worth?

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posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 02:42 AM
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Just curious. What is one of these things worth anyways?





posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 02:52 AM
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depends completely on the grade of silver used, the condition of the coin, the rariety of it, all kinds of stuff....but i dont see how this has anything to do with secret societies.



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 02:55 AM
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Originally posted by umwolves123
depends completely on the grade of silver used, the condition of the coin, the rariety of it, all kinds of stuff....but i dont see how this has anything to do with secret societies.


Yeah I don't know either.

Now imagine that the woman has a hole punched in her eye. Almost like she can't see, ya see.

[edit on 9-8-2006 by In nothing we trust]



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 02:56 AM
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ok...after doing about an hours worth of searching for information on this coin you've shown i've only one question...WHY on earth are you calling this a "morgan" silver dollar?



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 03:01 AM
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Originally posted by In nothing we trust

Originally posted by umwolves123
depends completely on the grade of silver used, the condition of the coin, the rariety of it, all kinds of stuff....but i dont see how this has anything to do with secret societies.


Yeah I don't know either.

Now imagine that the woman has a hole punched in her eye. Almost like she can't see, ya see.

[edit on 9-8-2006 by In nothing we trust]


No, i dont see. what the hell are you talking about?

you just said you dont know what this has to do with secret societies then why did you post it? Are you even from this planet? what on earth are you talking about?



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 03:03 AM
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Originally posted by umwolves123
ok...after doing about an hours worth of searching for information on this coin you've shown i've only one question...WHY on earth are you calling this a "morgan" silver dollar?


You didn't do an hours worth of searching. I just posted this.



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 03:07 AM
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your right it was only about 15 min. but it sure seemed like an hour....but you still fail to answer what this has to do with secret societies and why you call this a "morgan" coin.



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 03:24 AM
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Originally posted by umwolves123
ok...after doing about an hours worth of searching for information on this coin you've shown i've only one question...WHY on earth are you calling this a "morgan" silver dollar?


It is a Morgan Head silver dollar. They can be called Liberty heads but the more popular is Morgan Head Dollar. I think a guy by the name of Morgan designed the coin itself. I have a few in my collection.


Pie



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 03:25 AM
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Originally posted by umwolves123
your right it was only about 15 min. but it sure seemed like an hour....but you still fail to answer what this has to do with secret societies and why you call this a "morgan" coin.


The date.

Morgan silver dollars were minted between 1878 and 1921, with a notable break between 1905 and 1920.



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 04:41 AM
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15 minutes? Are you daft.
I took 5 seconds and searched it up on Ebay
search.ebay.com...
about 13-50 dollars (American)

Edit: there are naturaly a few notable exceptions, such as this one
cgi.ebay.com... m
it's marked at $1,600 (it's a set of 8 mind you)

[edit on 9-8-2006 by avonwodahs]



posted on Aug, 9 2006 @ 04:54 AM
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Hey while we are on the subject, I have a coin...



The minting of token was illegal in 1799 and a few private mints made them anyway, but it has made finding anything out about this coin damned near impossible. Its a 1799 Coventry Half-Penny, the back has an Elephant, a common enough coin but not that year. If I told you how we found it you would call me crazy. Is it worth anything?

Also I think the original poster is perhaps making reference perhaps to Columbia?

Edit: Crap that image is huge, sorry about that. Can we resize it without screwing up my upload points somehow?

[edit on 9-8-2006 by twitchy]



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 01:24 AM
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Originally posted by avonwodahs

search.ebay.com...

about 13-50 dollars (American)

Edit: there are naturaly a few notable exceptions, such as this one
cgi.ebay.com... m

it's marked at $1,600 (it's a set of 8 mind you)


Hmmm, I would have said it was only worth $1.

Perhaps I missed something?



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 01:26 AM
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Originally posted by twitchy
Hey while we are on the subject, I have a coin...



The minting of token was illegal in 1799 and a few private mints made them anyway, but it has made finding anything out about this coin damned near impossible. Its a 1799 Coventry Half-Penny, the back has an Elephant, a common enough coin but not that year. If I told you how we found it you would call me crazy. Is it worth anything?


PRO BONO PUBLICO

What's that mean; "FOR THE GOOD OF THE PUBLIC"?



posted on Aug, 11 2006 @ 01:35 AM
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Originally posted by In nothing we trust

Originally posted by umwolves123
depends completely on the grade of silver used, the condition of the coin, the rariety of it, all kinds of stuff....but i dont see how this has anything to do with secret societies.


Now imagine that the woman has a hole punched in her eye. Almost like she can't see, ya see.




Statue of Liberty visitors can access these areas:
1. PROMENADE
2. OBSERVATORY

3. The Statue's crown and torch are not open.



posted on Aug, 12 2006 @ 12:55 AM
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On ebay they were selling some old I think penny with an all seeing eye design anyone ever seen it?

Early masonic UK half pence





More to do nothing with the topic or forum I really like those patinum liberty coins. Why are they called dime or five dollar gold pieces when they are sold for a crap load more?

How can I get a platinum liberty coin from the mint when they come out and how much would they charge? I remember when the new quarters come out everyone can get one for free somehow due to dealer hogs? Correct me if I am wrong I am just blabbin now

Platinum coin




[edit on 12-8-2006 by masonite]

[edit on 12-8-2006 by masonite]



posted on Sep, 9 2006 @ 11:00 PM
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quote: Originally posted by In nothing we trust

quote: Originally posted by In nothing we trust
quote: Originally posted by umwolves123
depends completely on the grade of silver used, the condition of the coin, the rariety of it, all kinds of stuff....but i dont see how this has anything to do with secret societies.


Now imagine that the woman has a hole punched in her eye. Almost like she can't see, ya see.




Statue of Liberty visitors can access these areas:
1. PROMENADE
2. OBSERVATORY

3. The Statue's crown and torch are not open.


First you're talking about coins, and then this. Why? i think you're just some random guy trying to find conspiracy in any and everything and that you're full of it. I mean c'mon this is the Secret Societies section, not the what's this coin worth section. Then you go completely off your own topic to the crown and torch of the statue of liberty. I've seen some of your other posts too. I'm pretty sure you've probly broken some rules of the forum and I dont understand why some mods dont block you out already.



posted on Sep, 11 2006 @ 12:38 AM
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Originally posted by In nothing we trust
Hmmm, I would have said it was only worth $1.

Perhaps I missed something?


Something crafted over a hundred years ago can be worth quite a bit more than face value to a collector, especially if made in limited quantities (like most coins).

I still fail to see what this, or the cryptic bit about the statue of liberty has to do with this forum.



posted on Sep, 11 2006 @ 12:43 AM
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Old coins are valued on just a few simple guidelines:

1) Rarity
2) Desirability among collectors
3) Condition of the coin
4) Precious metal content
5) Any unique proved storyline of the coin (such as a Presidential gift to a foreign leader)


I think that's it.

Most Morgan dollars are relatively common and don't sell for much more than the worth of their silver content, although rare dates and/or mint marks could raise the value dramatically.



posted on Sep, 11 2006 @ 02:15 AM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77

Any unique proved storyline of the coin

Most Morgan dollars are relatively common


Ya I think that's it.

Morgans are fairly common aren't they.

As a matter of fact they are so common that it would be impossible to even guesstimate who might have one, with a unique storyline, or where they may all be located.

How could you ever differentiate between a common coin, that is valued for it's silver content or collectibility, and one that has a unique storyline?

Or maybe a single morgan is just really old money.




[edit on 11-9-2006 by In nothing we trust]



posted on Sep, 11 2006 @ 03:15 AM
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Originally posted by In nothing we trust
As a matter of fact they are so common that it would be impossible to even guesstimate who might have one, with a unique storyline, or where they may all be located.


Sure, as with any currency.

I have at least a hundred Morgans tucked away in a safe deposit box. My grandmother collected them, and later gave them to me... there is no official record of the 'transaction', my possession of them, or the disposition of them.



How could you ever differentiate between a common coin, that is valued for it's silver content or collectibility, and one that has a unique storyline?


Well, the only way would be for some sort of certification, an affidavit of the storyline. These claims can be very hard to prove, so unless the cert is from a very credible source, I'd say buyer beware.



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