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Eastern Candadians are Ingrates!

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posted on Oct, 16 2006 @ 07:08 PM
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Let's here it for Duzey.

Woot Woot!

Were you doing google searches on Cape Breton?

Be Honest!





posted on Oct, 16 2006 @ 07:32 PM
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I hadn't read this thread until today. Props
: size large. This is the sort of discussion that promotes a better understanding between folks within Canada and as a bonus may dispel some inaccurate notions that our valued neighbours to the South may or may not hold. Canadians know more about America than Americans do about Canadians and it's partly our fault.

The unity of Canada as a sovereign nation, has it's place, so does provincialism, regionalism (witch can go beyond municipalites to include provinces), municipal-ism, right on down to the 'hood and it's ethno-mix.

Canada is a unique exotic - a young experiment that by most accounts seems to be going better than some. On this planet we are the last "frontier" worth anything in an "American" sort of way.

The greatest asset we have is each other. We primarily live in the Southern-most 10% of the nation. We have provinces and municipalities large and small. Some provinces will fit in some municipalties population-wise.

Each, person and their perspective in Canada is unique with a bunch of great things that makes them who they are... some "character" traits are regional and cultural, geographic, some political, some economic and some have bias.

Or I should say I at least have bias of pride in my country, my province and my municipality, my street... especially the people, all the people... our differences are our strongest asset.

Can Canada have a singular international "identity"? We are a blend of old world colonization after aboriginal-cultural-displacement legacy (which is a poor, but spirited start) and a vibrant and continuing 3rd generation of immigration.

This blend if properly promoted in a balanced and sustainable way means we are very well connected to the rest of the world in culture and business... immigrant Canadians phone home too and sell stuff, lots of stuff.

It's a bit like with the Americans and is based on perception, preception and misconceptions and some truth. All the good parts are true and looking at the thread the bad parts are exceptions and over-generalization of variuos groups of folks... you know those"other" Canadians, not like us "good or better" Canadians.

If you can take the time, travel Canada, a bit at a time. I have not been to the Yukon... savin' that for before I die. I haven't been to PEI but I'm headed there next summer for some work.

We have a wonderful international reputation until recently and this misconception that we have somehow changed in any substantial way since 911 as a nation-people IS NOT OF OUR DOING. Look South and think politics and media and power. They're lookin' North. Me too, way North. We don't start stuff, we finish stuff.

Like The USA, Canada's consuner goods mostly come from Taiwan and China through the Pacific Gateway which needs a radical upgrade to handle the trade with Asia.

We ship way more cars to the states than they ship here and they're of Japanese and Korean and Canadian corporate identity. There is Ford Canada, General Motors Canda, and Diamler-Benz of Canada, oh yeah, and the important one Magna, parts by Stronach. Quebec is Bombardier... how America takes the train to work... and flies regionally. We are a net exporter of oil and gas. We have the best economy in the G8 in regard to debt. Water? Most fresh water in the world. What's not to like? Some.

We have diversified our trade through culture well and it is becoming more diverse - good. Since we are made of all the peoples of the world this gives us an incredible and growing advantage for culture and commerce. Lots and lots of niches and we are in most and doing so on good terms.

Bad stuff - our fishers, farmers, arborial and manufacturing economies are in dire trouble and I can not understand the reluctance to help or defend or assist to transition these Canadain industries that we all have benefited from in Canadian history.

Canada is young and exotic (NFLD didn't confederate till 1949) and a little temperamental till she gets warmed up but drop the clutch and there's plenty torque... and lots of fuel. "Who" we are is a strategic asset. There is more "Who" in Canada than any other single nation. We're just getting started.

Victor K.

43'

[edit on 16-10-2006 by V Kaminski]



posted on Oct, 16 2006 @ 07:59 PM
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Nope, no Google searches required.


I own several Pictou history books. My grandmother likes to go through them with me and rant about how much she dislikes James M. Cameron.

My mother and uncle went there a few years ago to scatter my aunt's ashes in the Northumberland Strait. She was living in Sask. when she died, for work, but she spent every vacation on Pictou.


My theory on why most of us live close to the US border: We're cuddling for warmth. It gets cold up here in the winter.



posted on Oct, 16 2006 @ 08:05 PM
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I recently moved up to Truro, Nova Scotia.

Not far from Pictou at all. Any messages you need relayed? I don't mind opening the window and throwing a few shout outs.



posted on Oct, 16 2006 @ 08:07 PM
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Truro has great cheese.
My grandmother used to send it to me on the bus.

I'm not sure why.



posted on Oct, 17 2006 @ 09:49 AM
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Originally posted by V Kaminski

If you can take the time, travel Canada, a bit at a time. I have not been to the Yukon... savin' that for before I die. I haven't been to PEI but I'm headed there next summer for some work.
Victor K.

43'
[edit on 16-10-2006 by V Kaminski]


Great post V. I just wanted to comment on seeing the country. 2 summers ago my gf and I drove from Nova Scotia all the way out to Vancouver Island. It was one of the most incredible trips we've ever had. We kinda did a loop. On the way out we went up through northern Quebec and Ont. and on the way back came back through southern Sask. and Ottawa. A once in a life time kinda thing. It took us 2 months and it was costly. But we didn't just drive across, we tried to stop and "experience" the different parts of this great counrty. Including white water rafting and walking on a glacier! Just seeing the rockies up close made my jaw drop for a good hour. LOL!
Anyway I would highly recomend this to any Canadian who can afford the journey. But gas isn't getting any cheaper. When we went it was in the 70s cents area.
Canada is a beautiful and safe place to travel. We haven't seen the Yukon either but it looks amazing. I imagin taking the train across the country would be great as well if you had the time.


[edit on 10/17/2006 by librasleep]



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