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6,500 Year Old Anchor Stones in FLorida

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posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 10:17 PM
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If a need were to arise to move a stone of that size, say building a road; it could be a good idea to drill a couple of holes into that soft limestone to move it with a crane and rigging. Just a thought. Perhaps the last one remaining and it was so big they just left it in the median?




posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 10:22 PM
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Ok, lets suppose that despite Byrd's comment about the last dunking of the area, and that at some time it was close enough to a water way to be of use.

Those holes are remarkably well preserved, and little other form to the stone.
Generally, I believe moor lines are in line with each other, more or less.

So... dunno what it's from. But it doesn't seem to be 6,000 years old.



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 10:36 PM
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Turns out my memory is not as bad as I had thought. 17 1/2 inches just happens to be a common size for well drilling bits and core drill bits of that size are also available.

I worked on oil rigs in my youth and I remembered correctly that the bits were 17 1/2 inches. These bits are also used to drill water wells and for masonry work. They are tri-cone bits and the 17 1/2 inch size is what is normally used for oil and large water wells.

A site that sells reconditioned bits like I'm referring too.

These exact bits in that size have been around since 1933 when invented by Hugh's of Hugh's Tool. The rigs I worked on used them. Same size.



posted on May, 3 2009 @ 08:07 AM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 


After a long absence from the ATS boards I return to find that this old post was still being discussed. Thank you for your answer. I think the drill bit info nails this one down. Sounds like the stone was rip-rap dug up during the road construction that had been drilled through at an earlier time.



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