New Aurora evidence?

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posted on Jun, 29 2009 @ 06:29 AM
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Hi everyone , I have been researching the Aurora Hyperjet For 11 or 12 Monthes now and i am quite certain that it exists . judging by the evidence and the matching stories. Last Year I lived On RAF Waddington Base in Lincolnshire ,England . i was coming home from school when i heard the noise of a Engine i had never recognised i saw a shape somewhere between the lines of a YF-23 and a F-117 fly through the sky at about 70 degrees. the plane was completely blach with a silver steel air intake at the belly of the craft. i was going for my phone when the guard grabbed my hand and stole the phone off of me until the aircraft was out of sight.

Could this have Been the Aurora ?
What was it doing in England?

Goodbye for now
Tom , 12 years old




posted on Jun, 29 2009 @ 06:39 AM
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Originally posted by FredT
Cool. The reason I asked is the following: Im a avid fan of the SR-71/A-12 and can't remeber if they left contrails at operational altitudes.


Old post I know, but worth clarifying anyway...

The SR-71 and A-12 aircraft had a periscope for the pilot to see behind him, and one of the operationa parameters they had to meet before entering the 'sensitive area' was that they were not producing a contrail. If they were, they would adjust the flight parameters to reduce or eliminate it (accelerate, slow down, change height et al).



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by ShadowXIX
 


I had a thought about the Aurora and similar hypersonic objects, and I'm starting to think that the classic Aurora we've all come to know is actually just a technology demonstrator for a few new different things. Like, but not limited to
Pulse detonation engines
New high temp skins
Both active and passive STEALTH systems
possible re-entry and space flight(low orbit high atmosphere)
hypersonic, supersonic GPS weapons delivery
Unmanned flight
Hypersonic Anti Satellite warfare. In a Dogfights of the Future episode they were talking about a hypothetical air to air encounter between two hypersonic aircraft that used lasers to destoy their targets(Satellites, missles and other things one would find going really high and really fast, like saucers)

I'm also open to the possiblity that AURORA is not just one aircraft/ship but rather a small squadron of similar aircraft.
edit on 10-3-2011 by StratosFear because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 03:06 PM
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Put some comments from difffrent peope in a video clip, maybe this will add light to to Aurora.

www.youtube.com...



posted on Mar, 11 2011 @ 06:28 AM
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Originally posted by StratosFear
reply to post by ShadowXIX
 


I'm also open to the possiblity that AURORA is not just one aircraft/ship but rather a small squadron of similar aircraft.


If it exists, its most certainly not going to be a single aircraft, its going to be a small fleet of aircraft much as the A-12 and SR-71 fleets were (13 A-12s, 32 SR-71s). Even if the aircraft hasn't actually made it into production, its going to be a prototype fleet of 4 - 8 aircraft simply because you cannot carry out a comprehensive fligth test regime with just one or two aircraft - the aircraft need down time for maintenance, for instrumentation changes and for validation.

The only possibility that it is a single aircraft is if it was a technology demonstrator that flew for short periods of time during the 1980s or 1990s and has since been retired, much like the YF-22A and YF-23A was (although even those had multiple examples of aircraft).

So there exists four possibilities:

1. Aurora flew for a short period of time as a technology demonstrator or development aircraft and was retired. What was it replaced with?

2. Aurora flew for a short period of time as a technology demonstrator or development aircraft and was retired. Nothing replaced it.

3. Aurora is the name for an aircraft type, which went into production after the development phase. This would necessitate a fleet of aircraft to maintain availability.

4. Aurora never existed.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by StratosFear
 


The problem of using lasers as a weapon is though they can be very effective, they need both, an amazing amount of energy and a clear weather, if visibility is low (like a foggy climate) the laser will be useless.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by mbartelsm
 


At high speed static and heat can build up, also a reason for some of these "black project" aircraft is that they could have nuclear based powerplants which could provide huge amounts of power.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 08:11 PM
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By now there is probably a high speed recon UCAV that could carry out the mission the SR-71 and any "planned" manned recon aircraft. But before it could fly there would have been a need for tech. demonstrators to gather data and test airframe shape, powerplant, etc. People have been seeing some kind of aircraft producing the distinctive contrails and maybe one day we can all find out for sure.
Look at the need for a capability that needs filled and follow the technology and money. Skunk Works has plenty of secrets.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 04:44 AM
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Originally posted by StratosFear
People have been seeing some kind of aircraft producing the distinctive contrails and maybe one day we can all find out for sure.


The thing about the whole "distinctive contrail" issue is that its trivially easy to eliminate contrail formation from an aircraft these days if you want to do so - the B-2 includes such technology (it injects a chemical into the engine exhaust which suppresses contrail formation) and it was being trialled on the SR-71 before it was retired (contrail formation was a big issue for the SR-71).

I have for a long time considered the contrail issue a false one - I have seen so many weird and wonderful contrails that have been 100% identified as coming from civil passenger aircraft that I don't believe reports to be substantially exciting any more.



posted on Mar, 23 2011 @ 11:09 PM
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I know there is a lot of emphsis these days being paid to the contrail/chemtrail phenomena, but looking at this picture, no matter how fast the platform is stated as moving, that contrail just should not hold up that well, over that distance, no matter what may have created it.



posted on Mar, 23 2011 @ 11:47 PM
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ive seen normal airplanes leave this type of trail. not one that cuts through clouds, but the swirly cord like, almost as if pulsed trail before.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 10:12 AM
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Could it be?














posted on Apr, 28 2012 @ 08:05 PM
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Well, nothing new in 6 years. I wonder if it is dismantled, or never existed. Or maybe it is still going around at 6 times the speed of sound. One would think it would be detectable to the newer systems that the public has access to.



posted on May, 3 2012 @ 06:24 AM
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reply to post by freewareism77
 


Possibly space junk, but still, most intriguing...



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 04:04 PM
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I have read two comments from two different persons at different instances that SR-71 had much more capability then it ever was hinted to have. Speeds in the range of mach 8. So SR-71 could have been the source of that contrail...



posted on Jul, 16 2012 @ 06:26 PM
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reply to post by A-star
 


Nonsense. The SR-71 was not designed to sustain hypersonic speeds.

All Blackbird variants were designed to obtain maximum cruise performance around Mach 3.2 at altitudes from 74,000 to 85,000 feet. The external configuration, engine air inlet system, powerplant, and fuel sequencing were optimized for performance at Mach 3.2 and the airplane attained true airspeeds near 1,850 knots.

In 1965, a CIA pilot flew an A-12 to a maximum speed of Mach 3.29 (2,171 mph). According to the SR-71 pilot’s handbook (flight manual), Mach 3.17 was the maximum recommended cruise speed for normal operations. The pilot, however, could increase speed to Mach 3.3 as long as the engine compressor inlet temperature did not exceed 427 degrees C. Speeds exceeding Mach 3.3 were occasionally recorded during test flights, but these operations put excessive thermal stress on the airframe.

In July 1976, relatively cool outside air temperatures allowed an Air Force crew to set an official speed record in the SR-71A, accelerating to Mach 3.32 (2,193 miles per hour). This record stood even after the airplane’s official retirement flight in March 1990 set a 1,998-mile straight-course speed record from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., in just over 64 minutes at an average speed of 2,144 miles per hour.



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 04:55 AM
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Nonsense or not, think about the design of XB-71 Valkyrie which was a mach 3 plane and the design of SR-71, and the difference stand out pretty much and the SR-71 seems to be made for much larger speed.

Just saying...



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 05:22 AM
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reply to post by A-star
 


And the B-1 was supposed to be a Mach 2 bomber, and looks like a Mach 2 bomber, but can barely make Mach 1 with a tailwind. Just because something LOOKS a certain way doesn't make it true. The SR-71 was a Mach 3 aircraft, and would have torn apart flying at the speeds that some people claim it could do.



posted on Jul, 17 2012 @ 08:26 AM
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reply to post by A-star
 


Unlike the XB-70, the SR-71 was designed to be stealthy as well as fast. That is what ultimately drove the aircraft's configuration. Kelly Johnson went through a dozen different design iterations before arriving at something that satisfied the customer requirements for speed, altitude, and low radar signature. His A-11 model was rejected because it would have had such a large radar reflection that the Soviets might have mistaken it for a bomber like the B-70. The A-12 (forerunner of the SR-71) included shaping and materials that made it less visible to long range tracking radar such as the Soviet P-14 Oborona. It doesn't matter that it looks like it could go faster than it does, or that the pilot could get more thrust out of the engines. There were thermal limitations for the airframe and powerplant that could not be exceeded.


In 1975 Lockheed attempted to determine the feasibility of extending the Blackbird’s speed and altitude capabilities. The results of several studies concluded the airplane’s maximum speed limit could be extended to Mach 3.5 for short periods of time. The only structural limit to speeds above Mach 3.5 was a KEAS (knots equivalent air sped) limit of 420, set by inlet duct pressures and temperatures that exceeded acceptable values. Limited inlet capture-area and excessive engine compressor inlet temperatures (427 degrees C maximum) also limited operations at higher Mach numbers.

Similar studies addressed the possibility of achieving flight in the SR-71 well above 85,000 feet. Results indicated the SR-71 could briefly reach an altitude of about 95,000 feet in a zoom climb profile. The proposed mission could have been accomplished with an airplane at a gross weight of 85,000 pounds. According to the flight profile, the pilot would accelerate from Mach 3.2 to Mach 3.5 at an altitude of 80,000 feet, then zoom to 95,000 feet as speed decreased to normal cruise Mach numbers. The airplane would subsequently settle back down to an altitude of about 84,000 feet. Sustained flight at altitudes above 85,000 feet was limited by wing surface area and engine thrust capabilities. The A-12, a single seat/single sensor airplane was 2,000 pounds lighter than the SR-71 and could easily attain 90,000 feet (and did on at least one occasion).





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