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Freezing people

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posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 01:27 AM
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Has anyone actually been frozen and been melted years later and is the exactly the same as what they where when they where frozen. eg- On austin powers....




posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 03:17 AM
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hello my fellow aussie, u in perth and go for western bulldogs? strange!

no, the technology to revive someone hasn't been invented.
thats why some companys offer to freeze people for the future when there might be a way to bring people alive from being frozen

[edit on 19/1/06 by voodoo child]



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 04:32 AM
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I think that the Russians did freeze a dog and revive it once. The issue is that the cells begin to break down after a certain amount of time being frozen, or if not frozen quickly enough; at that point you cannot revive the person/animal.



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 04:57 AM
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So you can get freezed now, and then you can ask to be unfreezed when they find a way to unfreeze people? I wouldn't mind doing that when I'm old.

Does it hurt getting freezed though? Or would they put you asleep first?
God, could you imagine looking at life as you'd last see it, even though you havn't died?



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 05:22 AM
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Originally posted by Nventual
So you can get freezed now, and then you can ask to be unfreezed when they find a way to unfreeze people? I wouldn't mind doing that when I'm old.

Does it hurt getting freezed though? Or would they put you asleep first?
God, could you imagine looking at life as you'd last see it, even though you havn't died?


The Russians did this with dogs, German Shepards to be exact. Almost all of them died from the process. I believe they got one revived.
Right now, it’s only done to people after death, and its extremely expensive. Disney, some baseball player, and I believe Roy Rogers have had this done with their bodies after dying. It is not done while the person is still living, as that would be considered murder since the person literally dies in the process. As to the pain, I cannot think of too many ways to die that would be very pleasant, it would be about as painful as freezing to death…



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 05:28 AM
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There'd be a long gap between when they can freeze people and bring them back, and when they can bring back people from the dead.



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 05:34 AM
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www.alcor.org...

Alcor Life Extension Foundation

The Alcor Life Extension Foundation is the world leader in cryonics, cryonics research, and cryonics technology. Cryonics is the science of using ultra-cold temperature to preserve human life with the intent of restoring good health when technology becomes available to do so. Alcor is a non-profit organization located in Scottsdale, Arizona, founded in 1972.

What Cryonics Is

Cryonics is a speculative life support technology that seeks to preserve human life in a state that will be viable and treatable by future medicine. It is expected that future medicine will include mature nanotechnology, and the ability to heal at the cellular and molecular levels.


You can get a pretty good look at the precedure in the picture section of Alcor's website. And most people only have their head frozen.

Here's a picture of where you'll spend your time in stasis.

www.alcor.org...




posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 07:14 AM
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i wouldnt consider even trying this unless there were successful human revivals.
the thing is why waste the money on something that cant be proven. for all you know the way you get frozen is the wrong way and by the time anyone figures it out your long gone and you wasted a load of money that you could have enjoyed while you were alive.



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 10:58 AM
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Maybe, they won't be able to take your body in life... but, with the DNA, they'll be able to rebuild your body...younger! And doing a backup of your memory, they can make a copy of "you"

But, will you be the realy "yourself"?



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 01:27 PM
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The difficulty with freezing people lies inside individual cells. Cells contain water and, as you are aware, water increases volume when it turns to ice. The cells go poppity-pop-pop, and all the king's men wouldn't be able to put you back together.
The experiment with the dogs, as I remember it because I don't feel like reasearch right now, was similiar to dialysis. Blood is taken out of the body, and replaced with chemicals that dry out and freeze your cells. Something like that.



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 06:30 PM
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No, the current problem with modern freezing methods is that the process causes ice crystals to form around the tissues in the body. These ice crystals cause severe damage to any cells that may have been frozen.



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 06:51 PM
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Simple answer NO

The reason Ice Crystals like stated before we are made of mainly water and when that freezes it turns into tiny ice crystals which act like tiny daggers which shred cell and cell walls up.

All these people that freeze themselves or their heads
hope that in the future we will be able to some how repair that horrible damage from the Ice (oh and in the case of the heads grow a new body). They could be right who knows I hate to say anything is impossible in 500 years who knows what we will be able to do. Some insects and frogs can somehow be frozen without ice crsytal damage and thawed out months later. I think they have like their own version of anti-freeze in their bodies or something.


People have been frozen I guess for short peroids of time when they fell into icy lakes and were able to be brought back to life. They have gone without oxygen for times like 45 minutes and were techincally dead.



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 07:28 PM
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Originally posted by Lillo

But, will you be the realy "yourself"?

NO!!!



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 07:42 PM
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I think that some animals have been frozen and brought back to life in some experiment; I seem to remember reading about this on ATS before, maybe try a search on cryogenics or something similar. I don't think it's ever happened with people, except for very brief time periods like ShadowXIX mentioned. A friend of mine from junior high school had an older brother who fell into a lake in winter and was stuck there for about an hour before being rescued, and he ended up recovering, but I don't think that's the kind of thing you were asking about.



posted on Jan, 19 2006 @ 09:25 PM
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People are entitled to spend their money as they wish, but let's think about this for a moment. First, you have to declared dead, then you have to be frozen and that's the easy part. The people who do this are banking on some very low probabilities, the first of which is that there will never be anything that goes wrong with the refrigeration system that supposed to keep you frozen until all the necessary technology comes to fruition.

Of course the technology is nothing to sneeze at, but let's just take for granted that someday nanotechnology will be such that the cellular damage can be repaired and that whatever killed you can be cured, the greatest hurdle of all is to raise someone from the dead, which is something that no one has ever done with conclusive proof. We throw the term clinically dead around a lot, but dead is when you don't come back and forestalling decomposition doesn't do a thing to solve that problem.

Even this explanation does little to convince. This procedure is as fraudulent as sex reassignment surgery in my opinion, except that at least the frozen ones won't have to live with the consequences.



Dying is a process, not an event. The purpose of cryonics is to intercept and stop this dying process within the window of time that it may be reversible in the future. The first few minutes of clinical death are certainly reversible, even today. There are good reasons to believe that this window will extend further in the future. That is why cryonics is sometimes implemented even long after the heart stops. Cryonics is not a belief that the dead can be revived. Cryonics is a belief that no one is really dead until their mind is destroyed, and that low temperatures can prevent this destruction.

www.alcor.org



[edit on 2006/1/19 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Jan, 20 2006 @ 08:40 PM
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Grady is absolutely right in his post. However, even though "the people who do this are banking on some very low probabilities", as Grady put it, what have they got to lose? If you've got lots of money kicking around and no one you want to inherit it, why not freeze your body after you die? If it works, you'll be happy. If it doesn't, you won't care.



posted on Jan, 27 2006 @ 09:27 AM
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Sorry for digging this thread up, but I found a recent article that may be of interest



Doctors Claim Suspended Animation Success

LONDON: Researchers are testing potentially life-saving techniques for keeping humans in a state of suspended animation while surgeons repair their wounds.
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In tests, they reduced the body temperature of injured pigs from 37C to 10C before operating on them and then reviving them...A surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Hasan Alam, has tested the technique about 200 times on pigs, with a 90 per cent success rate.
...
First he anaesthetises the animal, then cuts a major vein and artery in its abdomen to simulate multiple gunshots to a person's chest and abdomen.As the pig rapidly loses about half its blood and enters a state of shock, Dr Alam drains its blood and stores it before pumping chilled organ preservation fluid into its system.

The animal's body temperature falls to about 10C until it is in a state of "profound hypothermia" and has no pulse and no electrical activity in its brain.But after the blood stored earlier is warmed and pumped back into the pig's body its heart starts beating again and it comes back to life.

Sydney Morning Herald

This technology has fairly vast life-saving implications, such as a gunshot wound where the patient would die if treated normally. It's not quite a complete freeze, a la 2001, but it is a step in that direction. For Pigs.

[edit on 27-1-2006 by TheGoodDoctorFunk]



posted on Jan, 28 2006 @ 03:55 AM
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They should teach the pig some tricks, or condition it in some way; then kill and resurrect it, and see if it remembers anything.. Then people would feel more comfertable with the technology. I think the best option for most cryogenics is to be cloned. Which brings up more questions about memory and soul and consciousness. Otherwise, pigs may inherit the Earth..



posted on Jan, 28 2006 @ 04:26 AM
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posted on Jan, 28 2006 @ 04:35 AM
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hi guys i just had a thought arctic fish have anti freeze in their blood right maybe we could take advantage of this for cryogentics?



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