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Nickname for the blindfold

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posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 01:30 AM
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Hello and Happy New Year to all,

I had heard that a nickname for the blindfold used in a Masonic initiation ceremony was the "hoodwink". If this is true then that's disgusting!

There is an archaic usage of "hoodwink" that means simply to blindfold but look at some of the other meanings.....

To take in by deceptive means; deceive.
Archaic. To blindfold.
Obsolete. To conceal.

To cause to accept what is false, especially by trickery or misrepresentation: beguile, betray, bluff, cozen, deceive, delude, double-cross, dupe, fool, humbug, mislead, take in, trick. Informal bamboozle, have. Slang four-flush. Idioms: lead astray, play false, pull the wool over someone's eyes, put something over on, take for a ride.

LawrenceRaymond




posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 05:17 AM
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Originally posted by LawrenceRaymond
If this is true then that's disgusting!


Would blindfold be better? that means not seeing at all!!

Anyways i found this maybe this will interest you.



Why do Masons want to hoodwink people?

This is a misunderstanding arising from the use of archaic language in Masonry when modern meanings are different from what they were a couple of centuries ago. (E.g., "let" used to mean "hinder"--which it still does in tennis, but for most usages, it means the exact opposite: to allow or permit.)

"Hoodwink" comes from two words, "hood" (meaning to cover, when used as a verb) and "wink" (an archaic term for the eye). Thus, "to hoodwink" means to cover the eyes, originally. At the time when this word was adopted by Freemasonry (the early 18th century or before), this was its primary meaning.

Since that time, it has come to be synonymous with the phrase "pull the wool over the eyes," which is to say "to deceive." The word, however, is just as often used as a noun in Masonry as a verb, and when used as a verb is accompanied by the action of using a blindfold (the modern term for a hoodwink), making its meaning clear at the time.

The word "hoodwink" has only one meaning in a Masonic context, and that is "blindfold." It is only anti-Masons who hope to deceive others (should I have said "hoodwink others?") who claim, dishonestly, that Masons use the term "hoodwink" with the meaning of "deception."

Source: web.mit.edu...

Besides you can watch the movie “From Hell” and see how the blindfold is used. Its use is purely ritualistic, not conspiratorial.


[edit on 1/1/06 by ConspiracyNut23]



posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 07:09 AM
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I just feel like they start you out with a mask with no holes in it because you haven't been in the craft long enough to wear one like they use in Eyes Wide shut with holes in it. I imagine it takes years to get that far advanced. I bet you don't get to wear a mask with holes in it until your past a 33rd degree Mason and most will never see it. I don't know a lot about it, just speculating.



posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 11:54 AM
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Appreciate the response! BTW Happy New Year!

Here's another thought. Masons claim they are not a religion. Then why do they have a messianic-type figure at the top, namely Hiram Abiff, and why do they speak of entrance into the "Celestial Lodge above" for good Masons? Now to me, that sounds VERY, VERY DODGY! Unfortunately, from all appearances, they play dodge-ball extremely well!


LawrenceRaymond



posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 12:24 PM
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Originally posted by Burnt Offering
I just feel like they start you out with a mask with no holes in it because you haven't been in the craft long enough to wear one like they use in Eyes Wide shut with holes in it. I imagine it takes years to get that far advanced. I bet you don't get to wear a mask with holes in it until your past a 33rd degree Mason and most will never see it. I don't know a lot about it, just speculating.


The rituals for the first 3 degrees (the blue lodge) are easily found on the internet. Eyes Wide Shut was not depicting anything Masonic. (But then I’m no 33 degree) However, you did specify you were speculating.


Originally posted by LawrenceRaymond
Here's another thought. Masons claim they are not a religion.


re•li•gion n.
1.a. Belief in and reverence for a supernatural power or powers regarded as creator and governor of the universe.
b. A personal or institutionalized system grounded in such belief and worship.
2. The life or condition of a person in a religious order.
3. A set of beliefs, values, and practices based on the teachings of a spiritual leader.
4. A cause, principle, or activity pursued with zeal or conscientious devotion.
(from dictionry.com)

I guess Freemasonry certainly fulfills #4... You might be interested in this this thread.


Originally posted by LawrenceRaymond
they play dodge-ball extremely well!


I hope you don't think I'm playing dodge-ball, I just don't think there's anything to this hoodwink thing.


[edit on 1/1/06 by ConspiracyNut23]



posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 04:17 PM
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Hey Brother,

No, I don't think you're playing dodgeball.
It's just what the word "hoodwink" has grown to mean in later years but since the roots of Masonry has old roots the archaic use of hoodwink (blindfold) is what we'll have to deal with.
Think about this contrast between Masonry and Christianity.

Christianity --- "What you hear whispered in the ear shout that from the housetops"

Freemasonry --- Secret handshakes, secret gestures, secret rituals, secret - secret - secret -secret - secret


LawrenceRaymond



posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 09:25 PM
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I didn't mean to deceive you, I am not a freemason. (Although feel free to call me brother, he he)

I'm just attempting to answer your questions because many of the masons on this board will see your questions as "bait" and will not answer.

I'm simply trying to avoid a flame war.

There is a contrast of course; one is charged with spreading the word of their savior, the other a secret society.

But seriously, I'm sure you've seen "From Hell", in one scene the arrogant surgeon is performing his Master Mason initiation, you can see the use of the hoodwink in there.



posted on Jan, 3 2006 @ 10:28 AM
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Originally posted by LawrenceRaymond


There is an archaic usage of "hoodwink" that means simply to blindfold but look at some of the other meanings.....

To take in by deceptive means; deceive.
Archaic. To blindfold.
Obsolete. To conceal.

To cause to accept what is false, especially by trickery or misrepresentation: beguile, betray, bluff, cozen, deceive, delude, double-cross, dupe, fool, humbug, mislead, take in, trick. Informal bamboozle, have. Slang four-flush. Idioms: lead astray, play false, pull the wool over someone's eyes, put something over on, take for a ride.



Actually, in my opinion, that's exactly what it was supposed to mean, symbolically speaking. Consider first that Masonic initiation is a result of the Enlightenment, and secondly, that the candidate is hoodwinked when he enters the Lodge. Again, symbolically speaking, it isn't the Lodge that hoodwinks him, he shows up that way. What the Lodge does, and what is a central ceremony in the rite of initiation, is removing the hoodwink.

Something to think about.



posted on Jan, 3 2006 @ 12:06 PM
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Originally posted by LawrenceRaymond
I had heard that a nickname for the blindfold used in a Masonic initiation ceremony was the "hoodwink". [...]To cause to accept what is false,

Do masons call it that or non-masons?


Here's another thought. Masons claim they are not a religion

Lets stick to one topic at a time. The stuff you mention is interesting and I am sure an ATS search would be fruitful.



posted on Jan, 3 2006 @ 01:00 PM
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The truth of the matter is that the word hoodwink is older than the current diffination. In the past it simply ment to cover the eyes so that one could not see. The use of the term to mean to deceive somone is younger than freemansory. Excuse us for using antique words.


[edit on 3-1-2006 by lost in the midwest]



posted on Jan, 3 2006 @ 01:05 PM
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Originally posted by Burnt Offering
I just feel like they start you out with a mask with no holes in it because you haven't been in the craft long enough to wear one like they use in Eyes Wide shut with holes in it. I imagine it takes years to get that far advanced. I bet you don't get to wear a mask with holes in it until your past a 33rd degree Mason and most will never see it. I don't know a lot about it, just speculating.


Sorry no mask with or without holes. The hoodwink looks like a fancy blindfold. In the US it is used in the begining of all three degrees, in England I belive it is used only in the frist. I am sure my more informed brothers might be able to confrim this.



posted on Jan, 5 2006 @ 07:02 AM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light

Originally posted by LawrenceRaymond




Actually, in my opinion, that's exactly what it was supposed to mean, symbolically speaking. Consider first that Masonic initiation is a result of the Enlightenment, and secondly, that the candidate is hoodwinked when he enters the Lodge. Again, symbolically speaking, it isn't the Lodge that hoodwinks him, he shows up that way. What the Lodge does, and what is a central ceremony in the rite of initiation, is removing the hoodwink.

Something to think about.



Yeah man that reminds me of the rituals I read on Ephesians 5:11 the Mason does enter in to the whole ordeal calling himself blind who now seeks Masonic Light, uh like your user name sir.



posted on Jan, 5 2006 @ 07:18 AM
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Originally posted by Burnt Offering

Yeah man that reminds me of the rituals I read on Ephesians 5:11 the Mason does enter in to the whole ordeal calling himself blind who now seeks Masonic Light, uh like your user name sir.


Exactly. The main point of the Enlightenment concerned the fact that, throughout the dark ages, man had been hoodwinked by the establishment, and, as a result, was in bondage to ignorance and superstition. The Candidate entering the Lodge room hoodwinked symbolizes this, and the removal of the physical hoodwink during initiation symbolizes the transition from the dark ages to the age of reason. Also, it seems to me the cable-tow has a similar symbolism, i.e., it represents bondage to the church and state, which the medieval political system was based upon.



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 07:41 AM
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Originally posted by lost in the midwest
Sorry no mask with or without holes. The hoodwink looks like a fancy blindfold. In the US it is used in the begining of all three degrees, in England I belive it is used only in the frist. I am sure my more informed brothers might be able to confrim this.

Correct.



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 07:45 AM
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What Degree was the surgeon in "From Hell" performing? (keep in mind it was meant to represent London, 1888)

Or is it completely off? (I don’t think this involves passwords or grip, so I think you can discuss this, I hope)



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 08:32 AM
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Originally posted by ConspiracyNut23
What Degree was the surgeon in "From Hell" performing? (keep in mind it was meant to represent London, 1888)

Or is it completely off? (I don’t think this involves passwords or grip, so I think you can discuss this, I hope)


Personally, I haven't seen it, so I have absolutely no idea.



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 09:04 AM
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Here is the relevent part of the script taken from : www.script-o-rama.com...



MASON: ...to the center of the lodge and force him to kneel for the benefit of prayer.

[Eerie choral music]

Vouchsafe Thy name, almighty Father of the universe to this, our present convention.

MASON: Who is this?

FERRAL: A poor candidate in a state of darkness.
He comes of his own free will, perfectly prepared humbly soliciting to be admitted into the mysteries and privileges.

MASON: In all cases of danger and distress,in whom do you put your trust?

FERRAL:In God.

…clip…

MASON: Recite the solemn oath.

FERRAL: Never to reveal our secrets under no less a penalty than
my throat be cut across my tongue be torn out by its root and that I be buried in sand a cable's length from shore."

… clip …

Let the brother receive the light.


then the hoodwink is removed.



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 11:06 AM
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Originally posted by ConspiracyNut23
What Degree was the surgeon in "From Hell" performing? (keep in mind it was meant to represent London, 1888)

Or is it completely off? (I don’t think this involves passwords or grip, so I think you can discuss this, I hope)

Actually the answer has already been given.


keep in mind it was meant to represent London, 1888



In the US it (the hoodwink) is used in the begining of all three degrees, in England I believe it is used only in the first.



then the hoodwink is removed.



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 11:18 AM
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Originally posted by Trinityman
Actually the answer has already been given.


Thanks Trinityman, so it's the Entered Apprentice degree.

I didn't know if the rituals had changed a lot since 1888. And I didn't know if the degree depicted in From Hell had any base in reality. I had always assumed it was the third degree.



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by ConspiracyNut23

I didn't know if the rituals had changed a lot since 1888. And I didn't know if the degree depicted in From Hell had any base in reality. I had always assumed it was the third degree.




It bears resemblance to the degree of Entered Apprentice.



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