It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

was there a planet between mars and jupiter

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 31 2005 @ 06:01 AM
link   
For several years know I asked my self this question was there a planet between the planet mars and jupiter?

currently is there a circular orbit of debrit / all kind of asteriods and planetiods ect. were did this come from was it always there because of the process of the forming of the forming of the planets around our sun or was there a planet until several 1000 years ago?
destroyd be cataclisme or a war?

remember there a stories on clay tablets which speak of a mayor war between " gods ' on and in flying crafts.

what was the name of the planet or was it the 10th planet and we are searching in the wrong place that it wasn't in an orbit far out after pluto's orbit but it was in an orbit between mars and jupiter.




posted on Dec, 31 2005 @ 06:26 AM
link   
I was watching "Fire in the sky" on the History Chanel, they were talking about asteroids.

Astronomers have been saying that a planet should have formed between Mars and Jupiter but because of Jupiter's massive gravity disrupted the process, which just left chunks of debris.

They also say there are only about 5% left in the asteroid belt because the other 95% has been flung out of orbit by Jupiter.

As far as the 10th planet are you talking about Nibriu?



posted on Dec, 31 2005 @ 07:48 AM
link   
There was an extra planet, not sure of its location, but close to mars, it was called Marduk, and was colonised with mars before life was colonised on earth.

It was destroyed as venus entered the solar system, pushing earth to 3rd place, but destroying marduk as it went passed.

Kind Regards
Merger



posted on Dec, 31 2005 @ 09:35 AM
link   
Gravitation forces made it impossible for a planet to form in the area between Jupiter and Mars. As has been said, there's actually very little rock left. People tend to think of the Asteroid Belt as in Star Wars, with rocks everywhere. In truth, space is big... and the distance between the asteroids is pretty large in fact. As has been said, probably only 5% of the original material is left.

The rest was scooped up or flung out by Jupiter.

Mind you, this only PREVENTS a planet from being formed. If one existed there, it would not be "destroyed by tidal forces".

As for planets Niburu and whatever... the only recounts of their existance is given in stories by a man that sold the story as a book - so which is more likely, that he actually visited it, or that he wanted some extra bling?



posted on Dec, 31 2005 @ 11:22 AM
link   
if you went into the asteroid belt the most you would run into would be micrometerites, and dust particles. IN fact, you would probly be hard pressed to find an asteroid with the unaided eye.

Reports say that the total mass of the catalogued asteroids of the asteroid belt is 1/30th of our moon. Which means it is more likely there was not enough mass in that region to form a planet. Not to metion Ceres takes into account over 1/3 of that total mass. Jupiter probly sucked most of that potetional mass away, and the rest were scattered in what we now call the asteroid belt.



posted on Dec, 31 2005 @ 01:20 PM
link   
I have read that if you plot all the planets' orbits distances from the sun, they mostly conform to a logical pattern. Except that the one that should be where the asteroid belt is, is missing. There are other deviations if I recall, but I read that some scientists feel that it is likely a planet was there. What happened to it is anyones guess, but the fallout must have been major, and could be the source of the damage Mars sustained. Much of the debris likely disappeared into the sun.



posted on Dec, 31 2005 @ 02:04 PM
link   
If you believe Sitchin’s translations of Sumerian texts, more than 4 billion years ago Nibiru, a rogue planet, entered our solar system, narrowly missing a large planet called Tiamat, which cracked due to gravitational stresses. In a subsequent pass by Nibiru, Tiamat (called Marduk by the Babylonians) was actually struck and then bombarded by Nibiru’s attendant moons. Various sized chunks of Tiamat remained in it’s original orbit, becoming the asteroid belt, while the other half of the planet was knocked into a new orbit closer to the sun and over time coalesced into the Earth. It was accompanied by one of Nibiru’s moons, which became our Moon. Supposedly comets are water along with dirt and debris from Tiamat that were flung into space from this collision, which then became balls of dirty ice with the widely varied orbits you would expect.

Apparently this is what Sitchin claims the Sumerians were told by the Nefilim/Anunnaki or “The Ones Who Came To Earth From Heaven”.

The above is a paraphrasing from the Jim Marrs book, Rule by Secrecy, page 380, 381, which is a very interesting read and discusses many topics. I recommend it but don’t claim that I believe it to all be true.

That aside, it is interesting to note that nowhere else do we see a planet that has a moon as large in comparison with it’s mother planet, as our Moon is to the Earth. The moons of every other planet we’ve seen are very small compared to its host. Even NASA entertains the theory that around 4+ billion years ago (4 billion years again) a Mars sized planet struck the Earth and blew a chuck of it into orbit which became our Moon.

Interesting topic, isn’t it?



posted on Dec, 31 2005 @ 02:15 PM
link   
I've seen a computer simulation of a moon sized object impacting earth, and once they got the angle right, it ended up coming back out and settling into orbit like the moon, so I feel that that is a reasonable theory. As for Sitchin, I don't know enough to comment. But Mars shows very serious damage, even looking like 3000 feet of its crust was torn off an entire hemisphere. That is the difference in average surface level of the two halves. Massive craters also exist there. I doubt we'll ever know, unless there is some record of it, but that is not likely in my view.



posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 04:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by BlackGuardXIII
What happened to it is anyones guess, but the fallout must have been major, and could be the source of the damage Mars sustained.


What "damage that Mars sustained?" You mean the large craters? Earth has them too, you know. Except the ones on this rock are mostly covered by vegetation and water.


Originally posted by Ambient Sound
That aside, it is interesting to note that nowhere else do we see a planet that has a moon as large in comparison with it’s mother planet, as our Moon is to the Earth.


Pluto and Charon. What about them?



posted on Jan, 1 2006 @ 09:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid

Originally posted by Ambient Sound
That aside, it is interesting to note that nowhere else do we see a planet that has a moon as large in comparison with it’s mother planet, as our Moon is to the Earth.


Pluto and Charon. What about them?


Hmmmm. Well I'm no subject matter expert or anything, but a quick Google search confirms that there seems to be some question about if Pluto should even be classified as an actual planet anymore. It has a highly eccentric orbit, is mostly rock and ice, rotates in an opposite direction than most of the other planets, and is considered by some to be just another Kupier Belt object, of which there seem to be recent discoveries of ones larger than Pluto itself. I found it intersting that Charon is considered to have been formed by something colliding with Pluto, much like some theories of how our Moon was formed.

So, I stand factually corrected if you want to get technical about it, but I'm not sure that Pluto and Charon have very much to do with the questions of the original poster, except to provide another example of how the theory of the Moon being a chunk of the Earth knocked loose by a collision with somethig else may be plausible, since this seems to be the only other example of this that we know of, but I think we've gotten a little off topic here, don't you?



posted on Jan, 2 2006 @ 10:35 AM
link   


Nibiru, a rogue planet, entered our solar system


How can a planet do that? I'm not doubting you, as I don't know a lot about the subject, just curious.



posted on Jan, 2 2006 @ 10:57 AM
link   

Originally posted by mashup



Nibiru, a rogue planet, entered our solar system


How can a planet do that? I'm not doubting you, as I don't know a lot about the subject, just curious.


Well, you have to understand that these are just translations of ancient sumerian myths of what they were supposedly told by their "Gods". I don't think anyone here is claiming that it positively happened that way as there is absolutely no proof at all that such a rogue planet exists. However, given that we don't know everything about the Universe, we can't technically rule out things like this. It's just another theory that can't be proven, but is fun to discuss.



posted on Jan, 3 2006 @ 01:21 AM
link   

Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid

Originally posted by BlackGuardXIII
What happened to it is anyones guess, but the fallout must have been major, and could be the source of the damage Mars sustained.
What "damage that Mars sustained?" You mean the large craters? Earth has them too, you know. Except the ones on this rock are mostly covered by vegetation and water.

On Mars, the crater Hellas is 5 kms. deep, and 2000 kms. in diameter.
Argyre is 3 kms. deep and 630 kms. in diameter.
There are others over 200 kms. across, and most (93%) are in the south.
Also, the difference in altitude of the surface between the north and south is unexplained. In the south, it is 2 kms. below datum, while the surface of the northern highlands are 1 km. above...
So, unless you know of some earth craters that compare to Hellas and Argyre, or anything here that is even close in size to the Martian ones, then I would stand by my previous post.



posted on Jan, 3 2006 @ 10:46 PM
link   
The asteroid belt is to the sun,
as the Rings are to Jupiter...
Here today, gone tomorrow....a lot of tomorrows..



posted on Jan, 3 2006 @ 10:58 PM
link   
Blackguard, if Mars is as geologically quiescent as most planetary geologists think it is, then there is not now and may never have been tectonic forces at work there. But here on Earth, in just the past billion years, we've probably lost most of the our surface by subduction; that would eliminate just about any crater (and mountain range, and even ocean) you'd care to think about.



posted on Jan, 3 2006 @ 11:17 PM
link   
I agree that earth may have absorbed and erased many big hits, and the moon is a big blocker which no doubt saved our butts. But if the type of damage Mars shows happened here, we might look more like Mars than earth now. The atmosphere could be destroyed, if half the crust was peeled off. And other than the moon's appearance on earth's scene, I haven't heard anyone suggest we once had a 2000 km. crater... though we may have.
I am just pondering, and am no expert. I can't even grasp such a statement as 'in just the last billion years'. You could add or take away a few zeroes either way and I'd never know. 10 million years leaves a lot of room for error, in my view, no matter how certain the dating seems.



posted on Jan, 4 2006 @ 01:33 AM
link   

Originally posted by BlackGuardXIII
So, unless you know of some earth craters that compare to Hellas and Argyre, or anything here that is even close in size to the Martian ones, then I would stand by my previous post.


The Shiva Crater is hypothesized to be located in the Indian Ocean. That one is possibly as large as 600 km in size.

Other craters we know to exist would be the Chesapeake Bay Crater (90 km), the Chicxulub Crater (170 km), Sudbury Crater (250 km), and, finally, the Vredefort Crater (300 km).

No, those are not as large as Hellas or Argyre, but OTS stated, any craters as large as those would have been destroyed due to the Earth's own geological activity.



posted on Jan, 4 2006 @ 05:40 AM
link   
thank you cmdrkeenkid
I had no idea that earth had such large craters. Still, the scale of the ones on Mars relative to the planets size, if they impacted in the same era, might have been too much for any life that Mars possibly had.
I do not know if the elevation variation from north to south is related, so I cannot say that it was the result of a bombardment or not.



posted on Jan, 6 2006 @ 04:57 PM
link   
In my previous post, I mentioned the rings of Jupiter..
While there are Jovian rings..they are nothing compared
The Rings of Saturn! which is what I really meant...LOL



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join