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Scottish rite vs york rite

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posted on Jul, 23 2005 @ 06:06 AM
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This might not be the place to ask.. But I figured I could possibly get an idea. I'm trying to pick either the scottish rite or the york rite. I plan on giving alot of my time towards 1 of the 2. I would just like some feed back. everyone at my lodge refuses or has some sort of cop out why they wont tell me either way




posted on Jul, 23 2005 @ 06:25 AM
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I would encourage you to research the symbolism of both extensions before making your decision. Bear in mind that my advice may not be what you're looking for, since I'm a non-mason.

That being said..

Do you prefer two-headed eagles, pyramids, crowns, and stars, or do you prefer crosses, pyramids, crowns, and stars?

The York rite is more invested in history I'd say, whereas the Scottish rite is more invested in Philosophy. The York rite appears to place a greater emphasis on Christianity as well, given its more direct association with the Knights of the Temple. That's the perception from the fringe anyway. Take it for what it's worth.



posted on Jul, 23 2005 @ 06:29 AM
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I have read a lot more on the Scottish rite. I suppose I need to read more on the York rite. Hard to find any good research to read that isn't filled with wild far-out crazy talk. Some of those books are written by people who think little green men will inhabit the earth



posted on Jul, 23 2005 @ 06:39 AM
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Instead of searching secondary and tertiary sources, search primary sources written by historians and theologians. The best accounts are not always the first accounts, but a good rule of thumb is to read the works sourced by contemporary scholars in the field, and then go back to the sources of the sources, if you can. Continue that process until you have a fairly good range of knowledge on the subject, from many view points.

I can't overemphasize the importance of diligence in the quest for knowledge.

Google is fine and all, but it's a far cry removed from hard research unless you follow the various sources to their roots.

Find a good metropolitan library with a large network of contacts, and pursue your question. The more seriously you take your decisions in life, for example the decision to pursue knowledge, the greater the payoff, generally speaking.



posted on Jul, 23 2005 @ 02:36 PM
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Judging by your username, I would have thought you were already in the Scottish Rite.

As for which path to take, I think only you can answer that. I have only taken the Scottish Rite degrees, but have petitioned for the Rotal Arch degrees next month. Both Rites have great things to offer, and masons have nothing but good things to say about both.

Also, if you join the York Rite, you still have three separate organizations that you could dedicate your time to: Chapter, Council, and the Templar Commandery. The Scottish Rite does not. Why don't you dedicate yourself to Craft masonry? That is by far the most important part of Freemasonry.

Or, why dont you simply join both rites, and THEN decide which you like more? One things for sure, the Scottish Rite is definitely more elaborate and more solidified, but probably does demand more time than the York Rite.

[edit on 23-7-2005 by sebatwerk]



posted on Jul, 23 2005 @ 03:18 PM
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I'm glad this came up, I've been wondering about this for a while. Is there a Mason here in both? I would like to know the difference, as much as can be given.



posted on Jul, 23 2005 @ 03:22 PM
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Senrak is in both the York Rite and Scottish Rite, and I believe Masonic Light is as well. Senrak is actually very accomplished in both the Scottish Rite (Knight Commander Court of Honor) and York Rite (honors similar to KCCH). He can definitely tell us more about the differences.

Both rite's are actually very different, and also very similar. They both continue and elaborate on the same legends and lessons taught in the first three degrees, but then they also add their own things to Freemasonry. The York Rite deals a lot more with King Solomon's temple and its destruction and rebuilding, while the Scottish Rite goes on to other, much broader, topics and also introduces new philosophies and cultures to Freemasonry. I think there is much to be gained from both rites, but I am also curious to hear this from someone who has a lot of experience in each.

Senrak, I summon thee to this thread...


[edit on 23-7-2005 by sebatwerk]



posted on Jul, 23 2005 @ 08:25 PM
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Does anyone know where you can find any of the obligations of the York Rite or Scottish Rite? That would be interesting to look at. One obligation must be to keep a lid on it. Every 32 degree Mason I ask about the Scottish Rite says," Oh I don't go there anymore, dues got to high.



posted on Jul, 24 2005 @ 08:43 PM
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sebatwerk, you would be correct in my user name. I have a family history in the scottish rite. I am also a big fan of Pike. It has been alot easier for me to find information on the scottish rite rather than the york rite. My Lodge is wanting me to stay with them. But a large part of me is wanting to see whats out there as well. Any additional information on the York rite would be awesome.

Thanks for your help



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 12:46 AM
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My understanding was that the York Rite was geared towards Christian Masons, and that one is required to take a Christian oath? Is that correct?



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 12:52 AM
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No, only the Knights Templar (Commandery degrees of the York Rite) require an oath to defend Christianity. In reality, any mason could join, but it is DESIGNED for Christian masons. The Royal Arch and Cryptic Council degrees of the York Rite are open to anyone.



posted on Jul, 25 2005 @ 02:36 AM
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I knew there were Masons here...
Didn't know if the Icons presented were faux or true.

That being said, Perhaps you (all) could clear up some of the apparent misconceptions about your group that have been presented on this board.

Remember that it is Ignorance that breeds hatred, Knowlege is the mother of enlightenment. (And if there is any place that should be enlightened it is here).

I was "Invited" to join about 10 years ago, Friend of a friend sorta thing (Both being members). I was not ready to join, however I have been concidering the idea. (although I do not profess to have the most essential eliment required that - in my book - is the time to dedicate to any club at the present time, nor am I incline to join an organisation out of idle curriosity about the group - something inherantly wrong with that approch).

My Grandfather was a Mason (32nd or 33rd - can't claim to know much more other than I recall seeing his red hat - seem to think he was involved with the shriners), as was his father before him - seems to be a bit of a family tradition - Only time I remember him dodging a question was when I asked him what the "G" ment.

Where as I was presented with a plausable answer, something about it felt contrived or rehersed.

Would I be out of line to inquire?
The second letter he gave me was "O" but was illusive regarding the lenght of the word as he gave two words of different lenghts.
However for some reason, I recently developed the notion that the second letter was in reality "N"



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 12:39 PM
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I would recommend that you complete York Rite first, and then go through Scottish Rite. You can do it either way, and I actually went into Scottish Rite first.

But, on reflecting, it's probably all more comprehensible to complete York first because it completes the Blue Lodge saga and prepares the Brother for the more abstract symbolism of Scottish Rite. Nevertheless, there's nothing wrong with taking Scottish first if that's what you'd rather do.



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 12:44 PM
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Originally posted by dancer

Remember that it is Ignorance that breeds hatred, Knowlege is the mother of enlightenment. (And if there is any place that should be enlightened it is here).


Amen to that.


My Grandfather was a Mason (32nd or 33rd - can't claim to know much more other than I recall seeing his red hat - seem to think he was involved with the shriners), as was his father before him - seems to be a bit of a family tradition - Only time I remember him dodging a question was when I asked him what the "G" ment.

Where as I was presented with a plausable answer, something about it felt contrived or rehersed.

Would I be out of line to inquire?
The second letter he gave me was "O" but was illusive regarding the lenght of the word as he gave two words of different lenghts.
However for some reason, I recently developed the notion that the second letter was in reality "N"


You would not be out of line to inquire. Interestingly, many Masons have no idea about what is secret and what is not, and some think ALL of it's secret. In reality, there is very little about Masonry that is really secret.

The Letter G stands for "Geometry", which the mathematical science upon which Architecture and Masonry were founded. In a few alternate versions of Masonic ritual, it is also said to represent "Gnosis", the Greek word for Wisdom.



[edit on 27-7-2005 by Masonic Light]



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by dancer
I knew there were Masons here...
Didn't know if the Icons presented were faux or true.


Many of us are real Freemasons. Some are not




I was "Invited" to join about 10 years ago, Friend of a friend sorta thing (Both being members).


A man is never INVITED to join Freemasonry. Masons are forbidden from inviting, recruiting or otherwise persuading someone to join. A man must, of his own free will and accord, ASK to be allowed into the fraternity.

So are you sure you were invited? Or was it a more indirect means of telling you that they would like it if you joined? Otherwise, I don't know if your friends are actually masons




I was not ready to join, however I have been concidering the idea. (although I do not profess to have the most essential eliment required that - in my book - is the time to dedicate to any club at the present time, nor am I incline to join an organisation out of idle curriosity about the group - something inherantly wrong with that approch).


That is very noble of you, and is the correct attitude to take regarding petitioning for the degrees of Freemasonry.



Only time I remember him dodging a question was when I asked him what the "G" ment.

Where as I was presented with a plausable answer, something about it felt contrived or rehersed.


I don't know why he would have dodged the question. But, like Masonic Light stated, many masons are confused as to what is actually supposed to be kept secret and what is not. Like ML said, the letter "G" stands for Geometry, and it also stands for God. Both explanations are given to a candidate during the second degree.



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 01:34 PM
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The York rite is a rite that contains the 3 degrees of the 'blue lodge', the mark degree which is a link to to the the Royal Arch. When you become a RA mason you are eligible to join the Christian orders of Freemasonry which are the Knights Templar and the Red Cross of Constantine. When you have joined the RA and the KT and have been installed as a Master of the blue lodge you are eligible to join the Knight Templar Priests.

The blue degrees and the RA are open to all Freemasons and cover the history of Solomons's temple and the RA deals with the return of the jews from Babylon to rebuild the second temple. The KT is about the Knight's Templar and the history of that order. The RCC is about the Roman Emperor and is a very interesting order. The KTP is another Christian order and all part of the York rite.

In Scotland there are both the Scottish rite and the York rite. All Freemasons join the lodge and some join the York Rite degrees and some the Scottish Rite. In Scotland the Scottish Rite is Christian.

Gerard



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 06:18 PM
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Many Thanks for being so open, and answering...

I was told that the "G" stood for "Good" and after a choke or two, "God" was mentioned. About 8 weeks ago I saw the "G" somewhere, and all of a sudden the word "Gnostic" hit me like a ton of bricks.

Regarding my recruitment - or approch;
My Boss and close friend at the time had recently joined, and one day a man (Mason) showed up and they talked a little bit before they were interupted. At that point I entered and talked to the fellow a little bit - small talk about the weather or something. Somehow, I don't recall how the subject changed - or who changed it. But the topic became the Masons
and some of their works - Eg. the Shriners. At a point later on he said:

"I think that you would make a fine Mason"
As you can imagine I took it to be that I was being approched figuring that I was mentioned as a potential canidate - would also partly explain why my boss was taking his time returning.

With a smile and a wink, I recited the old Marx brothers line -
"I would never join a club that would have someone like me as a member"
Again he said "I think that you would make a fine Mason"
I thanked him and told him if I did reconcider I would let them know.

[edit on 7/27/2005 by dancer]



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 07:57 PM
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That sounds more like it. Masons are discouraged from recruiting, but ARE encouraged to let a person know that they would make a good Freemason. The idea is that by giving the man the idea that he could be a mason, he will ultimately take it upon himself to ask to join (assuming that he wants to).



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 08:35 PM
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I think that to be a far better way of doing things than the shanghi recruiting method.

It insures that the prospect is sincere regarding the organisation, In turn they get a member that is likely to remain a member for a long time to come. - Better for everyone involved.



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 12:55 AM
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I've also heard G stands for "Generative Principle", is that not the case?

Seems to me that's one of the most illuminating interpretations.



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