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Scottish rite vs york rite

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posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 03:38 AM
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The G can mean anything to an individual mason, it all depends on how he interprets the symbol. BUT, the only two explanations given in Freemasonry's lessons are "Geometry" and "God". Dassit.




posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 08:38 AM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
I've also heard G stands for "Generative Principle", is that not the case?


It's official meaning in the York Rite is Geometry. The same holds true in the Scottish Rite, but the second definition of Gnosis is also added. (Previously I erroneously translated "Gnosis" as "Wisdom", when in fact it's literal translation is "Knowledge". This may seem like an unimportant distinction, but those versed in the Qabalah will perceive the importance in the fact that Gnosis as Knowledge refers to Da'ath, while Wisdom refers to Chockmah).

"Generative Principle" is not a term used in Masonry in connection with the Letter G, or anything else to my memory, but generation could be linked to Gnosis, and even Geometry, in a mystical sense. Furthermore, Dr. Paul Foster Case, in his book "The Masonic Letter G", postulated even another definition, viz., Gematria. Brother Case's book is recommended to those interested in the more esoteric aspects of the symbol of the Letter G.



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 09:47 AM
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what is the difference between Gnosis and Gnosticism?
I thought that gnosticism had some thing to do with "contact with god" or means/ways to contact god?



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 09:53 AM
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Originally posted by NeonHelmet
what is the difference between Gnosis and Gnosticism?
I thought that gnosticism had some thing to do with "contact with god" or means/ways to contact god?


"Gnosis" is only the Greek word which means "knowledge". "Gnosticism" usually refers to several groups of early Christians who incorporated non-Christian and/or non-Semitic elements into their religious beliefs and practices. Because different Gnostic groups had different beliefs, it is impossible to generalize them here in a single post, except to mention that the "orthodox" Christians considered them heretics for various reasons.



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 10:04 AM
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nice, that cleared it up! ML as always; its a plesure!



posted on Aug, 1 2005 @ 07:44 PM
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Try to find the home pages of different Masoic Lodges around the US. Some of them have just a little bit of information, and others have VOLUMES of information about the history, origin, etc etc of the Blue Lodge, the York Rite and the Scottish Rite.

I haven't joined, but I will say that the full name of the Scottish Rite is the Ancient and Accepted Rite of Freemasonry (I hope I got that right). Or maybe it's Ancient and Approved. No, I think it's Accepted.

Anyway, it's the granddaddy of Freemasonry. The Blue Lodge contains the Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master Mason degrees, and the Scottish Rite goes all the way up to 33. The York Rite has a dozen or so. You know that you can join both, right? Of course it takes a lot of devotion I hear.



posted on Aug, 1 2005 @ 10:13 PM
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Originally posted by trinitrotoluene
Try to find the home pages of different Masoic Lodges around the US. Some of them have just a little bit of information, and others have VOLUMES of information about the history, origin, etc etc of the Blue Lodge, the York Rite and the Scottish Rite.


Just depends on the web developer. My lodge doesnt even have a website (even though we have at least 5 software engineers who are very active), we just decided we didn't want or need one. It's still a GREAT lodge, though.



I haven't joined, but I will say that the full name of the Scottish Rite is the Ancient and Accepted Rite of Freemasonry (I hope I got that right). Or maybe it's Ancient and Approved. No, I think it's Accepted.


It's the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite.



Anyway, it's the granddaddy of Freemasonry.


The GrandDaddy, the most important component, of Freemasonry is the Blue Lodge. ALL masons join the Blue Lodge, not all, actually not even MOST, masons join the Scottish or York rites.



posted on Aug, 2 2005 @ 06:04 AM
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Here is an interesting quote form Necrosses favorite writings-





No Rose-Croix Knight should attempt to enter upon this series, unless he has fully made up his mind to calmly, throughly, and with the best of his intellect, study to fully comprehend its teachings and follow its revelations, deductions, and analogies to a complete issue, for otherwise he is treading upon dangerous ground.



posted on Aug, 3 2005 @ 01:28 AM
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I hope this information hasn't been posted yet.

I visited the freemsason lodge in my city today and got some pamphlets. There wasn't one about the Scottish Rite, but there was one about the York Rite.

The York Rite has 4 separate bodies within it: The Symbolic Lodge (where you do the first three degrees towards Master Mason), the Royal Arch Masons, the Cryptic Masons, and the Knights Templar.

The Royal Arch Masons have the Mark Master, Past Master, Most Excellent Master, and Royal Arch degrees. These contains the scenes and stories that complete the Master Mason story. The Past Master degree teaches the Mason about the duties of the Worshipful Master.

The Cryptic Masons have the Royal Master, Select Master, and Super Excellent Master degrees. Not much is said in the pamphlet. They seem to focus on learning symbology and focus on learning integrity and observe what happens when people don't live good lives. Too bad they don't have a "Most Excellent Master" degree. Then you could go around and say "Dude! Most Excellent! Party on!" Just kiddin.

The Knights Templar have the Illustrious Order of the Red Cross, Mediterranean Pass, Order of Malta, and Order of the Temple degrees. To quote, they say that "without a doubt, every Christian Mason should be a Knight Templar. It is founded upon those principles enunciated in the New Testament."

I asked the Worshipful Master about the Scottish Rite, and he says that it instructs Masons about the obligations of personal righteousness, and about different aspects of the world, such as government, leadership, and social interactions. It also teaches what happens when people do bad things in these aspects of life. Kind of vague, but I'm sure he couldn't say EVERYthing.

Hope this helps.



posted on Aug, 8 2008 @ 01:17 PM
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IF you are actually apart of a lodge you wouldn't say you want to become part of one.



posted on Aug, 11 2008 @ 01:49 PM
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I'll tell you why the rituals for the Scottish rite and York Rite are different for each rite,so that is why neither one will tell you which to travel...



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