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Does the Sun have a solid surface?

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posted on Jul, 4 2005 @ 08:40 AM
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My knowledge of the sun and star structure is limited, but like everyone else I was taught that it was basically a huge ball of hydrogen and helium gas held under enormous pressure.
Check out an interesting alternative theory:

www.thesurfaceofthesun.com...

Is this possible?




posted on Jul, 4 2005 @ 09:08 AM
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I dont think so in the suns case, we can look at it and see it "flowing".


That doesnt mean all stars have to be this way.



posted on Jul, 4 2005 @ 09:14 AM
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Read on; what this theory postulates is that you are veiwing the photosphere and not the "ferrite" surface.



posted on Jul, 4 2005 @ 09:25 AM
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SOHO has demonstrated that the the sun has a solid, electrically conductive, ferrite surface, just below the observable photosphere which rotates uniformly every 27.3 days. The uniformity of this movement is unlike anything we find in the photosphere. It's rigid. It moves UNIFORMLY from equator to pole. It is being dynamically reshaped and eroded by continual electrical arcing between magnetically polarized points along the surface.
From source


I do not think this could be true.


[edit on 4-7-2005 by SpittinCobra]



posted on Jul, 4 2005 @ 09:28 AM
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My question would be, after the fuel is almost gone and the star starts to change, How does the mass center Expand?

[edit on 4-7-2005 by SpittinCobra]



posted on Jul, 4 2005 @ 09:40 AM
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Originally posted by SpittinCobra

SOHO has demonstrated that the the sun has a solid, electrically conductive, ferrite surface, just below the observable photosphere which rotates uniformly every 27.3 days. The uniformity of this movement is unlike anything we find in the photosphere. It's rigid. It moves UNIFORMLY from equator to pole. It is being dynamically reshaped and eroded by continual electrical arcing between magnetically polarized points along the surface.
From source


I do think this could be true.


Neither do I. Also, even if it were, where is the SOHO evidence? I haven't heard anything from NASA or its corresponding universities working on SOHO. I haven't seen any pictures either. Another thing is why haven't any of the major scientific magazines (such as Nature, Scientific American, Sky and Telescope, Astronomy, or Discover just to name a few) picked up this story? Something like this would surely make the cover, or should have at least. What motive would NASA have for keeping this theory from the people? None at all...

That website is interesting though. Not on the validity of its claims, but at how good of a job it does at taking some half-assed idea and making it look credible.



posted on Jul, 4 2005 @ 09:50 AM
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I also do not beleive this.
Ferrite is a rigid and brittle.



Ferrite has a cubic crystalline structure with the chemical formula MO.Fe2O3 where Fe2O3 is iron oxide and MO refers to a combination of two or more divalent metal (i.e: zinc, nickel, manganese and copper) oxides. The addition of such metal oxides in various amounts allows the creation of many different materials whose properties can be tailored for a variety of uses.

What is Ferrite?




(2) In Materials Science, "ferrite" (alpha-iron) is iron, or a solid solution with iron as the main constituent, with a body centred cubic crystal structure. In pure iron, ferrite is stable below 910°C. Above this temperature the face-centered cubic form of iron, austenite (gamma-iron) is stable. Above 1390°C, up to the melting point at 1534°C, the body-centred cubic crystal structure is again the more stable form (delta-iron).
Wikipedia

The Photosphere of the Sun has a temperature of 6,000°C (11,000°F)
The internal temperature (15,000,000° C.
These temperatures are well above the melting point for Ferrite.
Sun
Nice theory though I do seem to recall an old science fiction novel from back in the fifties that said there were people living on the surface of the sun.



posted on Jul, 4 2005 @ 01:56 PM
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The physics of the assertion do seem odd, especially the proposition of fuel usage and the generally accepted concepts of how stars work, age and/or explode.
The site also does not explain the massive flow of particles (solar wind) that streams from the sun, or the fusion process that has been a proven model of solar behavior.




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