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Releasing Classified Information

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posted on Jun, 14 2005 @ 05:42 PM
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I may, or may not know some "Stuff" that a mere Area 51 worker such as myself shouldn't know, first names of Aliens, their favorite food, which building Elvis lives in, that kind of thing........

Sorry, bad attempt at humor. Obviously, releasing known confidential information, even material obtained through idle conversation with others could land you in trouble.

Have we had any instances, or any good advice other than "don't do it".




posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 01:39 PM
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Do you have a security clearance and did you sign a non-disclosure agreement?

As much as we'd all like you to spill your guts
, I wouldn't go against any of the wording on the non-disclosure agreement if you signed one.



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 01:50 PM
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Have we had any instances,


Yes, and in such instances, when the government says "remove it, or we shut you down", it's removed...obviously.



or any good advice other than "don't do it".


Just to review the penalties for possible charges such as treason, espionage, etc. They aren't pretty.



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 02:38 PM
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I used to work for the Feds. It works in reverse too.

There is a lot of routine correspondence, reports, etc produced by various gov agencies that are subject to FOIA requests. For many reasons the agencies do not want the info released, even though under FOIA they can be compelled to release it.

So.... nearly all feds also have one or more webmail accounts (hotmail, yahoo, etc) under pseudonyms. For various technical reasons it is difficult for agency IT people to archive messages that go through the webmail whereas regular agency email is all archived. Any sensitive info mailed to another employee is usually sent through the webmail rather than the regular inhouse email. Then if a FOIA request comes in there is no way to prove anything has been withheld. The agency can state truthfully that all information they have archived has been provided.

Other methods include just copying the info to a flash drive, taking it home and mailing it from a spouse's or friend's email account which are not subject to court ordered FOIA searches (employees have been compelled by the courts to provide the name of their regular home ISP provider for additional searching).

Or just copying to a CD and snail mailing.

There are many ways to hide info even from the most determined judge or investigator.



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 02:59 PM
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We've had only one request to my knowledge and that involved telephone numbers rather than chitchat.

I doubt they'd ask us to remove anything that wasn't verifiable.

Why draw attention to it ?



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 03:25 PM
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Some of the secret stuff, especially the investigations, are kind of funny.

25 years ago, we lived in a small suburban area of older houses and neighbors who would say 'hi' on the street but otherwise kept pretty much to themselves. After we'd been there a year, someone organized a block party and my wife and I decided to go to finally get around to meeting the other folks.

At the party, about five or six people from up and down the street greeted me with "you're the guy the FBI was checking out, right?"

I said yeah, I'd known the FBI was investigating me in conjunction with a job I was doing.

In all cases, those people said, "Oh, yeah, we said we'd known you and your wife and you were a realy great guy and a real American, blah, blah blah...."

These guys didn't even know me (!), but they told the FBI I was a true patriotic Captain America. I mean, I guess it must've worked, I did get the clearance; but I gotta wonder how many of those clearances are granted because the neighbors were just blowing in the FBI's ear?



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 03:25 PM
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Originally posted by dave_54
Any sensitive info mailed to another employee is usually sent through the webmail rather than the regular inhouse email.


Maybe I'm reading what you're saying wrong because the first thing they tell you is don't send any sensative material through web mail. That's a huge no no.



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 03:42 PM
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I haven't signed any US non-disclosure agreements, I did have to sign the Official Secrets Act in the UK a long time ago, but the stuff I "allegedly" know doesn't relate to the Brits.

People talk to people, and tell them things to clear their conscience (such as deliberately missing targets in Iraq), or confidential info (a former worker who knows what is going on at Dulce), or classified military secrets (F-15E capabilities).

I may, or may not have all 3, but could someone get burned by passing it on second hand.



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 07:25 PM
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The key to doing it here on ATS is to sound kind of whack, establish yourself as a loose cannon, and mix in enough disinfo that the casual observer won't be able to tell the real info from the bunk, but those in the know that you are trying to send a heads-up to will. Its kind of fun really, but it can be dangerous, and definitely isn't child's play.

But now I'm giving away my own methods. Or am I just talking trash?




[edit on 15-6-2005 by Icarus Rising]



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 10:12 PM
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From experience... DO NOT SAY A WORD.

First of all, if you never signed any agreements or contracts, i doubt you really know much unless it is second hand or just plain old stories.

Second of all, if you were able to gain sensative information and posted it here, you will bring only woe upon ATS and yourself. I only post info that is gained through public means because its the only way to stay safe.

As for who you should worry about, the FBI and CIA aren't that bad, but if you anger the NSA, DOD, DOE, FEMA, or a defense organization... they will act swiftly.

If you feel you MUST share for the safety of people, document it all and unload it annonimously on a news agency that cares. If you just want to share, write it down then burn the paper to get out the urge.



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 10:39 PM
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Any sensitive info mailed to another employee is usually sent through the webmail rather than the regular inhouse email.

First of all any idiot with a clearance knows that this a big NO NO...that's a violation that will strip someone of thier clearance immediately....and on the lighter side, they will be issued an OF-117...at the minimum.

If Classified Information is sent electronically it is sent via SIPR net (I dont know what it stands for). Anyways, the SIPRnet rides the NIPRnet which is kind of like the regular internet.....and an encoding box per say is on all ends that have access to classified material.

NEVER on unlass/notclass systems.

And BTW, one good way to tell if an email address is for classified material or not......it will end like this,
JoeBlow@state.sgov.gov (government)
or
JoeBlow@unitname.smil.mil (military) etc...etc...something along them lines.

Ofcourse mail cannot be sent to these unless the sender has the same type of address which can only happen if they have access to the SIPRnet.



Then if a FOIA request comes in there is no way to prove anything has been withheld. The agency can state truthfully that all information they have archived has been provided.

Classified material does not fall under the FOIA.....that's part of the reason why civilian lawyers in many court martials involving classified material must first obtain a clearance.

Im not a computer guy.....some fo the stuff I said may be wrong as far as the names and all the lingo stuff. anyways, classifeid material is never sent over unlcassified means.....unless someone wants to get fired.



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 11:19 PM
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Originally posted by ThatsJustWeird

Originally posted by dave_54
Any sensitive info mailed to another employee is usually sent through the webmail rather than the regular inhouse email.


Maybe I'm reading what you're saying wrong because the first thing they tell you is don't send any sensative material through web mail. That's a huge no no.


Information can be sensitive and not classified. The DOD is not the only agency with information, classified or otherwise. And a lot of non-classified information is still desired by the public but for various reasons agency personnel prefer it is not disclosed.

Information sequestering is done all the time regardless of laws and regulations to the contrary.



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 11:41 PM
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Information can be sensitive and not classified.

It's called SSBU (sensitive but unclassified)...it only applies overseas, not in CONUS.

things like SSN's, DOB's and personal info are considered SSBU overseas.



posted on Jun, 15 2005 @ 11:50 PM
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Originally posted by SportyMB



Information can be sensitive and not classified.

It's called SSBU (sensitive but unclassified)...it only applies overseas, not in CONUS.

things like SSN's, DOB's and personal info are considered SSBU overseas.


Maybe in DOD jargon. Obviously other departments use different terminology.



posted on Jun, 16 2005 @ 12:02 AM
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It's DoS lingo...Im not sure about the others



posted on Jun, 16 2005 @ 05:46 AM
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In the Rosewell incident, witnesses were told that if they told anything about it they and their families will be taken to the desert and never seen again. Untill recently (about 1991) they have spoken about these threats and what they have seen because the general's who gave these threats have died.



posted on Jun, 16 2005 @ 08:35 AM
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Originally posted by speight89
In the Rosewell incident, witnesses were told that if they told anything about it they and their families will be taken to the desert and never seen again. Untill recently (about 1991) they have spoken about these threats and what they have seen because the general's who gave these threats have died.


There are two counters to this, either

1) Once the information was out in the open and these Farmers etc had given testimony to the press and writers, they were safe anyway. What do you think the USAF are going to do, kill them or disappear them? What better proof could conspiracy theorists want than for that to happen ?

Scenario is: LOCAL Farmer O McDonald goes on record with the local paper and says that the USAF recovered a big pink flying saucer in 1947, it crashed on his ranch and he was warned by a high ranked officer and some men in black that if he ever told his story, he and his whole family would disappear.
Now what do you think is going to happen if indeed that did happen? If the USAF arrive that night and all of a sudden the next day his whole family have disappeared, it will be in news and papers and on t'internet, surely its better to leave him be whereby we all look at the farmer with a mixture of pity, curiosity and skepticism, and the story is relegated to message boards like this. Which one would you choose if you were a USAF general?

2) There was no Roswell Incident



posted on Jun, 16 2005 @ 09:23 AM
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Originally posted by SportyMB
[And BTW, one good way to tell if an email address is for classified material or not......it will end like this,
JoeBlow@state.sgov.gov (government)
or
JoeBlow@unitname.smil.mil (military) etc...etc...something along them lines.


Anways, I took what you said and googled it, and this is what i came up with
www.dsca.osd.mil...

I don't know if this is real or not. Tell me if you think it is.

[edit on 16-6-2005 by alias101]

[edit on 16-6-2005 by alias101]



posted on Jun, 16 2005 @ 11:12 AM
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I don't know if this is real or not. Tell me if you think it is.

I have no idea
probably not....it's doesnt have a classification header.

I was just saying that the "classified over webmail" statement that someone made is BS. Im not an expert on this trash at all, I don't
know what IS real/fact but sometimes common sense can say what's NOT real/fact.

Maybe someone else can better help ya there



posted on Jun, 16 2005 @ 04:39 PM
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Originally posted by SportyMB

I was just saying that the "classified over webmail" statement that someone made is BS.


No one said classified information is sent over webmail except you. Sensitive info is, but not classified.

There is a great deal of information that the public has a right to request and agencies are legally required to provide if requested, but for various reasons the agencies do not wish it released and have developed creative ways around FOIA -- including communication over webmail instead of regular agency email channels. That is not BS. I have done it myself on many occasions.



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