It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Solution for the Bermuda Triangle?

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 11 2005 @ 12:05 PM
link   
I dont know if someone else has thought of this (probably), but could there be possible ocean currents coming from each of the three triangles that could cause an imbalance in ships and possibly them turning over? its really a very simple idea. sorry if someone else has brought this up.




posted on Jun, 11 2005 @ 12:07 PM
link   
Or it could be methane gas, comming up from the sea floor.



posted on Jun, 11 2005 @ 12:09 PM
link   
OR maybe a giant crack on the ocean bed that could create a whirlpool of some sort that drags a ship underneath. this could go with the first solution.



posted on Jun, 11 2005 @ 12:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by bubble boy
OR maybe a giant crack on the ocean bed that could create a whirlpool of some sort that drags a ship underneath. this could go with the first solution.


But that doesn't explain the loss of aircraft.

From an oil industry standpoint, methane hydrate is known as a major problem because it plugs casing and pipelines. From a media standpoint, hydrates provide an almost inexhaustible supply of articles concerning greenhouse effects, landslides, global warming and mysterious events such as the loss of aircraft in the "Bermuda Triangle". From a scientific standpoint, they provide much scope for academic research projects.

Oceanic hydrates have been recovered in some of the thousands of ODP/Joides boreholes, from which a total of over 250 km of core have been taken. Unfortunately, hydrates dissociate when brought on deck, and few samples were preserved for further analysis. Most of the oceanic hydrates are reported to be of biogenic origin, except where they overlie petroleum reservoirs, as in the Caspian Sea and Gulf of Mexico. The hydrates in the cores are found mostly as dispersed grains or thin laminae. Massive pieces of hydrate, greater than 10cm thick, have been found only at three sites. Downhole logs are unreliable indicators of hydrates due to cave-ins, and in many instances the inferred presence of hydrates depends on indirect evidence, such as seismic reflectors (BSR) or chlorinity changes in pore waters.

Link

Sanc'.



posted on Jun, 11 2005 @ 12:25 PM
link   
When I was in junior high school, there was this girl who did a science project on the Bermuda Triangle, and she came up with a really interesting demo that might explain why so many ships are lost there.

She had this large see-thru plastic container about 18 inches high and maybe 6 inches in diameter. She filled it with water and put a model boat floating on the top. Then (and forgive the haziness of the details, as it was about 10 years ago) she had some rubber tube that came out of the bottom of the jar. (not sure how she kept water from coming out the tube anymore) When she put the tube to her mouth and blew in a tiny puff of air, the boat instantly sank to the bottom of the jar like a stone.

Her theory was that maybe gusts of air are coming out of the earth's crust, trapped in air pockets and released by tectonic movement or changes on the ocean floor (avalanches and such) and causing this process on a much larger scale. It was a pretty cool idea, and actually quite impressive for a 12-13 yr old now that I look back on it, but it didn't actually prove that is what's happening in the Triangle, of course.



posted on Jun, 11 2005 @ 02:00 PM
link   
There isn't any unusual loss of ships/aircraft in that area.

As all the skeptics keep pointing out, if there was, insurance would be horrendously high for boats in the area. It isn't. Not only that, but the SIZE of the "Bermuda Triangle" varies considerably, depending on who's writing about it... and always seems to expand to include the latest sinking or accident. That's like saying that the State of Texas is this shape here on the map plus whatever surrounding states and ocean you feel like adding at the time.

skepdic.com...

www.history.navy.mil...



posted on Jun, 11 2005 @ 02:18 PM
link   
i remember on tv they were showing stuff about the bermuda triangle a main thing they showed was how easy it was to sink a boat

its supposed to do with methene pockets opening up and boats being caught up in it
what it is that sinks the boat is thta methene rising craetes air bubbles thus reducing surface area
if the pocket was large enough and the boat was idle (anchored) and stayed in the centre the upward force and the lack of surface area would cancel each other out .
a ship would only sink if half of it was outside of the bubbles and half inside as the boat will be at an unnatural position stable one end sink the other



posted on Jun, 11 2005 @ 02:39 PM
link   
I agree with Byrd as I believe that this area is over hyped as a strange, dangerous place. The problem with areas such as this is that so many factors could come together rather quickly to sink a ship. A quick severe storm, high prolonged winds, shoals, etc. all could play a factor in causing a ship to go down very rapidly. Now, with that said, let me have a little fun here. I have always believed that this area, like several others around the planet, is susceptible to gravitational anomalies. For instance, if a plane would lose the assistance of some of its controls is it possible that it could go down? If you really want to go far out, maybe the planes don't crash at all and essentially leave the planet and head out into space. Obviously the last theory is way out there, but believe it, or not, it's rather tame compared to others I have heard.



posted on Jun, 11 2005 @ 03:07 PM
link   
The Alaskan Coast has like allot more ship and aircraft disappearances than the Bermuda triangle. Including two congressman that disappeared. But nobody brings that up

[edit on 11-6-2005 by Vegemite]



posted on Jun, 12 2005 @ 10:44 AM
link   
There is a lot of scientific backing for this theory, and it is VERY likely.

-P

en.wikipedia.org...


Originally posted by SpittinCobra
Or it could be methane gas, comming up from the sea floor.



posted on Jun, 12 2005 @ 12:10 PM
link   
Some people have been mentioning magnetic fields anormalities around there...

Anyone with more?

To be honest, I'm just too lazy too look for that as it is likely nothing interesting. As Byrd said, the ships' insurance over there is about the same as anywhere else, so?

On the other hand a magnetic field failure or disorder there could account for ships getting lost, that is seaships as well as airships...

Whatever... I'm not sailing, and I'm not flying (oh well, sometimes, but not just there
) so... Pure curiosity...



posted on Sep, 10 2008 @ 02:06 AM
link   




top topics



 
0

log in

join