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Cold Fusion - A New Method That Works!

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posted on Jun, 7 2005 @ 04:21 PM
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Everyone remembers the debacle of the last time cold fusion was announced. Now scientists have come up with another way that does work - and at around room temperature, too!

Cold Fusion article

Excerpt:

A very reputable, very careful group of scientists at the University of Los Angeles (Brian Naranjo, Jim Gimzewski, Seth Putterman) has initiated a fusion reaction using a laboratory device that's not much bigger than a breadbox, and works at roughly room temperature. This time, it looks like the real thing.




posted on Jun, 7 2005 @ 04:32 PM
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Don't get too excited. Its not useful for generating power.


The researchers say that this method of producing nuclear fusion won't be useful for normal power generation...

college.ucla.edu...

Link to Article in Nature



posted on Jun, 7 2005 @ 08:16 PM
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Cold Fusion - A New Method That Works!


As opposed to the old method that works?


I disagree Quest. It may not be useful, but it's worth getting excited over. It's not been done before, and the first step to doing something efficient and well is doing it poorly. They're definitely on the right track not only when it comes to theory but also direction. It's good to work on this sort of thing.

Especially if you do it.



posted on Jun, 7 2005 @ 10:09 PM
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It is good to see that there is a possible way for cold fusion.

Now they can work on the power output of the device and hopefully in the next decade or so they will be effecient enough to run alot different kinds of things!

I say way to go scientists!

Scientists: 1
Other Scientists: 0

[edit on 6/7/2005 by hatchedcross]



posted on Jun, 7 2005 @ 10:11 PM
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Originally posted by Amorymeltzer
I disagree Quest. It may not be useful, but it's worth getting excited over. It's not been done before, and the first step to doing something efficient and well is doing it poorly. They're definitely on the right track not only when it comes to theory but also direction. It's good to work on this sort of thing.

Especially if you do it.


OK, its is worth getting excited over because it will be a great way to generate neutron beams.

However, the process is not self sustaining. The method they use doesn't lend itself to being self sustained because it requires high speed deuteron ions which the reaction itself doesn't create... and even if it did you would get an explosion not a burn that you could draw energy from.

It is a breakthrough, yes. Is it applicable to energy problems, no.



posted on Jun, 7 2005 @ 11:01 PM
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The entire concept of "cold fusion" sounds promising. I haven't seen many cases of the real thing though, so I am very skeptical about this.



posted on Jun, 7 2005 @ 11:03 PM
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Originally posted by Chimaera
The entire concept of "cold fusion" sounds promising. I haven't seen many cases of the real thing though, so I am very skeptical about this.


Naw, this is the real deal man. Mutliple reputable sources have confirmed it(and Mutliple teams have replicated this experiment), the catch is it's not usefull for generating electricity as of yet, maybe never but it is usefull as a Neutron source.



posted on Jun, 8 2005 @ 09:46 AM
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ok i highly doubt this is "cold" fusion. cold fusion takes place at 0 k, which is absolute zero. and neutrons can be used to produce electriucity, so it could prove useful.



posted on Jun, 8 2005 @ 04:45 PM
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Originally posted by lonemaverick
ok i highly doubt this is "cold" fusion. cold fusion takes place at 0 k, which is absolute zero. and neutrons can be used to produce electriucity, so it could prove useful.
No, cold fusion is fusion that occurs at a temperate well below that of a thermonuclear reaction (which happens at several million degrees K). It's commonly used to describe fusion that would occur at "room temperate" and standard atmospheric pressures.



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