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Car-sized asteroid just made the closest fly-by of Earth on record

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posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: Phage




A small comet would serve quite well.
Them suckers are fast and pack a wallop.


These being your words gave me a chill. Not use to Phage talking
like that.




posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP



besides that expected effect, shouldn't we notice another effect, from that supposed effect gravity has on magnetism?


Hard to say for sure. Maybe this "other" effect of the moon you are looking for has been seen or maybe missed or even hidden (by nature or man). Not too big a sticking point to me.

So you do not think gravity has an effect on magnetic fields? I believe gravity can effect the magnetic field and vice versa.



Short-term changes in the Earth’s magnetic field that occur over periods of just years or decades have now been shown in new research to have a very close relationship with changes in gravity. The research focused on a specific area, stretching from the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean. In this area, changes in the magnetic field correlate very closely with variations in gravity. The researchers concluded that this means that processes occurring in the outer core have an influence on gravity.


The findings of this research upends many existing conceptual models, contradicting assumptions made by them. As an example, it has long been assumed that density differences in the molten iron of the Earth’s core were too limited to create “a measurable signal in Earth’s gravitational field.” This research has resulted in the need for new approaches to the study of the Earth’s core hydrodynamics.
Magnetic Field And Gravity Intimately Linked


edit on 21-8-2020 by LookingAtMars because: add quote



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 12:14 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

theskylive.com...


edit on 8/21/20 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 12:28 PM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars
So you do not think gravity has an effect on magnetic fields?

No, if we are talking about gravity from an external body affecting the magnetic field of another body.

If we are talking about internal changes that result in local changes in gravity and in the magnetic field, then yes.



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

Looking a little crowded around here lately. Here are two older threads of mine. It looks like NASA agrees.

Earth impact events triple in number per NASA figures

NASA head - Expect a major asteroid strike in your lifetime



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP

originally posted by: LookingAtMars
So you do not think gravity has an effect on magnetic fields?

No, if we are talking about gravity from an external body affecting the magnetic field of another body.

If we are talking about internal changes that result in local changes in gravity and in the magnetic field, then yes.


You could be right. I just think in a system like this, pretty much everything effects everything in some way. Kinda like the butterfly effect.



posted on Aug, 21 2020 @ 01:32 PM
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a reply to: Phage




It would have been a low paying but really cool job. I could have launched after work and flown home. All downhill from 10,000 feet.


What a fantastic environment you must live in there.
Incredible mountains to sail in and all of the astronomy around there.

Half a mind to think of retiring there. I loved it when I visited 15 years ago. Will never forget how beautiful it was every place we visited. I liked Maui and Honolulu the best.

Do the observatories have days where you can visit?



posted on Aug, 23 2020 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Here is another flying rock making a run at our planet



Scientists recently spotted an asteroid on a direct collision course to Earth — projected to hit a day before the presidential elections in November.

The flying space object, known as 2018VP1, is expected on Nov. 2, according to the Center for Near Objects Studies at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

The asteroid is 6.5 feet in diameter, according to NASA data, and first identified at the Palomar Observatory in California two years ago.

The space agency says there could be three potential impacts “based on 21 observations spanning 12.968 days, with the chance of a direct impact less than 1%.



2018VP1 , 6.5 feet ie 2 meters

Unlikely to survive far into the atmosphere if actually hits



posted on Aug, 23 2020 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: firerescue



Looks like NASA may be expecting an impact. Just not a deep one.

Should be some good fireworks if it burns up in the atmosphere.



NASA says there are three potential impacts, but "based on 21 observations spanning 12.968 days," the agency has determined the asteroid probably -- phew! -- won't have a deep impact, let alone bring Armageddon.

The chance of it hitting us is just 0.41%, data show.

CNN has reached out to NASA for any additional or updated information but has not heard back.

Asteroid headed toward Earth right before Election Day, NASA says


edit on 23-8-2020 by LookingAtMars because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2020 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars




Looks like NASA may be expecting an impact.

Looks like they don't expect an impact, actually.

The chance of it hitting us is just 0.41%, data show.


That's 1 chance in 2,450.



posted on Aug, 23 2020 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Yea, I read that. In fact I posted it.

I just don't trust NASA to tell us the truth.

It also say's "there are three potential impacts", so their a## is covered if it hits.



posted on Aug, 23 2020 @ 03:48 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars


I just don't trust NASA to tell us the truth.
Why would they say anything at all? Why lie?



It also say's "there are three potential impacts", so their a## is covered if it hits.
But NASA doesn't say that. What NASA actually says is that there will be two more close approaches after this November.

Those will happen in 2025 and both of have a much lower chance of impact than this year's. Interesting though, two close approaches on the same day.
SENTRY

edit on 8/23/2020 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2020 @ 04:17 PM
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a reply to: Phage



Why would they say anything at all? Why lie?


Because at some point people will see it with telescopes. So they can't just ignore it.




But NASA doesn't say that. What NASA actually says is that there will be two more close approaches after this November.


That is not clear in the story, but makes more sense. Thanks for pointing that out.



edit on 23-8-2020 by LookingAtMars because: (no reason given)




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