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Starlink 5 mission shows object fly by rocket upon entry into atmosphere.

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posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 06:12 PM
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Came across this today and at about the 5 second mark something flies by really fast then, at about the 10 second mark you can see what looks like a small capsule fly by significantly closer. You can pause the video and try to determine what it might be.
Anybody have an explanation/thoughts?

SpaceX rocket fails to land after Starlink 5 mission launch

videos.space.com...




posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: skybandit

nice!

for sure you see something



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 06:24 PM
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If that was space junk, that was a CLOSE call!



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 06:25 PM
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a reply to: skybandit

One theory is debris from the rocket. Something obviously broke on the way up. It may have been what caused it to fail on reentry.



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 06:29 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Makes sense, it becomes dislodged in the early stages of reentry.

It certainly appears to originate from the rocket.



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 07:04 PM
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@ 1.12 something comes loose.


Also moves strange in a vacuum?



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 07:34 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Thats the most sound explanation at least.

I got a good laugh at my wife.
I showed her and she said that It looks like a rock.

I looked at her and said I guess it's possible that's it's An ancient piece of earth rock floating Around up there.
Then sHe says, can't a piece of rock just break off the earth?
I yelled at her what are you a flat earther!?

She laughed and I said no, rocks don't generally break off the earth and float around in space.
Unless it was from something big hitting the earth and sending a chunk of it up into the atmosphere and if that was the case, we would had heard about that one for sure. Lol



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 07:35 PM
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a reply to: Fisherr

It's not in a vacuum. The rocket is beginning reentry.



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 07:51 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Wasn't sure how far out/in it was.
Thought it was over 100km



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: Macenroe82

Ha! I finally found someone to top my other half. We were in Atlanta a few years ago, and a couple cattle trailers went by us. I said, "Weird. Bull haulers in Atlanta." Without missing a beat, or realizing what she was saying, she says, "Yeah, there's a Tyson chicken plant around here somewhere."

To this day if she's awake and a bull hauler goes by I tell her, "Look! A chicken truck!"



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 08:17 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: skybandit

One theory is debris from the rocket. Something obviously broke on the way up. It may have been what caused it to fail on reentry.


The camera in which the object appears is the one that's pointed more or less toward the tail of the rocket. The rocket is reentering the atmosphere tail first. The object passes by the booster from tail to nose. That means the object is something that was on the same trajectory as the main body of the booster stage but has a lower ballistic coefficient, so the difference in drag is causing the rocket to catch up to and pass the object. It would be almost impossible for an object on the same trajectory as the rocket to NOT come from the rocket. Because the object has a lower ballistic coefficient, that means it is less dense than the rocket--probably not a metallic object. I'm guessing maybe insulation.



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 08:17 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Hahaha



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I still can't get over her comment on "doesn't a chunk ever just break off?"

Same thing too, she didn't miss a beat, straight faced and was serious.
Like it was just a normal, everyday thing.
"Oh I was walking the dog and watched a meter hunk of the earth break off and float into space."
LOL too funny.



posted on Mar, 20 2020 @ 08:51 PM
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Couldn't spot the thing around 5-second mark.
Maybe it goes by too quickly for me.

Definitely can see the 10-second-mark thing!

Seems like rocket passing something on the way down (rather than something coming up at the rocket)?



posted on Mar, 21 2020 @ 04:37 PM
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Apparently, something extremely similar happened during the Es’hail-2 Mission on November 15th, 2018.

Object comes in around the 21:01 timestamp.

Preview...


Could be a regular occurrence and something from the craft itself.



posted on Mar, 21 2020 @ 07:23 PM
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originally posted by: fromtheskydown


Could be a regular occurrence and something from the craft itself.


The videos are discussed over at www.nasaspaceflight.com and people notice and remark on ice coming off the engine plumbing on practically every launch. Go back over the discussion threads on this and previous launches to see as many examples as you need to finally convince you it's friggin' NORMAL.

forum.nasaspaceflight.com...
edit on 21-3-2020 by JimOberg because: add link



posted on Mar, 21 2020 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: JimOberg

I don't think anyone in this thread is saying it isn't. But not all of us watch every launch, so we're simply questioning what it was and if it was something unusual related to the rocket problems this one had. Obviously something went wrong as it came back down. The question was simply was this related to that, or not.



posted on Mar, 22 2020 @ 07:54 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: JimOberg

I don't think anyone in this thread is saying it isn't. But not all of us watch every launch, so we're simply questioning what it was and if it was something unusual related to the rocket problems this one had. Obviously something went wrong as it came back down. The question was simply was this related to that, or not.


Fair enough....



posted on Mar, 22 2020 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: JimOberg

originally posted by: fromtheskydown


Could be a regular occurrence and something from the craft itself.


The videos are discussed over at www.nasaspaceflight.com and people notice and remark on ice coming off the engine plumbing on practically every launch. Go back over the discussion threads on this and previous launches to see as many examples as you need to finally convince you it's friggin' NORMAL.

forum.nasaspaceflight.com...

Jim, I don't understand your reaction, what part of my post did you not understand?
I don't need convincing.
I'm saying it's not unusual, it's happened before.
In other words, nothing to see here.




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