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Scientist Behind The Navy's "UFO Patents" Has Now Filed One For A Compact Fusion Reactor

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posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 03:11 PM
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So the USN's Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, or more notably Salvatore Cezar Pais, has filed yet another patent, this time for a Fusion reactor.

This comes on the heels of a tidal wave of advanced technology patents has surged out from the center and all seem to be being generated by Salvatore Cezar Pais. Including:

High frequency gravitational wave generator
Piezoelectricity-induced Room Temperature Superconductor
Craft using an inertial mass reduction device

All of this is revolutionary, but if they really have a compact fusion reactor, this would be a Holy Grail of energy production. All the benifts of nuclear power with way way fewer downsides. I spoke with a friend who is a patent attorney and they told me that the US patent office would not just issue them unless there was plenty of background to support it.

www.thedrive.com...

Pais did his PHd dissertation on "Bubble Generation in a Continuous Liquid Flow under Reduced Gravity Conditions" and graduated from Case Western university




posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Curious that the Navy is working fusion and the Air Force anti matter.

I wonder if there's a particular reason.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: grey580

If we could only tap into the dark energy source powering the expansion of the Universe.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 03:41 PM
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originally posted by: grey580
a reply to: FredT

Curious that the Navy is working fusion and the Air Force anti matter.

I wonder if there's a particular reason.


Funding priorities? It makes sense that the Navy would look at compact fusion to power the next generation of ships. Given we are looking at directed energy weapons and the like, you stick a couple of these reactors and you can have a fuel independent ship with huge capacity to generate electricity etc and you can start thinking about sticking the reactors into smaller hullforms like a Burke Class can etc.

The Air Force, perhaps as its looking to space and antimatter may be the way forward from a propulsion standpoint as opposed to projects like Orion........



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 03:42 PM
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We can't even do a big fusion reactor and they have one that is compact? Amazing! Imagine the tech they are holding back.

Very exciting news!



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Water, air... In the end that will not make a difference.

Unless water is your fuel.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: FredT

Regarding the Navy;



The Navy remains unwilling to discuss them. At the same time, nearly every physicist we have talked to thinks all of these patents are beyond the realm of known physics and are almost laughable in terms of viability.


I suspect that the last few words may well be the closest to the truth, however we are talking about the US MIC, and there are sooooo many other possibilities.



is the Navy building some sort of incredible craft based on science that remains foreign to the larger scientific community? Did they already do this years ago and are just slowly lifting the veil now? Are they clumsily trying to emulate what their pilots are seeing in the field, but can not yet fully explain? Could these patents just represent gross mismanagement of resources on the Navy's behalf? Or is this all some sort of elaborate disinformation play by the Navy—one that seems to have emerged right in step the rise of major peer-state competition from the likes of Russia and China, and the biggest expansion of advanced aerospace development programs in decades?


a reply to: watchandwait410



Amazing! Imagine the tech they are holding back.


If in fact they, the MIC, are holding any technology back that would improve the lives of the people paying the tax to cover the costs of these things, then they should be in jail.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 04:27 PM
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a reply to: myselfaswell

You never know as Arthur C Clark said:

"When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.

The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible.

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

edit on 10/9/19 by FredT because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 05:43 PM
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A little deeper research will reveal to you that the patent office did have a problem with it initially and, it appears, granted it rather reluctantly on some vague assertions by a General.

Having said that, I agree that "impossible" is often short-sighted.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 11:36 PM
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a reply to: FredT
Well its about time they upgraded. When even your jet fighters have a maximum air time of one or a few hours, boy are you in trouble.

But I would not get my hopes up to much.



posted on Oct, 9 2019 @ 11:38 PM
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originally posted by: galadofwarthethird
a reply to: FredT
Well its about time they upgraded. When even your jet fighters have a maximum air time of one or a few hours, boy are you in trouble.

But I would not get my hopes up to much.


No it will be along time before any of this really sees the light of day. But its a reason I am a supporter of defense spending. The reality is most of innovations come from war research. From the Internet to MRI scanners and lasers. If these are true we will eventually see them out in the civilian world. Imagine 100 percent of out power provided by clean fusion!



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 12:18 AM
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a reply to: FredT
War huh? What it is a good for?

Well apparently technological advancement, in every single case.


But I suppose there's got to be a better way then last times around to all that.

Or then again. There are to many weird people around just taking up space giving me problems. But then again? Ah.

Defense spending huh? I like those words. Either way, got to beat those few hours of air time in jets, at the least.

Does have a catchy tune though.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 02:04 AM
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a reply to: FredT

In the Foundation series fusion reactors are the size of walnuts.

But alas, no evidence need be provided that an invention will work in order to obtain a patent.

edit on 10/10/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 03:15 AM
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Why does the navy have to file patents anyway? Isn't that to protect the design/technical design of an object to hinder competitors?

What competitors does the US navy have, which might be impeded by a simple, civilian patent complaint? The Chinese navy?... Don't think so.

Is there an official documentation showing how many prior patents the navy has a hold on? And how that worked out?

Overall, I have doubts.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 03:55 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: [post=24681297]FredT[/

But alas, no evidence need be provided that an invention will work in order to obtain a patent.


Yeah those “fringe” researchers working out of their basements at the navy again.

Or it could be that the navy is coming out with what it really knows about advanced tech commonly known as UFO’s witnessed by so many people all over the world.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 04:30 AM
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originally posted by: grey580
a reply to: FredT

Curious that the Navy is working fusion and the Air Force anti matter.

I wonder if there's a particular reason.


Perhaps they're covering as many bases as possible?



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 04:41 AM
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Meanwhile back in the real world- the US Navy manages to maintain classified patents on things like how to make a stronger net.

All entirely legally within a well trodden Inventions Secrecy Act and subsequent legislation.

One of ATS's former SSP'ers talked us through the secrecy order classification process in several unnecessarily detailed posts.



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:16 AM
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a reply to: FredT

Cool!

What's next - a Flux Capacitor?



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 05:20 AM
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a reply to: Phage




In the Foundation series fusion reactors are the size of walnuts.


Another Asimov fan!

I just re-read pretty much everything he ever wrote - including his short stories which I think are top notch.

Next up on the re-reading hit parade - an Arthur C. Clarke binge...

"Going in..."



posted on Oct, 10 2019 @ 06:03 AM
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I received a couple of patents last night at our Company Awards Ceremony. The big thing to remember a patent doesn't have to be possible just could be built if enough time and money was thrown at it. It might be a different way of making a widget that nobody has thought of. Both of mine last night are not going into production but if they ever do the company owns the rights to it. I have a patent going into production next month. So you never know how realistic it is or if it's just a new way of doing something. Our company get 566 patents approved in 2018.




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