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(Manadatory) Secondary Cockpit Barriers and Germanwings Crash

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posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 11:19 AM
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18 years on from the 9/11 terror attacks and despite the passing of the Saracini Enhanced Aviation Safety Act last year, which sees secondary cockpit barriers fitted on new aircraft, many (including many pilots) are pushing for secondary cockpit barriers to be mandatory and universal across the board for all aircraft.

However, as seen in the Germanwings crash back in 2015, a drawback of this *could* mean that in the hypothetical event of either a commercial flight Captain or co-pilot going rogue and attempting to deliberately dive the plane for instance, the other colleague will be unable get back into the cockpit.

Prior to the Germanwings crash, suicide by commercial pilot (as opposed to a suicidal pilot in a small private aircraft for example) was largely unheard of.

Therefore, whilst there may be a push to make it mandatory across the board, perhaps legislators should factor in instances like Germanwings and have a failsafe *just in case*. I myself cannot say what this failsafe could be (remotely controlled cockpit locks for example?), but it's best to incorporate this into any future legislation regarding cockpit security.
edit on 2-10-2019 by TheRepublicOfCanada because: Saracini Enhanced Aviation Safety Act




posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: TheRepublicOfCanada

What if they simply designed the cockpit to include a lavatory?

Or even a sliding parcel space to send meals securely to the pilots?

These problems are totally solvable.



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: ColdWisdom

I believe the OP is talking about the risk of a pilot taking down the plane instead of a passenger (where the secured cockpit door is designed for)...

The only option I can think of is air marshals with a key or a remote controlled door which is unlocked by groundcontrol if a trusted person calls for it.

Peace
edit on 2-10-2019 by operation mindcrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 11:35 AM
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I posted this idea a few years ago. I guess it is time to post it again.

With modern technology it is possible to install a "panic button" in a airliner.
There could be multiple buttons through out the aircraft.
When a button is pressed the aircraft no longer responds to control inputs from the flight deck. The aircraft automatically starts circling and it's transponder code is changed to show an emergency. Ground control then takes command of the aircraft and lands it at the nearest airport.

End of problem.



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: operation mindcrime

I’m well aware of what the OP was referring to, and my post is a response to his concern.



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 11:41 AM
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originally posted by: JIMC5499
I posted this idea a few years ago. I guess it is time to post it again.

With modern technology it is possible to install a "panic button" in a airliner.
There could be multiple buttons through out the aircraft.
When a button is pressed the aircraft no longer responds to control inputs from the flight deck. The aircraft automatically starts circling and it's transponder code is changed to show an emergency. Ground control then takes command of the aircraft and lands it at the nearest airport.

End of problem.


So many problems with your suggestion that I wouldn’t know where to begin except by addressing the most compromising point to your post.

Designing an airplane with a remote override option leaves the aircraft vulnerable to hacking. If ground control can override the cockpit then in theory anyone could exploit the override and hijack a plane without ever having to set foot on the craft.

Epic fail



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 11:46 AM
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Just give all passengers parachutes. Problem solved!



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: ColdWisdom

I'm sorry...I didn't get that from your reply.

I thought the question was if a pilot goes rogue and the security door to the cockpit is locked, how can anybody prevent the pilot from carrying out his objective.

The lavatory in the cockpit would then be to prevent the co-pilot from leaving the cockpit?

Peace



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: operation mindcrime

Correct.



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: ColdWisdom

Gotcha...


Peace



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 12:15 PM
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a reply to: ColdWisdom

Funny military aircraft have been doing it for years and their systems haven't been compromised.



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 12:24 PM
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I've got a better idea, and it only costs about $0.05 cents per plane...



NOTICE
FLY AT YOUR OWN RISK
PILOT MIGHT BE CRAZY
CO-PILOT MIGHT BE CRAZY
PERSON NEXT TO YOU MIGHT BE CRAZY
YOU MIGHT BE CRAZY
YOU MIGHT MAKE IT
YOU MIGHT NOT

PRICE LIST
SEAT BELT - $25
OXYGEN MASK - $75
COLT 1911 - $1299
COMFORTABLE SEAT - PRICELESS
LEG ROOM - FOGEDDABODDIT!


edit on 10/2/2019 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 01:35 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

This is reading like a good idea. And you have a helicopter as your avatar so this is evidence you know stuff.


What do you think is the best button, like, keypad or just hidden button? Locks? They could have like 20 of these and then at each start the outer cabin crew can choose like 5 or how much they want.

But how do you keep others from overtaking planes then? With the remote control thing I mean.
edit on 2-10-2019 by Oleandra88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: Oleandra88

That's actually me hanging below the helicopter. Back when I was young and stupid.

The "panic button" needs to be something simple. Only flight crew should know their locations. As far as preventing someone else from taking control, I would look towards the Predators, the X-47 and like projects for their security.



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: TheRepublicOfCanada

I think some jet airplanes are already equipped for remote take over:

"As well as fully autonomous flight capability, the 767 and 757 are the ONLY COMMUTER PLANES MADE BY BOEING THAT CAN BE FLOWN VIA REMOTE CONTROL. It is a feature that is standard to all of them, all 757's and 767's can do it. The purpose for this is if there is a problem with the pilots, Norad can fly the planes to safe destinations via remote. Only in this flight mode can those craft exceed their software limits and perform to their actual physical limits because a pre existing emergency situation is assumed if this mode of flight is used."



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 02:14 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Your COLT 1911 comment made me think of this skit:




posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

Oh wow impressing, I take back the funny comment and say serious respect!

Eventually maybe people or terrorists might find out these locations but 20 of them. For three buttons out of 20, that gives 20³ and 8000 combinations.



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: Oleandra88

Depending on the size of the aircraft you shouldn't need more than four or five buttons. These should be just press once. In an emergency there may not be time to remember a combination. You could put them in a locked compartment that would pop open with a swipe card or RFID chip.



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 03:03 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499
Good idea with the compartments, they could still be ripped open if the swipe reading thing fails. Are the pilots screened for weapons, do you know?



posted on Oct, 2 2019 @ 03:25 PM
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Are you digginfotruf? Your posts remind me of his. a reply to: TheRepublicOfCanada



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