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Meteorite hits a rice field in India

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posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 11:19 PM
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originally posted by: MisterSpock

originally posted by: Allaroundyou
a reply to: MisterSpock

.....Well I was thinking maybe radioactive. But I like where your head is at. Far more creative than mine.



Everyone dies, might as well go out with a "happy ending"....

This theory extends to vampires too, they'd have a much easier time(the hot countess) if she'd do the "bite"/Kill AFTER the seduction.



Not sure it would be easier but it would definitely be more courteous




posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 11:20 PM
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Two more things to add.

That looks like a speaker magnet sticking to the meteorite not the other way around .

They don’t seem to be that rare.

The one that fell in Kenya weighs 65 kg and it’s on eBay as we speak for $45,000 .



posted on Jul, 26 2019 @ 11:44 PM
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originally posted by: IkNOwSTuff

originally posted by: MisterSpock

originally posted by: Allaroundyou
a reply to: MisterSpock

.....Well I was thinking maybe radioactive. But I like where your head is at. Far more creative than mine.



Everyone dies, might as well go out with a "happy ending"....

This theory extends to vampires too, they'd have a much easier time(the hot countess) if she'd do the "bite"/Kill AFTER the seduction.



Not sure it would be easier but it would definitely be more courteous


Exactly, think of the victim.

Most men would die happy after a nice release vs being "harvested" on the edge of satisfaction.

Just another hole in the whole scyfy/fantasy genre.



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 02:25 AM
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Coincides with the unexpected pass we just had.... a 100m wide asteroid flew past us at 70.000 km. Could be a friend of his?



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 04:56 AM
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Boulders that fall off a cliff don't leave a near-perfect circle on the ground, since boulders are not - afaik near-perfect spheroids.

But unlike boulders, 'meteorites' leave almost perfect circular impressions in the ground, like we see here!!


Much the same way meteorites have created near-perfectly round holes on the moon, which we call 'craters'.


What is odd about the craters, however, is that no meteorites, or debris, is left on the moon, around, or in, any of the craters, 'made' by the meteorites.

If a tiny meteorite is found in the near-perfect hole it created, why wouldn't the much larger meteorites be found on the moon, which is supposed to preserve things on it, unlike Earth?


The moon's craters were not created by any meteorites, obviously. No evidence of any sort, means no meteorites caused it.



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 05:35 AM
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I dunno, story seems kind of dubious to me.

A meteorite that large would have been much larger as it passed through the atmosphere and minimally it would have created a massive sonic boom (not just a "thud") and would have been accompanied sizeable fireball (neither of which are mentioned). The so called "crater" also doesn't look right, looks more like a hole someone dug in the ground. An object that large, traveling at potentially thousands of miles per hour, would have made a significant blast crater, and blast craters don't have vertical sides, they're usually more dish shaped.

I'm thinking this is a ruse. I think what really happened is, they were farming a rice field and encountered a rock. They dug the rock out (as farmers do) and determined it to have iron based properties (i.e. magnets would stick to it). Then they concocted the story about it being a meteorite.

It could really be a meteorite at the end of the day, but it could also just be a piece of hematite or magnetite (which is common in India). Freshly fallen meteorites are usually pretty jagged and pocked and blackened from the molten slag burning off as it passes through the atmosphere. This one isn't like that, it's fairly smooth and looks like it's been eroded in the ground for a while.



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 06:22 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I was thinking the same but when I enter the estimates into an impact calculator (ie. 13kg, 30cm diameter, 11.3 km/s velocity and a density of 8000 kg/m3)

I get this result:

 Diameter: 1.3 meters ( = 4.25 feet )Final Crater Depth: 27.6 cm ( = 10.9 inches )The crater formed is a simple crater
The floor of the crater is underlain by a lens of broken rock debris (breccia) with a maximum thickness of 12.8 cm ( = 5.03 inches ).At this impact velocity ( < 12 km/s), little shock melting of the target occurs.

At this impact velocity ( < 15 km/s), little vaporization occurs; no fireball is created, therefore, there is no thermal radiation damage


Dunno....

Peace



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 07:43 AM
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a reply to: operation mindcrime

But there would definitely be a shock wave and associated sonic boom.

Good math though.

ETA - Not sure I agree with the no fireball part though. There's going to be considerable atmospheric friction at 15km/sec.


edit on 7/27/2019 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 27 2019 @ 02:35 PM
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A baby meteorite.

Yet again, no extinction-level event...

Yawn. Earth is boring.



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