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Studying Freemasons

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posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:22 PM
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originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: FrictionalForces

no downside as far as I can see. Dues are cheap, $100 a year. When you join a side group, it almost always comes with a hat, so there is that.

You will meet the most amazing people, the kind you want to be friends with. I don't know what you have heard, but if you ask specific questions, most here can answer. We just can't tell you the handshakes and passwords, and if you ever plan to join, it's best if you don't know what the ritual entails. Not because it's bad, but because it's best to experience it with a sense of wonder and excitement.


I got that part about the handshakes and passwords being a secret. I guess the initiation ritual being a secret does makes sense due to the fact you want it to be exciting. I appreciate your feedback and look forward to speaking more about the history of the Freemasons.




posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:22 PM
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originally posted by: NoClue
Do I interpret that right. A lot of the Grandmaster and Master of the lodge leave because of "burnout" ?


I didn't say a lot, I said it could happen. I don't know of any recent Grand Masters that have demitted, they usually stick around and do stuff like act as an aide to a newer Grand Master or work with the charity fund. I know a couple of Masters who demitted a year or two after running the lodge, they didn't enjoy the personality management piece of it which I can attest is the least fun part of the job.



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Really?

Would imagine one could spam the title with "Key Master" or something, haha,



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:24 PM
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originally posted by: CriticalStinker

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: FrictionalForces
What are the perks of being a Freemason?


Almost none in the material sense with the possible exception being that Masons in New Jersey get to have beer after Lodge during their post-meeting dinner. Most states dont let you have adult beverages.


Wait, they get regulated even though it's a private club?

Either way, some rules are meant to be broken, and boy is that a dumb one.

Plus it would be an easy way to find out if there are any loose lips trying to sink ships. Rule #1, don't talk about the booze, lines, and hookers.


Booze, lines, and hookers you say? What if you are already in a committed relationship with someone? Is there a point in joining if you are in a committed relationship if that is all you have to look forward to?



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:26 PM
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originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: ADVISOR
a reply to: FrictionalForces

Go to your local Lodge and ask. They will let you in and answer every question they can.
So you guys are dialing back on the old 'tongue torn out by the root' thang? Pity.

oh no, we do that all the time. You can tell by how many bodies show up with those injuries. A Vulture gotta eat right?


I hope you guys aren't literally speaking about cutting out someones tongue?



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

One more if you do not mind, does a central grand library, or vault exist somewhere?

Just for important books and such.



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:30 PM
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originally posted by: solve
Really?


Yeah, it goes back to George Washington being asked to take that role and declining. Since then no on else has been asked and frankly there is no way to create that role without changing every state's constitution and by-laws which will never happen.



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:33 PM
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You all have some very interesting points and history on this. Are any of you actually a member of the fraternity? I didn't really get the chance to read each reply because I have a very busy life (fiance, school, work, family and friends). On top of that, finding the time to read about them and take some notes on what I have learned. From what I have read, I know somewhat about the ranks held and the position they play in the fraternity. What kind of group activities do you guys have other than the monthly dinner? I did contact my local lodge by email and I am still waiting to hear something back from someone.



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: FrictionalForces

as you come across questions, be sure to ask. There is a lot of mis information out there.
I will say, it's the best thing I have done besides marry my best friend. I have no regrets.
I would suggest going to a lodge and asking questions in person. If you find what night they meet, and what time they eat, you can ask to come to the meal. Most masons are tickled to share the craft with you, but they need to be asked first, so be sure to ask.



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:40 PM
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originally posted by: FrictionalForces

originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: ADVISOR
a reply to: FrictionalForces

Go to your local Lodge and ask. They will let you in and answer every question they can.
So you guys are dialing back on the old 'tongue torn out by the root' thang? Pity.

oh no, we do that all the time. You can tell by how many bodies show up with those injuries. A Vulture gotta eat right?


I hope you guys aren't literally speaking about cutting out someones tongue?


If you look into the penalties of the obligation, you see some wild things. The important part is to read the few words before. the penalties are symbolic, as most things in freemasonry are. My attempt at humor has to do with the fact that bodies mutilated according to the penalties aren't found, (we hide the # out of them) or more likely, that stuff doesn't happen. To put it simply, we don't kill folks. That's the rotary.



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:43 PM
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originally posted by: solve
One more if you do not mind, does a central grand library, or vault exist somewhere?

Just for important books and such.


Each Grand Lodge and many Lodges have their own libraries. The two best are probably at the House of the Temple in DC and in Lexington, MA where both of the Scottish Rite Jurisdiction HQs are respectively housed. They also have museums with a pretty good array of exhibits on all fraternal organizations.



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:45 PM
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originally posted by: FrictionalForces
You all have some very interesting points and history on this. Are any of you actually a member of the fraternity? I didn't really get the chance to read each reply because I have a very busy life (fiance, school, work, family and friends). On top of that, finding the time to read about them and take some notes on what I have learned. From what I have read, I know somewhat about the ranks held and the position they play in the fraternity. What kind of group activities do you guys have other than the monthly dinner? I did contact my local lodge by email and I am still waiting to hear something back from someone.


I am a past master of my lodge, a 32nd degree Scottish Rite mason, and a shriner. (although I am just a shriner in name, I have yet to get involved) I am active in the Scottish Rite on several degree teams and attend lodge about 6 times a year. I am no more a mason than any other 3rd degree master mason, the 32 thing only counts in the Scottish Rite, and everyone in the Scottish Rite is a 32nd. (US Southern Jurisdiction) Most masons here are close to the same credentials, which means even the drunk guy from Jersey isn't a "high ranking", although he has been high, and likely is ranky.



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 02:53 PM
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a reply to: The GUT

The Gut once called me "esoteric light", while we were in discussion about the spiritual/esoteric side of Freemasonry. At first I took offence, but soon realized he was totally correct. I had barely scratched the surface, and thought I knew something.

I learn so much from others, and have massive respect for those same people. As in life, you can find anything, but you have to look for it. (except those damn keys) Freemasonry only opens a window into what mysteries it holds, and you don't have to be a mason to find them. But you do have to go after them, they won't come to you. (none of this is directed at The Gut, as he likely is the one who told me all that) But he is worth listening to. He exemplifies the difference between knowledge and wisdom.



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 03:14 PM
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originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: The GUT

The Gut once called me "esoteric light", while we were in discussion about the spiritual/esoteric side of Freemasonry. At first I took offence, but soon realized he was totally correct. I had barely scratched the surface, and thought I knew something.

I learn so much from others, and have massive respect for those same people. As in life, you can find anything, but you have to look for it. (except those damn keys) Freemasonry only opens a window into what mysteries it holds, and you don't have to be a mason to find them. But you do have to go after them, they won't come to you. (none of this is directed at The Gut, as he likely is the one who told me all that) But he is worth listening to. He exemplifies the difference between knowledge and wisdom.


If I may add... knowledge is knowing something but wisdom is still knowing something, but still going after the answers you don't have to your current knowledge and understanding? This is just my opinion on the two.



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 03:24 PM
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originally posted by: FrictionalForces

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: The GUT

The Gut once called me "esoteric light", while we were in discussion about the spiritual/esoteric side of Freemasonry. At first I took offence, but soon realized he was totally correct. I had barely scratched the surface, and thought I knew something.

I learn so much from others, and have massive respect for those same people. As in life, you can find anything, but you have to look for it. (except those damn keys) Freemasonry only opens a window into what mysteries it holds, and you don't have to be a mason to find them. But you do have to go after them, they won't come to you. (none of this is directed at The Gut, as he likely is the one who told me all that) But he is worth listening to. He exemplifies the difference between knowledge and wisdom.


If I may add... knowledge is knowing something but wisdom is still knowing something, but still going after the answers you don't have to your current knowledge and understanding? This is just my opinion on the two.


Very nicely put, Forward is backward, Nihil Sub Sole Novum.



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 04:19 PM
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a reply to: network dude

You know I have much respect for you, 'dude, so the kind words mean a lot.

I've been thinking about General Pike this morning since this thread brought him to mind and the thought occurred to me--not for the first time--that his unique and unprecedented statue in D.C. isn't one that is likely to fall due to any silly revisionists.




In 1861, Pike penned the lyrics to "Dixie to Arms!"[14] At the beginning of the war, Pike was appointed as Confederate envoy to the Native Americans. In this capacity he negotiated several treaties, one of the most important being with Cherokee chief John Ross, which was concluded in 1861. At the time, Ross agreed to support the Confederacy, which promised the tribes a Native American state if it won the war. Ross later changed his mind and left Indian Territory, but the succeeding Cherokee government maintained the alliance.

In 1944, his remains were moved to the House of the Temple, headquarters of the Southern Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite. A memorial to Pike is located in the Judiciary Square neighborhood of Washington, D.C. He is the only Confederate military officer with an outdoor statue in Washington, D.C.[/ex]



Link
edit on 13-6-2019 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2019 @ 04:30 PM
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originally posted by: FrictionalForces

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: The GUT

The Gut once called me "esoteric light", while we were in discussion about the spiritual/esoteric side of Freemasonry. At first I took offence, but soon realized he was totally correct. I had barely scratched the surface, and thought I knew something.

I learn so much from others, and have massive respect for those same people. As in life, you can find anything, but you have to look for it. (except those damn keys) Freemasonry only opens a window into what mysteries it holds, and you don't have to be a mason to find them. But you do have to go after them, they won't come to you. (none of this is directed at The Gut, as he likely is the one who told me all that) But he is worth listening to. He exemplifies the difference between knowledge and wisdom.


If I may add... knowledge is knowing something but wisdom is still knowing something, but still going after the answers you don't have to your current knowledge and understanding? This is just my opinion on the two.


Keep in mind, information isn't knowledge and wisdom is the daughter of experience.



posted on Jun, 14 2019 @ 04:58 AM
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a reply to: FrictionalForces

I have come to believe that knowledge is knowing what to say, and wisdom is knowing when to say it. I'm sure it's deeper than that, but it's easy for me to grasp.



posted on Jun, 14 2019 @ 05:22 AM
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originally posted by: olaru12
a reply to: FrictionalForces




What does my future look like if I do become one? Will they forgive me of my sins once I confess? Any input is greatly appreciated.




I think wanna be Masons need to pass muster in the "Order of DeMolay".... my rich uncle pressured me to join when I was just a lad, but drugs, alcohol and fast women led me astray. So I joined a hedonistic sect of worthless artists instead. We also wore goofy hats from time to time and sang folk songs.


The Order of Demolay was established originally on 24th March 1919 in Kansas City, Missouri, however it was later changed to 18th March to coincide with De-Molay's death on 18th March 1314. Obviously i'm interested in 24th March 1919 at location.
A lot of secret societies align Sirius and Alnilam to day-markers and in this case midnight day marker was chosen while Sirius was setting in the West along the horizon, links below:-
demolay.org... President Bill Clinton was a member.
scjdemolay.org...
en.wikipedia.org...
Astronomy graph below showing Sirius setting


edit on 14-6-2019 by Astronomer62 because: Link fault



posted on Jun, 14 2019 @ 08:13 AM
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originally posted by: The GUT
a reply to: network dude

You know I have much respect for you, 'dude, so the kind words mean a lot.

I've been thinking about General Pike this morning since this thread brought him to mind and the thought occurred to me--not for the first time--that his unique and unprecedented statue in D.C. isn't one that is likely to fall due to any silly revisionists.




In 1861, Pike penned the lyrics to "Dixie to Arms!"[14] At the beginning of the war, Pike was appointed as Confederate envoy to the Native Americans. In this capacity he negotiated several treaties, one of the most important being with Cherokee chief John Ross, which was concluded in 1861. At the time, Ross agreed to support the Confederacy, which promised the tribes a Native American state if it won the war. Ross later changed his mind and left Indian Territory, but the succeeding Cherokee government maintained the alliance.

In 1944, his remains were moved to the House of the Temple, headquarters of the Southern Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite. A memorial to Pike is located in the Judiciary Square neighborhood of Washington, D.C. He is the only Confederate military officer with an outdoor statue in Washington, D.C.[/ex]



Link


Albert Pike is reported to have written that "Sirius is the Blazing Star in our lodges", which may be true for Southern Scottish Rite. We can see this by 2 dates of being when the construction started on 18th October 1911, and the dedication being same date but 1915, both astronomical graphs would show the same for midnight day marker, with Sirius rising along horizon in Washington DC, so i am only showing one.
en.wikipedia.org...



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