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do you get actual 4k quality via wireless streaming?

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posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:35 AM
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i bought a 4k tv a month or so ago and i just dont feel like i am getting a true 4k picture.
i know now everything is 4k but netflix originals are supposed to be and i just dont feel like my picture quality is there

it is a sharp roku led

would i get a better picture if i wired it?

i know crap all about tweaking picture settings so i could be way off there too




posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

Let me google that for you.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:46 AM
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4k just feels like a sales gimmick to me.

5p coming soon followed by 6r...

The human eye can only see so much and I think television screens have passed that limit.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 09:49 AM
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originally posted by: bender151
a reply to: TinySickTears

Let me google that for you.


sweet

let me know what you find out



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 10:00 AM
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Yes you can get 4k over wireless. Verizon leverages wireless remote boxes with their new 4k STBs (set top boxes)

TV settings can have a major impact on quality. Have you calibrated it?

Are any motion Interpolation settings disabled preventing SOE (soap opera effect)

You can easily see 4k and HDR content on YouTube.
Stanger Things on Netflix natively does 4k HDR.

Is your TV an LCD or OLED?



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 10:06 AM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
4k just feels like a sales gimmick to me.

5p coming soon followed by 6r...

The human eye can only see so much and I think television screens have passed that limit.


Watch 1080P content VS 2160 and tell me if you don't truly see a difference.

Then watch HDR vs SDR and tell me if you don't see a difference.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 10:10 AM
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originally posted by: opethPA
Yes you can get 4k over wireless. Verizon leverages wireless remote boxes with their new 4k STBs (set top boxes)

TV settings can have a major impact on quality. Have you calibrated it?

Are any motion Interpolation settings disabled preventing SOE (soap opera effect)

You can easily see 4k and HDR content on YouTube.
Stanger Things on Netflix natively does 4k HDR.

Is your TV an LCD or OLED?


pretty sure led
no calibration. not sure how

dont even know what an interpolation setting is

i thought you plugged it in. logged in.
boom 4k



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 10:11 AM
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its this TV

www.bestbuy.com...



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 10:18 AM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears

originally posted by: opethPA
Yes you can get 4k over wireless. Verizon leverages wireless remote boxes with their new 4k STBs (set top boxes)

TV settings can have a major impact on quality. Have you calibrated it?

Are any motion Interpolation settings disabled preventing SOE (soap opera effect)

You can easily see 4k and HDR content on YouTube.
Stanger Things on Netflix natively does 4k HDR.

Is your TV an LCD or OLED?


pretty sure led
no calibration. not sure how

dont even know what an interpolation setting is

i thought you plugged it in. logged in.
boom 4k


In theory you can just plug and play and your content will show what it's going to show meaning you should get 4k assuming your TV is not down scaling.

To get maximum return on quality you need to take some time to maximize the settings of your individual set.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 10:32 AM
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a reply to: opethPA

I've seen the displays in best buy and honestly the top of the line stuff just feels fake.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: opethPA

i just adjusted all my brightness and contrast and such and it seems better



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
a reply to: opethPA

I've seen the displays in best buy and honestly the top of the line stuff just feels fake.


In store TVs are calibrated a certain way to give a specific image that pops with store lighting.

You wouldn't ever run that mode at home as ambient lighting in a house is significantly different.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 10:56 AM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears
a reply to: opethPA

i just adjusted all my brightness and contrast and such and it seems better


These links give some advice for settings...

Rtings.com may have your specific set or model line.

www.sharpusa.com...

itstillworks.com...



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 11:04 AM
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Don't worry 8k is already here, and is soon to be followed by 12k shortly after, 12k is meant to give the picture a 3d feel without glasses and such!!
There are a few websites out there that show you how to calibrate and set up your TV for the best image. Do an internet search with your TV manufacturer and best settings, AVforums have users opinions on best settings.

Also most TV's now have a "store mode" that makes them pop more.
edit on 30-3-2019 by Kurokage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 11:10 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

I think most people can tell the difference between 1080 and 4k if trained properly.



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 12:35 PM
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I don't know but my wifi is slower than molasses and it irritates me that Roku always tries to get the best quality that is available even if your wifi can't support it. If you have a PC and a Roku on a slow connection, one or the other (or both) will experience constant buffering.

I know (for example) that my wifi can probably support two people viewing 480P at the same time. It will not, however, support one person trying to stream full HD and one person trying to watch anything at all in any quality. There should be a setting in there somewhere for the Roku to lower it's demands if it keeps buffering but I haven't seen it.
edit on 30-3-2019 by BrianFlanders because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2019 @ 12:50 PM
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You can also go the bias lighting route to help with eye strain or things likes contrast or other elements.

It's a small tweak that you can do fairly cheap for a 55 inch TV. RGB lighting with a 6500k temp one strip across the top back of the TV.. If your TV has a USB port you can typically power it off of that meaning the RGB strip will power off and on with the TV.

Its a slightly different approach if you have a flush wall mount.

Part of my IT career as a Collaboration Engineer is doing AV deployments for video conferencing which has tied into my Hobbie for audiophile gear so, as you can see, get me started on this topic and I'll talk forever!!!



posted on Mar, 31 2019 @ 03:30 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22
Sorry pal but I can certainly tell the difference between 4k and lower definitions. I do however (of last time I checked anyway) have good vision. I think I read that 8k is already a thing but I don't feel the need to go twice as high as 4k however. And my phone streams 4k perfectly so wireless 4k should be no problem.



posted on Mar, 31 2019 @ 04:12 AM
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When streaming netflix in 4k you will need a estimated dedicated download speed of 25Mbit/s.
Just go to youtube and play the multitude of 4k videos available and check if you get the 4k resolution on wifi.
Perform a download speed test to verify bandwidth capcity if you're unsure



posted on Mar, 31 2019 @ 06:10 AM
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With my failing eye sight and Dementia i am happy for something to just work if i plug it in


justgetflux.com...

For your computer moniter /tv and popcorntime.sh...

They do all i want



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