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If you are scared of spiders... you probably do not want to see this...

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posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:02 PM
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originally posted by: highvein
a reply to: charlyv


There is a huge wasp that stuns the Goliath Birdeater and lays eggs on it. It is suppose to be the size of a small sparrow.


Can you imagine a fear of hornets and encountering that... Now that would give ME nightmares.




posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:08 PM
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Yeah that "possum" is pretty much the size of an average house mouse. The spider is big but not as big as some try and make out. I used to hunt/catch Australian tarantulas to keep as pets for awhile, don't get quite as big as the Goliath Bird eater but still some about the size of a small adult hand (and quite a bit more venomous than the American tarantulas). Have managed to hold a couple in my time, always a good dose of adrenaline.


By the way, just to avoid confusion for those not familiar with the American Possum (or vice versa) - possums in other parts of world, mainly Australia, are extremely cute/cuddly looking things, unlike the ones spoken about here by members from the USA, who are referring to a much larger uglier looking thing that you really wouldn't want to go near, let alone cuddle.

edit on 28/2/19 by Navieko because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:10 PM
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You think thats nasty you should google giant Australian Huntsman spider. Especially Charlotte the Huntsman. They get to be be dinner plate sized. And they're not slow ambling critters like them amazon spiders. Giant Huntsman can move like lightning and even leap...and they love getting inside your house.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:12 PM
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a reply to: BASSPLYR
I got one of those living on my verandah wall at the moment. They look scary but I've grown to appreciate their services in keeping the verandah walls/ceiling clean from too many insects.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:13 PM
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originally posted by: highvein
a reply to: charlyv


There is a huge wasp that stuns the Goliath Birdeater and lays eggs on it. It is suppose to be the size of a small sparrow.


We have a variant of them in the south.. a Pepsis wasp.

Body as big as your thumb and you can see the stinger...

Got stung by one once and it was amazingly bad. I've been stung by pretty much everything from bees, wasps, scorpions, etc.

I later looked up an entomologists thoughts on the effect of the sting.

He said on the scale of stings that the sting of a pepsis wasp is... profound.

If you are stung by one, just lay down and scream... nothing is going to help.

I pretty much agreed with him... it was horrible.




edit on 28-2-2019 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:23 PM
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originally posted by: Lumenari

originally posted by: highvein
a reply to: charlyv


There is a huge wasp that stuns the Goliath Birdeater and lays eggs on it. It is suppose to be the size of a small sparrow.


We have a variant of them in the south.. a Pepsis wasp.

Body as big as your thumb and you can see the stinger...

Got stung by one once and it was amazingly bad. I've been stung by pretty much everything from bees, wasps, scorpions, etc.

I later looked up an entomologists thoughts on the effect of the sting.

He said on the scale of stings that the sting of a pepsis wasp is... profound.

If you are stung by one, just lay down and scream... nothing is going to help.

I pretty much agreed with him... it was horrible.



And that latest GIANT bee article that was roaming the interwebs a few days ago, gawd i laughed at that disinfo bigtime. lol. see I am still laughing.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:27 PM
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a reply to: Shockerking


There are 15 species of Pepsis wasps in North America, some up to four inches long. The most common species in Arizona appears to be Pepsis formosa, a bluish-black wasp with orange wings.


Pepsis wasps have the most painful sting

If you are a normal person, your thumb isn't 4 inches long.

In Oklahoma pepsis wasps can kill small dogs.

I watched it happen once.

Still laughing?



edit on 28-2-2019 by Lumenari because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:33 PM
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a reply to: Navieko

Yeah theyre scary but not aggressive. I hope they go after redbacks too.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:37 PM
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Not scared of spiders, I have 5 tarantulas, had over 20 at one point..that one looks to be a Theraphosa blondi , they do get quite big.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:40 PM
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originally posted by: highvein
a reply to: charlyv


There is a huge wasp that stuns the Goliath Birdeater and lays eggs on it. It is suppose to be the size of a small sparrow.

Called a Tarantula Hawk..bad news for any tarantula.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 08:46 PM
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originally posted by: Shockerking

originally posted by: ClovenSky
a reply to: charlyv

poor Tarantulas, what a bad rap they got....stupid film industry.


f a tarantula should bite you – probably after warning you to back off by raising its front legs and displaying its fangs in a threat posture – it will likely inflict a pain comparable to that resulting from a bee or wasp sting. Brent Hendrixson, in his article, "So You Found A Tarantula!" on the American Tarantula Society internet site, says that the tarantula's "venom is of no medical significance, and contrary to popular belief, nobody has ever died from such a bite…" Read more: www.desertusa.com...
I have had a few tarantulas as pets (some can live up to 25 years) All tarantulas do this rearing up on their hind legs when they sense a threat. But it is also the time to tame the beast and make it a pet, if you so dare. They will do this at a cricket sometime also, even ants. they are very sensitive hunters. And when they do this you can touch, maybe massage their carapiece and let them know you are not a threat.

I had a rose hair tarantula for years and she loved my touches. I have had cats less responsive. She unfourtunately passed in a bad molt at the age of 12 human years (maybe she was older) She was full grown when I bought her. I called her boris after the "The Who" song entitled "Boris the spider" even though she was a female. I actually cried and was very sad for a while for her death.


Old world T's(Asia, Africa) will rear up and assume the strike position. New world(South, North America) are more likely to aim their rear at you and kick the urticating hairs on its rump at you. If pushed to far they might strike.

My bud has a rosy that is over 25 years old and quite healthy.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 09:03 PM
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Once you get used to the idea, they are pretty fascinating. I prefer the more colourful varieties as opposed to huge drab looking ones.
If anyone is interested, these are the species I have.
Brachypelma Boehmei

en.wikipedia.org...

Brachypelma Albiceps

en.wikipedia.org...

Brachypelma Klaasi

en.wikipedia.org...

Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens

en.wikipedia.org...

Monocentropus balfouri

www.theraphosidae.be...
edit on 28-2-2019 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 09:32 PM
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a reply to: BASSPLYR


They get to be be dinner plate sized. And they're not slow ambling critters like them amazon spiders. Giant Huntsman can move like lightning and even leap...


You are correct about the Huntsman however, Tarantulas are lightning quick as well and they too are capable of jumping.

Many people think they are slow ambling creatures cause every time they see them they are walking slowly.
Tarantulas can turn around and strike faster than you can react if they wanted to.

Thankfully they are a defensive creature not an aggressive one.
I currently have 7 tarantulas of 5 different species.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: ShadowLink

Cool, what do you have?



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: vonclod

I currently have:
1x Brachypelma hamorii aka Mexican Red Knee


1x Brachypelma albopilosum aka Curly Hair


1x Brachypelma Vagans aka Mexican Red Rump


2x Lasiadora Parahybana aka Salmon Pink Bird Eater


2x Nhandu Chromatus aka Brazillian Red And White Bird Eater


My favorites are the Nhandu's but they are all beautiful and fascinating animals.
Love watching them dig.

You have a nice collection too, one day soon I hope to have at least one M. Balfouri, awesome webbers.
edit on 28-2-2019 by ShadowLink because: Added pics



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 09:49 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

I like spiders but when they cross my path, y ea they be dead.... after I scream a bit



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 09:51 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

Just nuke-em from orbit it's the only way to be sure.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: ShadowLink

Then you should appreciate this band....




posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 09:57 PM
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Ive never understood peoples fear of something smaller than them. Its a spider, big deal they serve a very important purpose along with possums. They both get such a bad rap in my opinion
Nice find OP thank you for sharing.



posted on Feb, 28 2019 @ 10:00 PM
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originally posted by: charlyv
a reply to: carewemust
I went to the island Vieques (off PR). We rented a nice little villa near the coast on a small mountain. At night, when we came back from the village of Isabella, there were tarantula's all over the screens and door. They were not very big about a few inches, but no one would enter the place. We stayed out until daylight to get back in. Scary little critters.


I rented a Hertz car in Hawaii that was full of spiders. Very un-nerving driving at night and feeling things crawling up your legs like that. Made a U-turn and took it right back.

The replacement was free and upgraded.




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