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Magnetic diodes have been created

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posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 12:18 AM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
Some people just wanna start crap and don't actually want to discuss anything.


Sadly, I find that statement incredibly fascinating, the fact that many cannot discuss something as simple as an electrical circuit without embarrassing themselves is beyond extraordinary.




posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 05:47 AM
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It is also important to note that they are using a tunneling method via metamaterials that can act with properties that seem...Counter-intuitive?
a reply to: projectvxn

seems to me like it fits in with the Electric Universe concept



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 06:16 AM
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a reply to: projectvxn

My implication isn't to get rid of heat in the magnetic diode device. My idea is that this device could be used to remove heat from a near super conductive circuit, such as to put it over the edge.

Whatever energy is used to generate the diode, or heat generated there in, is not really an issue to the idea. I'm suggesting this can take a little strain off the near super conductive circuit by removing aspects of any interferring magnetic reactance.

No magic going on, or implied. Suggesting this to supplement, not replace nor have direct interaction.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 09:15 AM
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Quite the interesting article(s). One main reason magnetism hasn't been studied to the extent electrical fields have is that we can control electrical current flow through the use of properly chosen insulators and conductors. Until now, the very idea of a magnetic insulator was science fiction. Yet, the wave guides referenced are doing just that: acting as magnetic insulators. Now, add in the diode effects, and while a true monopole would still not be possible, a simulated one would be. That will open up a lot of interest in the physics of magnetism.

Great find, and thanks for sharing!

TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 09:32 AM
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a reply to: JohnnyJetson




seems to me like it fits in with the Electric Universe concept


Why?



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 09:43 AM
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a reply to: Archivalist

In a superconducting circuit resistance is zero.

The byproduct of resistance is waste heat. There isn't going to be any waste heat in a superconducting circuit.

Diodes aren't generated.

en.wikipedia.org...

Inductive Reactance is the resistance to a change in the flow of current. Something to take into account withing AC circuits. It is measured in Ohms like a typical resistive circuit.

In an oscillating magnetic field, inductive reactance needs to be taken into account, not just for total circuit impedance, but for timing with regard to change in current direction. That WILL have an effect here. But it won't take any "strain" off of a superconducting circuit.
edit on 7 1 19 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 09:47 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

You can't simulate a monopole without making it a Vs in a circuit.

Not sure if we'll be able to do that with this technology, but that is a fair bit beyond my ability to speculate.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:10 AM
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a reply to: projectvxn


You can't simulate a monopole without making it a Vs in a circuit.

Not sure I understand your point. The simulation I was speaking of was that using a magnetic diode and the accompanying waveguide, it seems to be possible to create, say, a north pole without a connected south pole (except of course by the waveguide). That fits the technical definition of a monopole, even though there is an associated south pole located some distance away but without a disturbance pathway between them. At least that's how I read things, that the waveguide would effectively isolate the flux path.

In any case, it's a fascinating development. I do a lot of work centering around magnetic phenomena (four projects right now that use magnetic forces). I'll be following this.

TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 10:39 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck




Not sure I understand your point.


Monopoles generate their own energy when in motion. You'd have to treat it as a voltage source in any simulation in which a monopole is used.

EDIT:

This is for the simulation of electrical circuits. I understand that other simulations do not have to take place in an electrical circuit.




The simulation I was speaking of was that using a magnetic diode and the accompanying waveguide, it seems to be possible to create, say, a north pole without a connected south pole


But the south pole is still connected and not isolated from the north pole in this system. You'd have to come up with a way to isolate a single pole, and we haven't been able to do that.

Monopoles are quantized "magnetic charge" and this diode doesn't turn typical N/S magnetic fields into single N or S fields. I think the headlines might look different if that were the case.

This thread discusses the results of one such simulation, but it is mostly speculative on my part with regard to the use of monopoles in technology.

Monopoles would be able to produce their own voltage and would have to be treated like a source and isolated as such in any equations.

While monopoles are well-described mathematically, their applications in electronics have not really been realized and for obvious reasons.

edit on 7 1 19 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)

edit on 7 1 19 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 11:14 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck




In any case, it's a fascinating development. I do a lot of work centering around magnetic phenomena (four projects right now that use magnetic forces). I'll be following this.


I'm just a huge nerd. Magnetics don't really come into play in my line of work.

I work with piezoelectric print technology adapted for medical treatments of the eye.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 05:31 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

I know that a super conductive circuit has no resistance or waste heat.

I mean to apply this to the circuit in the pre-conductive stage, when it does have resistance/waste heat and magnetic impedance present.

This should be able to lower the bar, maybe by a near negligible amount, but certainly some amount of effect will be measurable at large scale.

Given the speed of a magnetic field, shouldn't this allow for a forced current, if you were to strobe or pulse this effect? So, some amount of magnetic resonance/ on and off fluctuation, in one direction, controlled by a precision dial, should force an electron flow where there isn't/wasn't one. It could push electrons over breakdown gaps. That first arc to complete a circuit by force, would probably contribute, "waste heat" ideas aside.

I'd be willing to use less coolant, if this saves any amount of Liquid N, He, or otherwise.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

Don't think it means perpetual motion engines or the like just yet. LoL

But the possibilities seem rather abundant if it does what it says on the tin.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 05:51 PM
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a reply to: Archivalist

Ok. I get what you are saying.

This research is very preliminary. Speculating beyond uses in transformers isn't all that helpful as much of this research hasn't been scaled down.

When you add superconducting circuits into the mix, they tend to change how the math works. You are correct to say that in such a circuit inductive reactance would be the only component of impedance.
edit on 7 1 19 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



Edit:

I'm just not sure what that would mean for this research.
edit on 7 1 19 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 07:20 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

You misunderstand what I am saying... there is no such thing (that we know of) as a magnetic monopole. A few theories have been advanced, but thus far no one has ever found one.

With dipole magnets, the poles are close enough together that no experimentation can take place which assumes a monopole. The connecting material between the north and south poles is not isolated from the experiment and thus contaminates it. We cannot even determine how a magnetic monopole would work.

If the waveguide can isolate the connecting flux far enough from the other pole, and if it can isolate the connecting flux from the experiment, it might be possible to gather some information on how a magnetic monopole might work, should we ever find one. It in no way means a magnetic monopole is even possible, much less that one has actually been created.

TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

I am aware that monopoles are not currently known to exist.

But thank you for clearing that up (referring to your simulation idea).

I think this boils down to pole isolation something I think both of us saw right away, in order for a monopole to be simulated.

We have mathematically ideal monopole simulations already. But it would be interesting to see a non-ideal system simulate an approximate monopole.

Space-bending simulation of magnetic monopole interactions with atoms along a set path:
phys.org...
edit on 7 1 19 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 09:11 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Stable oscillating magnetic fields is a scientific breakthrough that will lead to a lot of new magnetic technologies. On page one I mentioned efficient and well-balanced transformers being one of the many technologies that could come from this.

But if you want a little potential "out there"? Stable, oscillating magnetic fields make ideal anti-matter bottles.

While we can already create reasonably stable magnetic fields and have a good understanding of magnet traps and magnetic bottles, further stabilization of magnetic fields by being able to control their transfer unidirectionally gives us two potential gifts. The ability to create antimatter conduits and maybe even Star Trek's antimatter injectors used to feed the antimatter generator (warp core) that powers the ship. We may actually be able to create a system where we can control matter/antimatter annihilation events as we see fit using highly stabilized magnetic fields.

The other gift would be highly efficient energy transfer devices. This could be the technology that modernizes our power grids.

I have no idea if any of that (Star Trek stuff) will work. But magnetic bottles are a thing and they have been used to successfully capture antihydrogen atoms. Being able to move anti-particles along a selected path via highly stable, tunable magnetic fields could make something like that possible.

Forgot to add:

Back in 2010 was when we first successfully captured antimatter using a specialized magnetic bottle.
newscenter.lbl.gov...
edit on 7 1 19 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)

edit on 7 1 19 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 09:40 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

Well, let's not create any significant amounts of antimatter nor store it anywhere here on Earth eh?

Scientific breakthrough this may well be, but possible future reasonably stable magnetic fields confining antimatter in magnetic bubbles in a bottle or otherwise, sod's law and all that jazz!

Could take us to the Stars(a star) all the same in around 50 years, if we did manage to make the stuff in significant quantities off world......outer planetary moon just to be safe.



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

The level of engineering required for any such feat for use in space travel would be monumental. Might be a very long while before we actually see practical uses of antimatter.

I think this technology has more 'here and now' applications as previously mentioned.
edit on 7 1 19 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2019 @ 11:51 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

Bombs would be my guess first im afraid.

But imagine the likes of say miro antimatter tipped bullets. Quite a bang there.

The level of engineering required would indeed be monumental then again look where we have come in only a few hundred years scientifically and technologically speaking.

If we ever devise a means to travel even our own system effectively we will be in there like swimwear, might even save our race.




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