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Scientists Find Source of Bizarre Space Object 'Oumuamua

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posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 03:20 PM
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Haven't heard anything on this in a while. When first reported, speculation was rampant as to it being a Mothership among other things.
Space is fascinating, I wish I had dedicated more time learning about it.

One thing that caught my eye in this article is this:

The research is based on data gathered in June that suggested 'Oumuamua wasn't just hurtling through space willy-nilly. Instead, it seemed like when the object was near the sun, it picked up a bit of extra speed, as if, like a comet, it carried something like ice that could turn to water vapor and propel the object forward a little faster than usual.

My question is, if it continually picks up speed with each migration around the sun. Could this object at some point change from it's normal course. Potentially be a threat to us?


Ever since astronomers spotted 'Oumuamua, the first-ever object from beyond our solar system, it has offered more questions than answers: — What is it? Where did it come from? Why is it so darn weird? But a team of scientists has announced they may have made major progress on that second question, narrowing down the object's origins to just four stars. The research is based on data gathered in June that suggested 'Oumuamua wasn't just hurtling through space willy-nilly. Instead, it seemed like when the object was near the sun, it picked up a bit of extra speed, as if, like a comet, it carried something like ice that could turn to water vapor and propel the object forward a little faster than usual.



Accounting for that fact nudged 'Oumuamua's entry trajectory into our solar system a bit. (Scientists only spotted the object on its way out of the solar system, then had to retrace its path to track its origin.) Then, the scientists consulted a huge batch of data produced by the European Space Agency's Gaia mission to pinpoint the precise locations of stars. That atlas is important not just to allow scientists to identify potential source solar systems, but also to calculate how nearby stars and their gravity tugged the object off-course along its journey. Combining those two pieces of information, the team identified four possible stars that could have birthed 'Oumuamua: red dwarf HIP 3757, sunlike star HD 292249, and two other stars without such manageable nicknames as of yet.




0 MORE Partner Series Scientists Find Source of Bizarre Space Object 'Oumuamua An artist's depiction of Oumuamua, the first detected interstellar object. Credit: M. Kornmesser/ESO Ever since astronomers spotted 'Oumuamua, the first-ever object from beyond our solar system, it has offered more questions than answers: — What is it? Where did it come from? Why is it so darn weird? But a team of scientists has announced they may have made major progress on that second question, narrowing down the object's origins to just four stars. The research is based on data gathered in June that suggested 'Oumuamua wasn't just hurtling through space willy-nilly. Instead, it seemed like when the object was near the sun, it picked up a bit of extra speed, as if, like a comet, it carried something like ice that could turn to water vapor and propel the object forward a little faster than usual. Advertisement Accounting for that fact nudged 'Oumuamua's entry trajectory into our solar system a bit. (Scientists only spotted the object on its way out of the solar system, then had to retrace its path to track its origin.) Then, the scientists consulted a huge batch of data produced by the European Space Agency's Gaia mission to pinpoint the precise locations of stars. That atlas is important not just to allow scientists to identify potential source solar systems, but also to calculate how nearby stars and their gravity tugged the object off-course along its journey. Combining those two pieces of information, the team identified four possible stars that could have birthed 'Oumuamua: red dwarf HIP 3757, sunlike star HD 292249, and two other stars without such manageable nicknames as of yet. Astronomers believe that 'Oumuamua (the name means "messenger from afar arriving first" in Hawaiian) must have come from a solar system with at least one large gas giant planet in order for it to have been kicked out and set off across the universe. As of yet, all four candidate stars are planet-less — but that could always change. The new research is described in a paper posted Sept. 24 to the preprint site arXiv.org and has been accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal.


Is their anything in regards to the name:
'Oumuamua (the name means "messenger from afar arriving first" in Hawaiian)

www.livescience.com...

edit on 26-9-2018 by Sabrechucker because: add




posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 03:36 PM
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The Davidians got the wrong comet. Joke's on them.



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: Sabrechucker


I posted this yesterday on the original thread (love the spelling mistake!) - Astroid from outside the solar system, or something else?.

Since it is travelling away from us, it will probably not be a threat any time soon. Hopefully, we as a species will already be going to the stars by the time it returns!



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 03:55 PM
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originally posted by: Kharron
The Davidians got the wrong comet. Joke's on them.


The Davidians? Didn't know they were a comet cult but I could be wrong. I'm reminded of Adam Schiff's cult:

Heaven's Gate




Sabre: Is Oumuamua speeding up each pass or only momentarily after near sun approach?




edit on 26-9-2018 by The GUT because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF



. Hopefully, we as a species will already be going to the stars by the time it returns!



I admire your optimism but it won't be in our lifetimes if ever.



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 04:22 PM
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Just because the trajectory points at some stars doesn't mean that's where it came from, you silly scientists. In a couple million years, an alien will track its trajectory which clearly shows that it came from our solar system, and possibly even launched by us.



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: The GUT

it appears it only accelerates at at certain point. Just wondering if it will carry momentum with each pass



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 04:51 PM
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a reply to: Sabrechucker


I think it is leaving our solar system hurtling away very fast with too much energy and speed to come back again, unless there is some other kind of Newtonian physics 'intervention', like this object braking or slowing down somehow.


edit on 26-9-2018 by Fowlerstoad because: changed a verb tense



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: Wide-Eyes
I admire your optimism but it won't be in our lifetimes if ever.

I understood that it was on a hyperbolic trajectory and not elliptical, so it ain't coming back.



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Ding ding!!!!



edit on 26-9-2018 by Fowlerstoad because: added a smiley face



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 04:56 PM
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a reply to: Wide-Eyes


'Oumuamua took over 7 million years to get here which is kind of the point.

I never said anything about "our life time" which is also part of the point. But we are getting closer to nuclear fusion and a million years is an awful long time. Maybe fusion will happen in my lifetime (prolly already has in some dark military guarded building nobody can get to (*ahem* *lock heed* *cough, cough*).

@The GUT, the trajectory is beyond the solar system. It is most likely its one and only pass. It truly is "inter stellar" and is heading away from us back to interstellar space.



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 06:57 PM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
a reply to: Sabrechucker


I posted this yesterday on the original thread (love the spelling mistake!) - Astroid from outside the solar system, or something else?.

Since it is travelling away from us, it will probably not be a threat any time soon. Hopefully, we as a species will already be going to the stars by the time it returns!


This planet will be dead by then. We'll be lucky to make 2100.



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 07:58 PM
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It's one of them gypsy gods got their pecker whacked off.



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 08:18 PM
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a reply to: Sabrechucker

Sure its not one of these …??

www.youtube.com...



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 08:21 PM
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Good for them, I'm still trying to figure out how to pronounce its name.



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 09:39 PM
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The pre print of the paper is here:

arxiv.org...

Plausible home stars of the interstellar object 'Oumuamua found in Gaia DR2

Authors:

Bailer-Jones et al

Abstract:[/b]


The first detected interstellar object 'Oumuamua that passed within 0.25au of the Sun on 2017 September 9 was presumably ejected from a stellar system. We use its newly determined non-Keplerian trajectory together with the reconstructed Galactic orbits of 7 million stars from Gaia DR2 to identify past close encounters. Such an "encounter" could reveal the home system from which 'Oumuamua was ejected. The closest encounter, at 0.60pc (0.53-0.67pc, 90% confidence interval), was with the M2.5 dwarf HIP 3757 at a relative velocity of 24.7km/s, 1Myr ago. A more distant encounter (1.6pc) but with a lower encounter (ejection) velocity of 10.7km/s was with the G5 dwarf HD 292249, 3.8Myr ago. Two more stars have encounter distances and velocities intermediate to these. The encounter parameters are similar across six different non-gravitational trajectories for 'Oumuamua. Ejection of 'Oumuamua by scattering from a giant planet in one of the systems is plausible, but requires a rather unlikely configuration to achieve the high velocities found. A binary star system is more likely to produce the observed velocities. None of the four home candidates have published exoplanets or are known to be binaries. Given that the 7 million stars in Gaia DR2 with 6D phase space information is just a small fraction of all stars for which we can eventually reconstruct orbits, it is a priori unlikely that our current search would find 'Oumuamua's home star system. As 'Oumuamua is expected to pass within 1pc of about 20 stars and brown dwarfs every Myr, the plausibility of a home system depends also on an appropriate (low) encounter velocity.


edit on 26-9-2018 by anzha because: added some details for the paper.



posted on Sep, 27 2018 @ 01:00 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Just because the trajectory points at some stars doesn't mean that's where it came from, you silly scientists. In a couple million years, an alien will track its trajectory which clearly shows that it came from our solar system, and possibly even launched by us.


Well... claiming it came from the general direction of those 4 stars doesn't necessarily mean that was its origin and I'm not sure the silly scientists intended it that way. That was just it's most recent stop before Earth.

I wonder what the odds are of an asteroid visiting 3 or more star systems? Does it have better odds of being ejected from the galaxy? Distances between stars are vast...

Maybe this one will go intergalactic, and the universe will die a heat death before it reaches another star. Maybe we should've called it Hawaiian for "lonely traveler". It has no home... I'm kind of honored it ran away from its homestar, committing the ultimate rebellious act, just to spend a few months with us...

Even though it ended, we should just be happy we got to spend some time together.

When most people think of a space probe visiting us, they think of a technological device. Why not embed it within an asteroid? I bet you that was the alien version of a spy satellite.

Looking at the artist's representation I would really love to see gravitational forces snap it in two like a bread stick. Am I the only one or does it just seem like there is a primal urge to break that thing?



posted on Sep, 27 2018 @ 06:01 AM
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a reply to: Sabrechucker

Has anyone thought this could have been 'Nibiru' 'planet x' which has been discussed on ats many times? I know it was supposed to be a planet but maybe the people back then thought to describe it as a planet and maybe was a lot larger in size but has since had chunks of it broken off?? So it was rather a large Asteroid instead? Just saying as 'Nibiru' was supposed to make a pass last year..



posted on Sep, 27 2018 @ 08:04 AM
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myself... I entertain the notion that the object from interstellar space which whizzed past our Sun towards the constellation Pegasus was a prophecied 'sign'...


the stranger Asteroid object showed up & notably Sped past our Sun 9 September 2017... at the very onset of the wonderous sign in the Heavens we know as the Constellation Virgo...

in prophecy the Woman (Virgo) is clothed in-the-Sun, with the Moon at-her-feet, and wears a Crown of 12 Stars... also known as the Revelation 12 Sign-in-the-Heavens (a big deal & ruckus came & went about this September 2017 'Birthing Event')


so, I guess I stand alone in identifying the stranger Asteroid as the promised 'Sign'... the Sign given by Hebrew Prophets was termed the Sign of the Son-of-Man which would be a prophetic time-line signal for the faithful on the Earth that would accompany the Revelation 12 Sign of the Woman in the Heavens: with a 12 jewel Crown/bathed in the Sun/& the Moon at her feet


Earth scientists dubbed the other worldly traveler -> Oumuamua -> (Oh - Moo-ah - Moo-ah)
and I recognize it as 'Son-of-Man' object that has traveled the 26,000 light years from the Galactic Core Black Hole region to intersect the Sun in our Solar System as promised in religious Prophecy over 2,000 years ago

just stretching the limits of my imagination with ya'll



posted on Sep, 30 2018 @ 10:09 AM
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So, in other words.....the source of this object has NOT been identified.



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