It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Before skinwalkers were called skinwalkers

page: 2
8
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 11:19 AM
link   

originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: underwerks




Most Native Americans won’t even talk about them or say their real name out loud.


Interesting. Springers and the recent AMA on the skin walker ranch - suggests there is some anomaly there, that you don't mess with. I guess calling its name would bring in all sorts of trouble if it is an egregore hanging around.


From what I’ve read it’s mostly the Native American name that they won’t say out loud, though most people on the reservation won’t even bring the subject up for fear that it might start stalking them,

I won’t type the name here for obvious reasons lol but it’s easily found with a search.




posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 11:28 AM
link   
a reply to: underwerks

I've never heard anyone name any names other than the navajo name for skinwalker????



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 11:42 AM
link   

originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask
a reply to: underwerks

I've never heard anyone name any names other than the navajo name for skinwalker????


That’s the one I’m talking about, it starts with a y.

Call me crazy, superstitious, whatever. I’m not even going to test it after the experience I had.



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 12:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: underwerks

originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask
a reply to: underwerks

I've never heard anyone name any names other than the navajo name for skinwalker????


That’s the one I’m talking about, it starts with a y.

Call me crazy, superstitious, whatever. I’m not even going to test it after the experience I had.


Well can't say I blame ya bud........



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 05:32 PM
link   

originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask

originally posted by: mysterioustranger
a reply to: JAGStorm

Shapeshifters. To the Native Americans...Shapeshifters and Skinwalkers for 1,000 years.

Nothing's changed...just because non-natives are now talking about it.

What the point? You're whole premise talks only about the last 30 yrs of internet or so.

You're about 970 yrs late to the common acceptance by us. (Cherokee- me-1/2)..and all tribes. Go ask a shaman...


Thanks..... That was what I was trying to articulate as well


I wasn't thinking of this when I posted...but I actually know a Shaman here in Michigan...haven't seen him in about 6 months, but am gonna try to reach him for some clarifications!

I know he's on reservation surrounded by tribal leaders and initiates. He also makes charms/dreamcatchers for those who ask for any purpose other than negative.

I've known him 40 yrs...gonna try to reach out...I'll get back to all.



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 05:36 PM
link   

originally posted by: Jefferton
Native Americans don't have super powers.

They can however, get crazy drunk and tell wild stories.

But can't we all?

My gramps was an MP in the late 50s out at Ft. Huachuca In AZ and a spent a lot of time dealing with drunk native Americans, just a side anticdote.

Native American legends have always interested me and they’re a fascinating people, skin walkers have always been an interesting subject.



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 05:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: mysterioustranger

Imagine that, me telling a story from my perspective!
Something has changed, if more people are talking about it then ever before.

I never doubted for one minute that it wasn't always known or accepted by the tribes. However I don't think it was
known or talked about a lot by non-tribes.

I pointed to


I do believe that what my dad was referencing was skinwalkers
to show, it was not something easily looked up or talked about at that time (again by non native), but that his personal story seems to reflect those of what we now (non-natives) know as skinwalkers.

Regardless of what you personally believe and grown up with, a lot of people still do not believe in these things. I think every story shared can help deeper people's understanding.

I always thought that is what ATS was about, sharing stories , experiences and beliefs of the paranormal, conspiracy and other off the grid types of discussions.




Sir? Very well written and stated. I should have nodded to the intent and points of your post.

I am reaching out to a shaman friend here in Northern Michigan. He will be glad to shed insight into the basis of the Shapeshifters and/or Skinwalkers (although little to do with the para-normal ranch of the same moniker).

Best, MS



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 06:00 PM
link   
a reply to: mysterioustranger

It's not Sir, it's Madame,

I'd love to hear from your shaman friend if they are so inclined to talk about it.

My dad is part Iroquois and the men he was talking with were Native but I'm not sure if they were local and/or Navajo. All I remember is he came back from that military exercise and mentioned the story I told in my OP. Native Americans shifting, getting from A to b faster than a car and it was in the desert of New Mexico.



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 07:02 AM
link   

originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: mysterioustranger

It's not Sir, it's Madame,

I'd love to hear from your shaman friend if they are so inclined to talk about it.

My dad is part Iroquois and the men he was talking with were Native but I'm not sure if they were local and/or Navajo. All I remember is he came back from that military exercise and mentioned the story I told in my OP. Native Americans shifting, getting from A to b faster than a car and it was in the desert of New Mexico.




'Apologies, profusely Madam! Not a great way to start off my morning...tho I do regret my reference to you.

Going further...Chippewa, Algonquin, Iroquois are in some abundance still here in Michigan...either full blood or descendants of....

My shamanic friend surrounds himself with 4 tribal mates/leaders with him each day...I can reach him by phone, but must go thru the 4 in person.

I do know he will discuss things..but will not speak it by name as mentioned above..to do so brings it forward and gives it strength.

I'll be getting back to everyone soon..

Apologies again, madam!...
.

edit on 26-9-2018 by mysterioustranger because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2018 @ 06:33 PM
link   
a reply to: underwerks

That makes sense

thanks



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 10:33 PM
link   
a reply to: JAGStorm

I am Navajo, lived on the rez for several years. I learned about skinwalkers at a young age, and even had terrifying experiences in the Shonto and Manyfarms areas that i cant explain.

I am working on a fictional book based on Navajo mythology, and i am open to questions about what the Navajo call Yaniglooshi, or It Goes On All Fours.
edit on 28-9-2018 by HAZE3 because: Misspellings



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 10:38 PM
link   
a reply to: HAZE3

Glad I caught you on here.

My main question is the speed. I understand there is some shapeshifting or turning into some other being/creature.
How are they able to travel so fast? Are they truly running, or is something else happening?

My other question, are they the same as werewolves? This is what I recall my dad mentioning.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 11:06 PM
link   
a reply to: JAGStorm

So as it was taught to me by my father, a medicine man must do a specific type of ceremony that transforms a man into an animal. The specifics of the cereomony i do not know, like most Navajos will not, and when ive asked several of my families medicine men about it, they claim they do not know it. Be aware that Navajo culture walks a very thin line of what is taboo, and what isnt, and like it has already been stated here, most Navajos wont talk about it to avoid attracting a skinwalker.

Now to the origin of the transformation ceremony, i was taught that before the time of horses, if a medicine man needed a specific herb to heal a deathly illness, he would tranform a man into an animal to go retrieve those herbs if they were typically located in a distant region.

Like people do to all things, people corrupted it for evil purposes. There is also a Navajo Myth about how the Coyote taught a woman how to perform an evil ceremony to transform herself into a bear to seek revenge on her brothers for killing her husband. As for what i know, this is the earliest Navajo story of a skinwalker.

As for the speed, i have heard experiences of skinwalkers easily running along side vehicles, and even yanking people out of the back of pickup trucks to kill them. Whether they are true, i do not know. But for my own experience, if what i have seen were indeed skinwalkers, it moved at the speed of a sprinting wild dog.



posted on Sep, 28 2018 @ 11:13 PM
link   
a reply to: JAGStorm

i have also heard of them traveling in the wind of dust storms, but again, no first hand experience of that.

As for your other question, they are similar to werewolves in that they transform, but they can come in several types of animals, and seem to do it at will. Also their abilities have been said to carry over into their human form.



posted on Sep, 30 2018 @ 03:09 PM
link   
a reply to: HAZE3

Another question,

Is what we know as Bigfoot actually a skinwalker?



posted on Oct, 1 2018 @ 07:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: HAZE3

Another question,

Is what we know as Bigfoot actually a skinwalker?


In my opinion, no.

Is it possible? Sure.




top topics



 
8
<< 1   >>

log in

join