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Before skinwalkers were called skinwalkers

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posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 08:47 AM
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It was the early 1980's. My dad was in the military at the time.
He was doing a project in New Mexico although we didn't live there.

I will always remember the following conversation we had. He had a few guys working with him that were Native American.
They all spoke about people (Native Americans) that could shift and run the desert and get from point a to b faster than any man or even car could take them.

They were all perplexed about how this took place. My dad said he believed they shifted into a wolf or coyote or some other animal. But the weird part is they could get from A to B faster than a car, I vividly remember this and that it was only Native Americans that could do this.
He spoke about it as absolute fact. My dad is a super serious non superstitious type of person.

There was no internet at the time, there wasn't a lot of stories or accounts about it at the time. I do believe that what my dad was referencing was skinwalkers. I don't know if it is something paranormal, a military project or what. I do believe that there has always been something happening there that is unexplainable.




posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 09:01 AM
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Native Americans don't have super powers.

They can however, get crazy drunk and tell wild stories.

But can't we all?




posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

So your dad told you stories when you were a kid?

Interesting...



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 09:14 AM
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a reply to: watchitburn

What I was trying to illustrate is that things were said/believed long before it became popular.
I think where there's smoke there is fire and these are more than stories.

Some people will never believe things until they see it or experience it themselves and there are others that believe there is more to this world than what we can explain.



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 09:17 AM
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They were always called skin walkers or similar. Even in Navajo...... Which is where the translation came from.......

So..... No offense but I don't get this post...
edit on 9/25/2018 by ManBehindTheMask because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 09:33 AM
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a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

Maybe my title is misleading.

I think it is very common to call them skinwalkers now, maybe that is what they have always been known as to the Navajo, but that was not the name that was commonly used before at least to outsiders (even if talking about the same thing)

From what I recall it seemed as if the story my dad told was more akin to werewolves or dogman something of the like, that could run very fast. Next time I talk to him I will ask him if he remember any more details.

The point of my post was to show there was talk/sightings/beliefs about these things long before they were commonly known to the masses as skinwalkers



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

That's because not everyone speaks Navajo...... But that's literally the translation..... And its an ancient one.... Before "werewolves" were a thing........

Not trying to be a dk....... Just saying boss....



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 09:43 AM
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originally posted by: Jefferton
Native Americans don't have super powers.

They can however, get crazy drunk and tell wild stories.

But can't we all?



...and then there is the peyote.



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: ManBehindTheMask

Just think about bigfoot,
how many names are used to describe what many consider the same thing??
Sasquatch, Yeti,Yowie,Almas, skunkape, thegrassman, Wendigo, Orang Pendek,Yeren and more.

Just because you believe it is called bigfoot, and you call it that, and that is the literal translation does not mean that is what everyone called it. Does not mean stories about bigfoot that people called skunk ape are not true or valid.

I'm not sure what your point is, that everyone in history must have only have called it skinwalker?
If you're not trying to be a dk.. don't be one.



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

They are called different depending On the region and what the language is.....Pacific northwest indigenous peoples aren't going to call bigfoot "yowie" because it isn't their language......

The skinwalker is a translation from Navajo..... And is unique to the region.... As far as lore and attributes...

So I'm. Not sure what your point is either...

Call me whatever you want..... I really don't care
edit on 9/25/2018 by ManBehindTheMask because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Here’s an encounter I had in Arizona:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Something I forgot about when I typed it up:

As I was leaving my motel that morning I stopped at a little Native American gas station to grab a cigar, and for some reason I felt compelled to tell the older Native American man working the register about what I saw. I was thoroughly freaked out at that point. He just laughed in a weird way and said “Usually they don’t mess with white people..”



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 10:00 AM
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originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask
They were always called skin walkers or similar. Even in Navajo...... Which is where the translation came from.......

So..... No offense but I don't get this post...
...well considering the OP said, "job in New Mexico", you know, kinda the spot where Navajos are...just saying boss...



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 10:02 AM
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originally posted by: underwerks
a reply to: JAGStorm

Here’s an encounter I had in Arizona:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Something I forgot about when I typed it up:

As I was leaving my motel that morning I stopped at a little Native American gas station to grab a cigar, and for some reason I felt compelled to tell the older Native American man working the register about what I saw. I was thoroughly freaked out at that point. He just laughed in a weird way and said “Usually they don’t mess with white people..”


Skinwalkers are Racist?



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 10:07 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

I absolutely believe you and what an experience!!! You can tell people, and they can think whatever they want and some may not believe, but you know what you experienced. That is why I keep an open mind on things. You just never know.

Btw. We have a photo somewhere of our family standing on the four corners. We always thought that was neat little spot. Very mystical area out there.

While my dad was in New Mexico he purchased some handmade jewelry from a Native man. I've had it for many years, but every time I see it I think of his story I posted above.



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Shapeshifters. To the Native Americans...Shapeshifters and Skinwalkers for 1,000 years.

Nothing's changed...just because non-natives are now talking about it.

What the point? You're whole premise talks only about the last 30 yrs of internet or so.

You're about 970 yrs late to the common acceptance by us. (Cherokee- me-1/2)..and all tribes. Go ask a shaman...



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 10:18 AM
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originally posted by: mysterioustranger
a reply to: JAGStorm

Shapeshifters. To the Native Americans...Shapeshifters and Skinwalkers for 1,000 years.

Nothing's changed...just because non-natives are now talking about it.

What the point? You're whole premise talks only about the last 30 yrs of internet or so.

You're about 970 yrs late to the common acceptance by us. (Cherokee- me-1/2)..and all tribes. Go ask a shaman...


Thanks..... That was what I was trying to articulate as well



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

You’d have to ask them. Considering they supposedly kill close family members and have sex with corpses “racist” is pretty far down the list of things I’d call them.

After I had that experience I spent some time reading up on them and they do seem to only bother Native Americans. There’s some reports of “outsiders” being bothered by them but it’s mostly Native families. Maybe it has to do with there only being Native Americans on the reservation? My experience happened right outside of a Navajo reservation.

Most Native Americans won’t even talk about them or say their real name out loud.


edit on 25-9-2018 by underwerks because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 10:24 AM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: underwerks

I absolutely believe you and what an experience!!! You can tell people, and they can think whatever they want and some may not believe, but you know what you experienced. That is why I keep an open mind on things. You just never know.

Btw. We have a photo somewhere of our family standing on the four corners. We always thought that was neat little spot. Very mystical area out there.

While my dad was in New Mexico he purchased some handmade jewelry from a Native man. I've had it for many years, but every time I see it I think of his story I posted above.





This was the one experience that changed things for me. Afterwards I couldn’t help but to ask myself if this thing is out there, then what else is that isn’t supposed to be?

I couldn’t care less if anyone believes me or not, I saw what I saw. And that’s enough for me.

ETA: 4 corners is beautiful. But now when I drive through there I schedule my trip so I’m only driving through when it’s daylight. I try to make the drive across New Mexico and Arizona in one go. I’ve read that once they get your “scent” or whatever, they can always find you again. I’m not sure if that’s true but I’d rather not take any chances.
edit on 25-9-2018 by underwerks because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

Imagine that, me telling a story from my perspective!
Something has changed, if more people are talking about it then ever before.

I never doubted for one minute that it wasn't always known or accepted by the tribes. However I don't think it was
known or talked about a lot by non-tribes.

I pointed to


I do believe that what my dad was referencing was skinwalkers
to show, it was not something easily looked up or talked about at that time (again by non native), but that his personal story seems to reflect those of what we now (non-natives) know as skinwalkers.

Regardless of what you personally believe and grown up with, a lot of people still do not believe in these things. I think every story shared can help deeper people's understanding.

I always thought that is what ATS was about, sharing stories , experiences and beliefs of the paranormal, conspiracy and other off the grid types of discussions.



posted on Sep, 25 2018 @ 11:11 AM
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a reply to: underwerks




Most Native Americans won’t even talk about them or say their real name out loud.


Interesting. Springers and the recent AMA on the skin walker ranch - suggests there is some anomaly there, that you don't mess with. I guess calling its name would bring in all sorts of trouble if it is an egregore hanging around.




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