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Huge "rogue" planet discovered roaming aimlessly outside our solar system

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posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

I read it was something to do with how much mass for deuterium fusion to occur in the core of the object; around 13 time the mass of Jupiter. This object is 12.7 * the mass of Jupiter, so almost a brown dwarf from that description.
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The definition you provided makes more sense to me, though. Ie from an accretion disk=planet, gravitational collapse=star.

I was trying to wrap my mind around the chemistry of the first explanation and this was so more on point for me.




posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 07:13 PM
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originally posted by: subfab
a reply to: Riffrafter

it may not be Nibiru, but it's still cool to me.
i hope one day we find the real Nibiru.


Perhaps it is down between the cushions at the back of the couch?

That's where I find lots of things like lost keys and loose change.




posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 07:24 PM
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12.7 times more massive than Jupiter and with a radius 1.22 that of our gassy neighbour.


Why would they not use Uranus as our gassy neighbor?



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: Zarniwoop

Since it's talking about size it would make sense to compare it to the largest planet in the Solar System.



Oh. Wait. I see what you did there. Gassy...Uranus. It's a joke, right?



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: Phage


It's a joke, right?


Yes.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 08:37 PM
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This object is drifting in space. In what direction and at what speed? 20 light years is nothing if it comes towards us at fast speed. It won't be here tomorrow, but still. According to the legends, "Nibiru" passes by every 25,000 years or so, causing earthquakes and floods? This object is almost 13,000 times bigger than Earth, and it creates huge auroras without the help of a sun. Amazing!



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 08:48 PM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
a reply to: Riffrafter

Its The Greatship!



Since the beginning of the universe, the giant starship wandered the emptiest reaches of space, without crew or course, much less any clear purpose. But humans found the relic outside the Milky Way, and after taking possession, they named their prize the Great Ship and embarked on a bold voyage through the galaxy’s civilized hearts.

Larger than worlds, the Great Ship is laced with caverns and oceans, scenes of exalted beauty and corners where no creature has ever stood. Habitats can be created for every intelligent species, provided that the passengers can pay for the honor of a berth, and the human captains make the rules and dispense the justice in what soon becomes thousands of alien species joined a wild, unpredictable journey.





That quote you posted reminds me an awful lot of "Rendezvous With Rama" by Arthur C. Clarke. Great book! Now I have to get my hands on "The Great Ship".

Thanks for the snippet and info!



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 09:18 PM
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a reply to: Hellmutt

It's not headed for us.


It belongs to the spectral class T2.5 and its position shifts due to its proper motion annually by about 1.24 arcsec with a position angle of about 90°.
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 10:02 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Hellmutt

It's not headed for us.


It belongs to the spectral class T2.5 and its position shifts due to its proper motion annually by about 1.24 arcsec with a position angle of about 90°.
en.wikipedia.org...


Phage - what does that mean - "it's position shifts"?

Is it referring to the planet's trajectory, travel path, position relative to something else?

I knew I would need to remember what an arcsecond was at some point in my life...damn. More reading ahead....



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 10:41 PM
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If a star dies, wouldn't the planets go flying away until another sun captures them, eventually? This could be one that lost its home star.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 12:15 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust
If a star dies, wouldn't the planets go flying away until another sun captures them, eventually? This could be one that lost its home star.
Theoretically it is said that stars collapse into dwarf stars, neutron stars or black holes. When they die they don't disappear as most of the mass remains even after a supernova. So you could say that the death of a star is the birth of a black hole, or a dwarf star.

I don't think collapsed stars can radiate off their energy to zero but there is a theory of black holes doing something like that, Hawkins Radiation. I would imagine that it would take a while for a black hole to radiate its energy away, if it's even possible, but theoretically, maybe after that any planets that might have survived could go rogue.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 01:16 AM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

If you do any kind of star gazing you can see there are other planets in our solar system,plus can see the star system looking like it's headed our way,and that can only spell disaster



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 02:00 AM
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a reply to: Devino


Wow...that's a pretty involved process. I thought as the Sun "died" over time, it's gravitational pull weakened, allowing planets to spin out and away into interstellar space.

You're saying that the gravity-well remains, even if the Star becomes a dwarf or Black hole. Fascinating.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 02:26 AM
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If this is a planet and has a magnetic field than it would have an active core. Isn't an active core the result of gravitational pull from nearby neighbors ie planets and a parent star?



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 05:36 AM
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originally posted by: Alien Abduct
a reply to: Riffrafter

It says in the article that the object is 200 million years old. How do they know how old it is?

It says on Wikipedia that this planet seems to be a member of the Carina-Near stellar moving group, which is itself around 200 million years old.


Groups of similarly aged stars moving together through space are considered prime regions to search for free-floating planetary like objects, because they provide the only means of age-dating these cold and isolated worlds. Knowing the age, as well as the temperature, of a free-floating object like this is necessary to determine its mass.


www.sciencedaily.com...



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 05:39 AM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
phys.org...


New evidence that all stars are born in pairs


That's some mighty mitosis if you ask me.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 06:03 AM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

that fighter is too far out to have gotten lost from his fleet !

wait thats not a planet its a space statioN!



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 06:14 AM
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a reply to: w810i

as far as I understand it , the active core is not what creates the magnetosphere , simply the precursor material in order to create one , the charge is given to the planet by the parent star!

as it passes through its heliosphere !

What is likely is that this planet was torn from its solar system during a galactic merger and thrown into interstellar space as a result ! Like the white ball being hit off the table

it has however kept its magnetosphere unlike mars



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 06:27 AM
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a reply to: sapien82

There seem to be a few ideas as to what cause a magnetosphere.

One idea is that the object in question was hit hard by something big which caused it to produce it's magnetosphere.

It is one idea how the Earth got hit by the moon which triggered ours.

Just one of many.



posted on Aug, 7 2018 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

Twenty lights years away? unless this star's first name is death then I wouldn't be too worried, there are a few stars whose gravitational pull could affect this rogue planets trajectory, and if that fails we can always aim at it's exhaust port and fire some proton torpedoes.

And before you ask it's not impossible; I used to bulleye womprats in my T-16 back home.




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