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Huge "rogue" planet discovered roaming aimlessly outside our solar system

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posted on Aug, 8 2018 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

From the OP's second link:


Both its mass and the enormous strength of its magnetic field challenge what scientists know about the variety of astronomical objects found in the depths of space.


It's always exciting when the experts are baffled!

Great find and thanks for sharing.




posted on Aug, 8 2018 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: Th3HitmaN

the likely scenario was when two systems / galaxies cross paths and either merge or one engulfs the other , ripping systems apart though gravitational maelstrom !

the planet in question having been ejected from its host star and thrown into interstellar space to wander rogue !



posted on Aug, 8 2018 @ 09:26 AM
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a reply to: DividedByZero

I think the strength of its magnetic field and its mass are puzzling the scientists because its an artificially generated mass and magnetosphere!

Its a space station !



posted on Aug, 8 2018 @ 01:42 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Devino
Currents can and do form as a result of the ionization of the upper atmosphere by sunlight. Solar particles are not required.
Photoionization, I hadn't considered that. Do you think this has an affect on the currents that were discussed in this paper? Defining and resolving current systems in geospace
Those were the currents I was referring to.

I did a search for photoionization in geospace and nothing came up except a brief definition. I would be interested in learning more.


You seemed to be implying that currents in the solar wind cause the Earth's magnetic field. They don't.
Close but not quite. If the solar wind caused magnetic fields then why doesn't Venus have one, or Mars? I am implying that the solar wind might be an important factor in Earth's magnetic field.

When I first heard that the 3 meter goedynamo experiment had produced a magnetic field I was excited, I thought they finally proved the geodynamo theory. I was rather disappointed to learn that they did so by introducing a magnetic field using an electromagnet. Could this be similar to what takes place with the Earth? I wonder what results the sodium dynamo experiment would yield inside a terrella.



posted on Aug, 8 2018 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: sapien82
Possible name for the planet

RONIN - Japanese for "wave man"

Term for samurai who had no lord …….



posted on Aug, 8 2018 @ 09:37 PM
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originally posted by: KevinKaboom

originally posted by: ZombieZygote

originally posted by: Alien Abduct
a reply to: Riffrafter

It says in the article that the object is 200 million years old. How do they know how old it is?


They'll just throw out some scientific sounding jargon that nobody can possibly verify, and state it as fact. Standard operating procedure.


Just because you're ignorant about how science works doesn't make it false.

Educate yourself before spouting off foolish comments.


Charming. 🙄

What I stated is fact. Are YOU personally able to verify this? Are any of the fancy tools and instruments used to allegedly verify this available for non-corrupted, non-funding dependant free thinkers? No? Alrighty then.

My point stands.



posted on Aug, 9 2018 @ 03:05 AM
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originally posted by: ZombieZygote

originally posted by: Alien Abduct
a reply to: Riffrafter

It says in the article that the object is 200 million years old. How do they know how old it is?


They'll just throw out some scientific sounding jargon that nobody can possibly verify, and state it as fact. Standard operating procedure.

I'm a bit perplexed how you got 17 stars for that off-the-cuff reply that just shows ignorance. Seems like there's a lot of "free thinkers" lurking out here, and by "free" I mean free of common sence and desire or ability to investigate.

A little Google search allowed me to answer Alien Abduct's question, so problem. The existence of the Carina-Near moving group of stars (where this rogue planet was found) can be verified by lots of observatories around the world.

If you have a distrust of what the stronomers say, why don't you become one (with all the education and expertise it requires) and then blow the lid off for us if you find any lies or discrepancies in what they tell us.

edit on 9-8-2018 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2018 @ 07:32 AM
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a reply to: ZombieZygote

I think its alot easier to call bull# on something you dont understand than it is to take the time and research it find the truth of the matter yourself !

Personal incredulity is no excuse !

I see this all the time , people say oh , they spout of this and that as fact , and we have to accept it as fact !

No you dont , if you choose not to accept it then go and find the truth of the matter yourself !

Dont pass it off as BS , because you are too lazy to find the truth !

Its so easy for people to dismiss science , like its a religion
when people of today have zero attention span , want everything handed to them on a plate
cant be arsed to read a book or two and would rather just dismiss scientific understanding as towing the party line.
The science you speak of is a foundation of collective human knowledge!

We stand on the shoulders of giants !



posted on Aug, 9 2018 @ 03:02 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: ZombieZygote
They'll just throw out some scientific sounding jargon that nobody can possibly verify, and state it as fact. Standard operating procedure.

I'm a bit perplexed how you got 17 stars for that off-the-cuff reply that just shows ignorance. Seems like there's a lot of "free thinkers" lurking out here, and by "free" I mean free of common sence and desire or ability to investigate
ATS can be a very strange place. Personally I was excited to be a part of a thread that was front page, for a while, that wasn't about politics. Felt like old times.

Thank you Riffrafter!



posted on Aug, 10 2018 @ 07:17 AM
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a reply to: firerescue

Id defo be up for that !

Ronin then the date it was discovered Ronin2016



posted on Aug, 10 2018 @ 08:10 AM
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Nice NASA investigation into some of the magentospheres of our solar system
with nice videos!

NASA investigates Magnetospheres

Im going with the molten moving core of the earth was ready and waiting for another electro magnet "the Sun"
to hit it with some passing electrical current and thus start its own magnetic field system


edit on 10-8-2018 by sapien82 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2018 @ 11:36 AM
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I'm a bit perplexed how you got 17 stars for that off-the-cuff reply that just shows ignorance


Some members of this forum have MILLIONS of stars, so they are meaningless anyway.



posted on Aug, 10 2018 @ 12:11 PM
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originally posted by: Mogget

I'm a bit perplexed how you got 17 stars for that off-the-cuff reply that just shows ignorance


Some members of this forum have MILLIONS of stars, so they are meaningless anyway.


Member stars are meaningless for just that reason.

But post stars are not.

They tell other members that there was something about the post that the reader either liked or agreed with and it was therefore worth reading. Well, mostly I think...



posted on Aug, 10 2018 @ 12:26 PM
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So, are you saying that the number of stars displayed to the lower left has nothing whatsoever to do with the number of post stars that have been awarded??
edit on 10-8-2018 by Mogget because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 10 2018 @ 05:01 PM
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Drawing a rogue planet makes it real!



posted on Aug, 14 2018 @ 04:46 PM
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originally posted by: Alien Abduct
a reply to: Riffrafter

It says in the article that the object is 200 million years old. How do they know how old it is?


Atomic spectral lines. They can figure out the emissions spectra of the planet from the telescope observations. These can be matched to isotopes of atoms in molecules. These will match some pattern or ratio, so they can tell from half-life analysis how old the planet is.



posted on Aug, 14 2018 @ 10:30 PM
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originally posted by: stormcell

originally posted by: Alien Abduct
a reply to: Riffrafter

It says in the article that the object is 200 million years old. How do they know how old it is?


Atomic spectral lines. They can figure out the emissions spectra of the planet from the telescope observations. These can be matched to isotopes of atoms in molecules. These will match some pattern or ratio, so they can tell from half-life analysis how old the planet is.

That's not the case with exoplanets, though. Their age is estimated from the age of the host star or (in this case) the age of the group or cluster of stars it's associated with. This rogue planet is associated with the Carina-Near moving group of stars, which is approximately 200 million years old.

It is thought that all stars and their planets in such groups or clusters form around the same time.
edit on 14-8-2018 by wildespace because: (no reason given)




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