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China has reportedly tested a Mach 6 Waverider

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posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 07:33 AM
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There's not a lot of information available about the Chinese test. No pix. Not a lot of detail on the vehicle itself. However, what we do know is...concerning.

The Starry Night 2 vehicle is a wedge shaped, wave rider. It was accelerated by a solid rocket to hypersonic speeds and flew over 6 minutes at Mach 5.5 and ultimately reached Mach 6. There it supposedly conducted some maneuvers. The shortest possible distance it covered at speed was 792 miles and possibly up to (but not likely) 864 miles.

There is no information about how long it was about Mach 5 before the test completed. That it accelerated after reaching Mach 5.5 would suggest a powered flight rather than a boost glide. There is no word on what powered the vehicle at hypersonic speeds: was it a conventional rocket? Was it a scramjet?

The length of time at speed would suggest they are hitting the same 7 minute issue we have/had.

www.flightglobal.com...




posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 07:36 AM
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a reply to: anzha

What is “wave rider” tech?

EDIT. I just looked up the Boeing X-51. Very interesting indeed and kinda scary and cool at the same time.


edit on 2/19/2013 by Allaroundyou because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: Allaroundyou

Wave rider: uses its own shockwave to produce lift at hypersonic speeds.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: anzha

Isn't that kinda the same thing the XB-70 did? Only at lower speeds



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 09:53 AM
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a reply to: hawkguy

There is an enormous difference between mach 3 and mach 6. The x-15 did similar speeds at the same time frame as the b-70 but it came back melted.

Iirc, the b-70 was not a waverider.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 10:19 AM
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a reply to: hawkguy

Yes. It's also referred to as compression lift. The XB-70 was very carefully designed to use it, which is why it had the movable wingtips.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 10:24 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Interesting. I stand corrected.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 10:29 AM
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a reply to: anzha
So essentially what they already did four years ago or something?
Looks like they're waiting for the US to come up with a solution.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 10:35 AM
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a reply to: anzha

The two are used as if they're separate terms, but they're not. One just sounds a hell of a lot cooler.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I heard of compression lift before but thought waveriding was something they figured out in the 80s when hydrodynamic simulations became more practical.

As they say, til.
edit on 6-8-2018 by anzha because: Fixed mobile typing



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 11:26 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

One of the perks of being in Ohio is being able to see the XB-70 at the Air force museum at Wright Pat. Don't get many spooky aircraft flying overhead, but we do get to look at the spooky aircraft of the past.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: hawkguy
a reply to: Zaphod58

One of the perks of being in Ohio is being able to see the XB-70 at the Air force museum at Wright Pat. Don't get many spooky aircraft flying overhead, but we do get to look at the spooky aircraft of the past.


Fact. I’m sitting in a hotel in Dayton this second, about to head back for day two at the museum. This is my first time here. The 15 hour drive from Florida was absolutely worth it. The XB-70 took my breath away. I got a photo of it with the YF-12 and Tacit Blue peeking into the frame. Building Four was worth the drive by itself.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: anzha

It became more practical in the 80s because of that. Before that the XB-70 was the only even semi successful platform to use it.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: sqd5driver

My trip there they had moved it and several others into the new building, which opened the following week. I caught the aft end peeking out though. For me, the memorial garden was the best part of the museum.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 05:24 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: sqd5driver

My trip there they had moved it and several others into the new building, which opened the following week. I caught the aft end peeking out though. For me, the memorial garden was the best part of the museum.


FACT.

I’m usually a very stoic guy. It takes a lot to shake me. The memorial garden was beautiful. Watching my 2 year old daughter run through it was particularly moving. Then we went inside and as I was taking it all in, I realized I was standing in front of Bockscar. First time I’ve ever teared up in a museum...

Then I got to tell my stepson about the time my grandfather torpedoed a Right Whale off the coast of Georgia (he thought it was a U Boat) and the mood was instantly lifted.

Getting to see airplanes I’ve read about for 20+ years was huge. And I may or may not have taken a photo accidentally touching Tacit Blue’s nose.

This place is like Mecca for aviation nerds.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: sqd5driver

The Doolittle raiders display always makes me tear up. I remember when a lot more goblets were upright.


My dad used to take me when I was very little every year. It was a bit over an hour in his prized Porsche. Shame he had to sell it before I could drive. Crazy how as I matured what interested me would change. Always something new to see there



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 07:02 PM
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originally posted by: anzha
There's not a lot of information available about the Chinese test. No pix. Not a lot of detail on the vehicle itself. However, what we do know is...concerning.

The Starry Night 2 vehicle is a wedge shaped, wave rider. It was accelerated by a solid rocket to hypersonic speeds and flew over 6 minutes at Mach 5.5 and ultimately reached Mach 6. There it supposedly conducted some maneuvers. The shortest possible distance it covered at speed was 792 miles and possibly up to (but not likely) 864 miles.

There is no information about how long it was about Mach 5 before the test completed. That it accelerated after reaching Mach 5.5 would suggest a powered flight rather than a boost glide. There is no word on what powered the vehicle at hypersonic speeds: was it a conventional rocket? Was it a scramjet?

The length of time at speed would suggest they are hitting the same 7 minute issue we have/had.

www.flightglobal.com...

I was reading up on Waverider tech back in the '90s and got my knuckles rapped because I had read some stuff that was supposed to be classified, but wasn't.

I wonder what the strategic implications are if they have found a way to deal with the heat?



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 07:06 PM
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a reply to: sqd5driver

See the spaceshuttle in a museam. That'll tear you up. I did when I walked into the room the spaceshuttle is held at in the low angeles science museam. To stand less than ten feet away from her. It's very moving.



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: anzha

Article with video: Asia Times link



posted on Aug, 6 2018 @ 07:10 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Depends on what the design is for. The SR-71 which was slower was an incredible strategic asset and extremely valuable.



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