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Restaurant bites back when customer video shows worm in fish

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posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 01:26 AM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy

originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: angeldoll
....I didn't think they were supposed to do this. A restaurant here was once temporarily shut down because they "scraped the worms out and served them".

I like to go deep sea fishing, and afterwards have the fish cleaned and wrapped. If they find worms, they bring it out and show it to you, and ask you if you still want it. You don't.

(ewe, I wonder if they keep the fish, scrap the worms out and sell it to restaurants. I know sometimes when I didn't want a fish (just didn't like it) and one of the deck hands would ask if they could have it (to sell). Hm.


If you cook the fish well, those worms die. Freezing the fish also kills them. It's strange that they do not tell a person that when they process the fish.





Parasites become a concern when consumers eat raw or lightly preserved fish such as sashimi, sushi, ceviche, and gravlax. When preparing these products, use commercially frozen fish. Alternatively, freeze the fish to an internal temperature of -4°F for at least 7 days to kill any parasites that may be present. Home freezers are usually between 0°F and 10°F and may not be cold enough to kill the parasites.

www.seafoodhealthfacts.org...

They don't mention the tumors they find in cows or many other things either. Think burger it is legal to grind those things for burger.





Ugh, puss burger mmmmm yummy




posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 01:39 AM
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Excuse me while I exude a vomitfall from my mouth.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 01:57 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Having worked in the commercial fishing industry for better part of two decades, I can safely say that there is no way in God's wet oceans that all parasitic worms, and their eggs, are caught during processing. It simply is not possible. Generally, the freezing process kills them, as they can't, by industry standards, be packaged at less than minus 10 degrees F.

The cod in most restaurants are usually Pacific, or Gray, Cod--though Atlantic Cod appear as well. It depends upon the restaurant and how much they want to pay. Pacific Cod are cheaper, or were, when I worked in the industry. Odds are very good, that that cod was fresh packaged--though I've no way of knowing, of course.

Pacific cod are nasty fish. You've not lived until you deal with a boat load of poorly iced Pac. Cod. Urrrgh... They're also scavengers. Most of your white fish, though not all, are also bottom dwellers. Flounder. Halibut. etc...

That lovely fresh halibut steak you just payed 15.00/lbs to buy? Odds are very good, virtually 100 percent, that they, too, have those same parasitic worms. Which is why you don't eat 'em raw. You cook 'em.

I have to call shenanigans, on this. The likelihood of a worm surviving the processing process, and getting cooked is pretty low. Not impossible, but unlikely.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 02:07 AM
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a reply to: vonclod

Got news for you...

Halibut have 'em, too. Not as many, but they're generally bigger. Given that halibut are rather large fish, it's almost impossible to find and remove 'em.

White fish like halibut and cod, add pollock into that, too, when filleted at a plant are candled. Candling is the use of a backlight shining through the filet to show the parasites, bones, eggs, etc... Over a certain threshhold, the filet is discarded to be ground, and dried into fish meal for fertilizer, and pet food, processors. Below that threshhold, the bones, eggs, and worms are removed and the filet moves on in the process.

The thicker the filet, the less likely it is that the worms and assorted other things will be found and removed.

That's why, in many cases, halibut over a certain weight will be automatically graded down to #2, or even #3, quality...the bigger the fish, the older it is, and more likely to be infested to an alarming degree sometimes.

Cook your fish thoroughly.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 02:13 AM
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a reply to: vonclod

Guaranteed.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 02:14 AM
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...and y'all really don't wanna know what goes into fishsticks. Oh, no, you do not.




posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 03:11 AM
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To be honest, there's too much complaining going on. Have people nothing better to do than complain, complain, complain? Social media seems designed to rob people of their ability to address issues, and makes people incapable of dealing with issues sociably, and with intelligence.

Whatever happened to having a "quite word" with the manager to address a problem? Oh no, it's all out with the public shaming and accusations. Smug ignorance is the worst kind of ignorance.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 03:36 AM
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m.facebook.com...

Local Mickey Ds



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 03:50 AM
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a reply to: seagull


Oh dear. I like fishsticks. Our chickens love them too. Do tell?



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 03:57 AM
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originally posted by: paraphi
To be honest, there's too much complaining going on. Have people nothing better to do than complain, complain, complain? Social media seems designed to rob people of their ability to address issues, and makes people incapable of dealing with issues sociably, and with intelligence.

Whatever happened to having a "quite word" with the manager to address a problem? Oh no, it's all out with the public shaming and accusations. Smug ignorance is the worst kind of ignorance.




One day when you go out and eat, then get sick because of something like this you will likely reconsider your stance....



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 03:59 AM
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a reply to: paraphi


Agreed. You only need to look on TripAdvisor where you always get a few tossers giving bad reviews. We have been to some apartments in Greece which are lovely, been several times now which is unusual for us to go back to the same place. A recent review complained about the pool being concrete with no tiles. Which is just untrue, it is a lovely pool. This sort of thing affects people's livelihoods.

We once stayed at Keith Floyd's old place in Devon - the Maltsters Arms - and one review complained about a run of gloss paint behind a radiator!

Some people, eh?



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 05:34 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Where i would normally agree with you, i saw a story a few days ago about 42,000 year old worms frozen in permafrost were thawed and came back to life...

Here it is

Ironically, they are a species of roundworm.
edit on 1/8/2018 by Brian4real because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 07:06 AM
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originally posted by: Guyfriday
Well on the good side of things, then, every city needs a crap-hole place to eat so that people can say; "no, no, not THAT place, I know a good place to eat". Looks like this is just one of THOSE places.


It's a shame because Asbury Park has really changed its perception and is now one of the better spots on the Jersey shore. Too much competition to be serving gruel.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 07:07 AM
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originally posted by: Lightdhype
Hey Augustus, I'd like to take this off topic moment to randomly ask you if you ever met or worked with Anthony Bourdain back in the day?


Met several times and dined at his place when he was the chef. Cool dude, you would have liked him.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 07:10 AM
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a reply to: seagull


Yeah, not a fan of hake, haddock, pollock or cod. You know what I'm referring to specifically since you did this for a living.

Give me tuna all day long or some other oily fish that doesn't eat other fish's crap.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 07:11 AM
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originally posted by: Brian4real
Where i would normally agree with you, i saw a story a few days ago about 42,000 year old worms frozen in permafrost were thawed and came back to life...

Here it is

Ironically, they are a species of roundworm.


Not sure if those spent there life cycle inside another animals flesh like these do. I'd have to look into it more. I can tell you that these die fairly quickly once they are removed from the host fish.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 08:32 AM
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originally posted by: Lysergic
Excuse me while I exude a vomitfall from my mouth.


pics or it didn't happen.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 09:21 AM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy

originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: angeldoll
....I didn't think they were supposed to do this. A restaurant here was once temporarily shut down because they "scraped the worms out and served them".

I like to go deep sea fishing, and afterwards have the fish cleaned and wrapped. If they find worms, they bring it out and show it to you, and ask you if you still want it. You don't.

(ewe, I wonder if they keep the fish, scrap the worms out and sell it to restaurants. I know sometimes when I didn't want a fish (just didn't like it) and one of the deck hands would ask if they could have it (to sell). Hm.


If you cook the fish well, those worms die. Freezing the fish also kills them. It's strange that they do not tell a person that when they process the fish.





Parasites become a concern when consumers eat raw or lightly preserved fish such as sashimi, sushi, ceviche, and gravlax. When preparing these products, use commercially frozen fish. Alternatively, freeze the fish to an internal temperature of -4°F for at least 7 days to kill any parasites that may be present. Home freezers are usually between 0°F and 10°F and may not be cold enough to kill the parasites.

www.seafoodhealthfacts.org...

They don't mention the tumors they find in cows or many other things either. Think burger it is legal to grind those things for burger.


That was a very good article, it was easy to read and still effectively showed important information. I bookmarked it because I just learned this stuff, it is nice to have a good article to present to people. I tried to tell my granddaughter that frozen fish was better for sushi, she says no and does not approve of the regulations recently passed that require flash freezing of the tuna. She eats sushi a couple of times a month, I hope she does not have a problem with parasites, she does not listen to reason. I will give her a copy of that article. It is a short article, so I will not waste too much money giving it to her, she will not even consider anything that does not fit her beliefs in something like this until she gets badly sick. She finally listens to me about diet influence on asthma and the balsam of Peru or Euginol intolerance effect on us.

I am kind of loosing my patients with the young not listening to reason and observing moderation.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 09:24 AM
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originally posted by: Brian4real
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Where i would normally agree with you, i saw a story a few days ago about 42,000 year old worms frozen in permafrost were thawed and came back to life...

Here it is

Ironically, they are a species of roundworm.


If a worm is frozen in a slow manner, allowing for dehydration to take effect, that worm can survive. If it is quickly frozen it kills the worms, the worm does not have a chance to excrete the water from it's cells and the cells kind of pop. So how something is frozen is actually important.



posted on Aug, 1 2018 @ 01:35 PM
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That's why most, if not all by now, fish are what's called IQF frozen. Stands for Instant Quick Freeze. Filets such as the cod we're speaking of, are placed on trays between layers of plastic, and rolled into a blast freezer that runs at -50 degrees F, or thereabouts, takes about 10-20 minutes to freeze, but the trick is not to freeze 'em too long or the product get dried out and the quality rapidly declines.

There are other things that have to be factored in, as well, for the sake of quality... It's sometimes a bit tricky trying to balance speed and quality. Especially when you're the quality control guy (me), getting yelled at by the production guys because I won't let 'em start early, or hold frozen product in warm air. It can get loud!



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