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Restaurant bites back when customer video shows worm in fish

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posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: interupt42

Hate those types of fish a bugger to fillet and those spines If you get spiked by one of them the wound always went a bit puss filled and gammy.
You know what thinking back I really enjoyed being a Fishmonger some fish are a joy to butcher, money was great but I stank like fish all the time no matter how many times I washed the fish oil/sweat would be absorbed into my skin and after a hour of dancing the night away and I sweated I stank like a mackerel.
I also kept on finding huge scales which had stuck to my skin which I enjoyed peeling off lol.
Too old now it was a young mans game bloody hard work...loved it though I used to fillet tuna
.




posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Pollock is good, and still fairly cheap.

It's the fish ingredient in imitation crab and lobster.



posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: testingtesting

LOL, sounds like a stinky business.

So how realistic or full of BS are those fishing shows are on tv like wicked tuna and deadliest catch.



posted on Aug, 2 2018 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: seagull




It's the fish ingredient in imitation crab and lobster

Not sure I will be eating those either after your description, lol



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 12:20 AM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: rickymouse

Pollock is good, and still fairly cheap.

It's the fish ingredient in imitation crab and lobster.


I like the dish with imitation crab at the chinese restaurants. I learned it was pollock a long time ago, that is why the imitation crab is good. I don't mind crab but I like the imitation better. I often wonder what they use to make it rubbery, I don't think I want to know, that is one of my favorite chinese dishes.

I have about three bags of IQF Polloxk in my freezer. I buy that when it goes on sale for under two bucks a pound, I sometimes have seven or eight pounds in stock.
edit on 3-8-2018 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 12:46 AM
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a reply to: dug88

Every fishery that processes cod fillets knows they are loaded with parasites, and always have been.
Staff with ultraviolet lights, magnifiers and tweezers process every fillet that they sell. It is a fact, and has been since colonial days. (Of course they did not have the UV lights then, but did it out in sunlight).

A fish fact , like it or not.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 02:00 AM
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originally posted by: charlyv
a reply to: dug88

Every fishery that processes cod fillets knows they are loaded with parasites, and always have been.
Staff with ultraviolet lights, magnifiers and tweezers process every fillet that they sell. It is a fact, and has been since colonial days. (Of course they did not have the UV lights then, but did it out in sunlight).

A fish fact , like it or not.




That was not the right thing for me to read before I eat my dinner, or at least try,

edit on 3-8-2018 by hopenotfeariswhatweneed because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 03:47 AM
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a reply to: interupt42

Deadliest Catch? Spot on. Wicked Tuna? No idea, though it, too, probably is as well.

I, at one time or another, knew many of the skippers and older crew on many of those boats that were shown on Deadliest Catch.

It's called deadliest for a reason. I've quit counting the number of friends and drinkin' buddies who went out, and never came back. A short mayday, and the Coasties, bless those kids, would only find scattered debris in the waves of the Bering Sea.

You'll never hear me complain, ever, about the Coast Guard. They'll kill themselves trying to get to you if you need 'em. Every single one of 'em. ...and they have.

If ever you have the opportunity to go to Dutch Harbor, or Kodiak, visit the memorials. That's one of the other prices paid for our cod and salmon. That's why you'll never hear me complain that the fishermen make too much money. They can be, and many of 'em are, POS's. Several of those skippers, and I, are not what you'd call friends...
But I'd never begrudge them a cent of what they make.

I've worked the boats, worked the docks, loaded the (then) Soviet, and Polish, as well as Korean and Japanese freighters, and fought and argued with buyers. Looking back at it from a distance of almost 20 years, I wouldn't trade it for anything. Some of the work was dangerous, there's a reason I have the knees of a 90 year old (sixteen knee procedures, and counting...), a bad shoulder, and various aches and pains. ...and have a lot of missing friends. But, again, wouldn't change a thing except maybe go right from High school, rather than waste two almost three years in college.

But anyway, more of an answer than you probably wanted...
. But it's nice, every now and then, to have a chance to remember and tell some of the stories. Some of 'em might even be true...



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 03:58 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

The process is actually rather neat...

It takes about one hour from the moment the fish is fileted, to when it comes out the back side as surimi, to be frozen, then packaged for shipping to the final processing where it's turned into crab and lobster.

It's rinsed, and bleached, though actual bleach isn't used of course, until it's white, then a mixture of sugar, and various other ingredients are added, then it's tumbled and squeezed to get as much moisture out as possible, then packaged, frozen, packed for shipping, then warehoused 'til it's shipped, usually between 3-4 days ideally, but weather/prices play a roll as you might imagine.

I had an opportunity, which I didn't take, to my regret, to work on a Japanese owned factory trawler that processed pollock into surimi, then into the crab and lobster... Lot's of money, but working for the Japanese, especially that older generation at that time, wasn't a whole lot of fun...big time cultural and "other" issues. I had no use for it. Now? Should have manned up for a four month contract, who knows what might have come of it.

Again, probably too much info that y'all don't need, nor want...



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 04:01 AM
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a reply to: seagull

I always dreamt of going over and learning their fishmonger ways.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 04:07 AM
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a reply to: testingtesting

Missed this post...

Oh, yes, the joys of hand butchering. Some, like halibut, cod, pollock, and salmon are easy. Either by hand, or by machine.

But snapper and the like? Uggghh... It'd take hours to do 10,000 lbs--all hand butchered. In the 80's and early 90's, the machines weren't near as good as they are now.

When I first started, the fishermen got twice the money per pound from some processors, if you brought the fish in already headed. Then all that was needed was the bloodline cleaned out. Easy. ...and more importantly, faster. Processing, speed is all. As I'm sure you recall.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 04:21 AM
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a reply to: testingtesting

From what I saw, and that wasn't very much, it's much the same.

One summer, I got to work with the technicians that dealt with the salmon roe. I was the quality control liaison. Despite not speaking a lick of Japanese--though by the end of the summer, I could swear rather fluently. Talk about a bunch of dirty ol' men...sweet Poseidon.

Salmon roe was, and is, a very serious business. A wooden box, hand nailed, 8 inches by 10 inches, and 3 inches deep--if I'm remembering it correctly, holds approx. 500 dollars US worth of salted roe. A tall-boy reefer van held @one million US--again, if I'm remembering right.

One of the funniest things, well it was to me, I ever saw, was when one of the truck drivers for some odd reason parked a loaded reefer on a loosely packed parking area without using blocks to spread the weight. Yeah, I think y'all know where this story is going...One of the legs sank into the ground, and the reefer went over. The previous night, a freighter had dropped off a brand new Suzuki Samurai, and it was parked right beside the reefer... Oops. Squashed it flatter then a pancake... 8 people lost their jobs that day. The truck driver. His boss, who was my boss. The warehouse supervisor-I got that job. The dock foreman, and for some odd reason four of the Japanese techs...never did find out what that was all about. One million dollars loss. Phew...bad tempers for days.

The funny thing was the samurais alarm couldn't be shut off, it sounded for almost 5 hours...drove us nuts.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 04:26 AM
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originally posted by: testingtesting
a reply to: seagull

I always dreamt of going over and learning their fishmonger ways.





posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 07:15 AM
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a reply to: seagull




You'll never hear me complain, ever, about the Coast Guard. They'll kill themselves trying to get to you if you need 'em. Every single one of 'em. ...and they have.


When my son was 6 years old he would say when he grows up he wants to be a batman paramedic coastguard diver.

Funny thing is that i would have no problem being in the coastguard myself , but him being in the coastguard scares the Sh1t out of me. Its amazing how you care about those little buggers more than yourself.




Some of the work was dangerous, there's a reason I have the knees of a 90 year old (sixteen knee procedures, and counting...), a bad shoulder, and various aches and pains. ...and have a lot of missing friends.


Ok so no batman paramedic coastguard diver fisherman for him. LOL




But anyway, more of an answer than you probably wanted... . But it's nice, every now and then, to have a chance to remember and tell some of

Not at all , I appreciate listening to others experiences in life especially in areas I have none.






Some of 'em might even be true

LOL, here is a
edit on 16831America/ChicagoFri, 03 Aug 2018 07:16:15 -0500000000p3142 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 10:31 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: rickymouse

The process is actually rather neat...

It takes about one hour from the moment the fish is fileted, to when it comes out the back side as surimi, to be frozen, then packaged for shipping to the final processing where it's turned into crab and lobster.

It's rinsed, and bleached, though actual bleach isn't used of course, until it's white, then a mixture of sugar, and various other ingredients are added, then it's tumbled and squeezed to get as much moisture out as possible, then packaged, frozen, packed for shipping, then warehoused 'til it's shipped, usually between 3-4 days ideally, but weather/prices play a roll as you might imagine.

I had an opportunity, which I didn't take, to my regret, to work on a Japanese owned factory trawler that processed pollock into surimi, then into the crab and lobster... Lot's of money, but working for the Japanese, especially that older generation at that time, wasn't a whole lot of fun...big time cultural and "other" issues. I had no use for it. Now? Should have manned up for a four month contract, who knows what might have come of it.

Again, probably too much info that y'all don't need, nor want...



I have always had an interest in checking out how food is processed. I went to the salmon canning factory in Juneau for a tour with my mother and stepfather, that was really interesting. It was back in about seventy five, I assume it is different now. I also went to canning factories with my mother and father when I was a kid, visited stockyards to watch the process, and talk to butchers about cutting meats. I have a curiosity, it drives my wife nuts when I ask people about their work. People are usually happy to share what they know, it makes them feel good. No knowledge is wasted. I know a little about a lot of professions. but only a lot about maybe five professions. Most people think they know a lot if they worked at something for two months, that is just a little.
edit on 3-8-2018 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 10:56 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Not as familiar with the canning process for fish, though I know how, generally, it works, as I've canned my own fish, and venison.

It'd be a lot warmer!! Nothin' like working 15-18 hour days surrounded by sub-zero freezers... To this day, the soles of my feet are still partially numb from nerve damage. Never got frost bite, but border line for hours at a time, for months on end, add up.



posted on Aug, 3 2018 @ 11:18 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: rickymouse

Not as familiar with the canning process for fish, though I know how, generally, it works, as I've canned my own fish, and venison.

It'd be a lot warmer!! Nothin' like working 15-18 hour days surrounded by sub-zero freezers... To this day, the soles of my feet are still partially numb from nerve damage. Never got frost bite, but border line for hours at a time, for months on end, add up.
I worked outside a lot in the winter, I wonder if that had something to do with the bottom of my feet being numb?



posted on Aug, 4 2018 @ 12:05 AM
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a reply to: BotheLumberJack

That reminds me I'm going to goto a local Chinese restaurant later this week because I took a service user there and it was full of local Chinese students and I looked at the menu and they have a separate menu, there is an English Chinese bit with chicken chow mien etc on but the Chinese one has things like Pig maw in black fungus sauce....I fancy a bit of pig face
.
20 quid for a 50 item banquet
.




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