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Rare Cluster Of Ocular Melanoma Baffles Scientist

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posted on May, 3 2018 @ 01:35 PM
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Saw this on the news. Rare clusters of ocular melanoma. Curious about this. Has to be some factor that ties them all together
www.cnn.com...
edit on 5.3.2018 by Kandinsky because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 3 2018 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: HODOSKE

So what the heck does Auburn, Alabama and Huntsville, North Carolina have in common for those dates, and those individuals who have been affected? This is quite intriguing..



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 02:03 PM
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a reply to: HODOSKE

Probably all watched solar eclipse with imitation/fake solar glasses ..... just a thought



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: MetalThunder

someone else mentioned that also. Could be!



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 02:09 PM
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originally posted by: FamCore
a reply to: HODOSKE

So what the heck does Auburn, Alabama and Huntsville, North Carolina have in common for those dates, and those individuals who have been affected? This is quite intriguing..


There is a nuclear power plant in the Huntersville area, not sure about Auburn.



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 03:39 PM
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I am sure there is an environmental cofactor in this cancer. Identifying that could be difficult. There is a lot more than just the school to look at with this, they could have learned some habits or it could be a carcinogen in the environment of the whole area. I have a little round spot in my eye, it is my third eye, a piece of the cornea or something that I have always had as long as I know. There is a name for it, it looks like a moon orbiting my cornia.

But check out this condition, I wonder if I could talk to a person with Pupula Duplex without staring too much www.youtube.com...



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 04:25 PM
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and now we know how many put sunscreen in there eyes to see the eclips



posted on May, 3 2018 @ 06:38 PM
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Cooks deal with hot oils and microwave cookers. Kitchens will have those UV bug zappers. Steelworkers deal with glowing hot metals giving off heat. But the human eyeball has a tough outer coating so chemical contact seems unlikely. If it were something internal and in the bloodstream, the problems would built up in the retina layers. The university seems to be a big connection. Maybe somebody had a flaky fluorescent tube in a lab or corridor?

If it were radiation, then there would be tumours and cancers in all parts of the body. There have been clusters of leukemia in the UK due to proximity to megawatt radio broadcast towers.



posted on May, 4 2018 @ 09:17 AM
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none of those things cause cancer because the radiation they emit are non ionizing, it doesn't have enough energy to strip an electron off atoms.



posted on May, 4 2018 @ 10:35 AM
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a reply to: HODOSKE

The two most interesting and telling aspects of the situation, appear to be the specificity of the geographical relation between the victims, and the peculiar nature of the condition that the victims developed while in those locations.

Auburn Alabama and Huntsville North Carolina are more than 400 miles apart, and only 38 of the fifty people affected went to the University mentioned in the article. Thats a more than six hour drive, or just a tad over a three hour flight from one place to the other. If there was something in the water, it would have to be in all of the water between those two places, which would have yielded much more widespread contamination than we are seeing.

I believe that something must be happening in the Huntsville area and the Auburn area, that is not happening in places between these locations, in order to produce the particular victim pool that we are seeing here. What it is, I cannot say, because there is too little data to work from.

The real question is, what are the commonalities that link ALL victims, besides the condition they have developed? What ties these people together?



posted on May, 4 2018 @ 01:26 PM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: HODOSKE

The two most interesting and telling aspects of the situation, appear to be the specificity of the geographical relation between the victims, and the peculiar nature of the condition that the victims developed while in those locations.

Auburn Alabama and Huntsville North Carolina are more than 400 miles apart, and only 38 of the fifty people affected went to the University mentioned in the article. Thats a more than six hour drive, or just a tad over a three hour flight from one place to the other. If there was something in the water, it would have to be in all of the water between those two places, which would have yielded much more widespread contamination than we are seeing.

I believe that something must be happening in the Huntsville area and the Auburn area, that is not happening in places between these locations, in order to produce the particular victim pool that we are seeing here. What it is, I cannot say, because there is too little data to work from.

The real question is, what are the commonalities that link ALL victims, besides the condition they have developed? What ties these people together?


There was a spill of benzene decades ago:
www.al.com...



posted on May, 5 2018 @ 03:57 AM
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a reply to: stormcell

Aye, in Baldwin, right?

Thing is, Baldwin, assuming I have the right location on my map, is 662 miles from Huntsville. Not only that, but its closer to the coast than Auburn is by a good bit. The reason I mention this, is that water tends to flow toward the sea. I am more than willing to admit that I may not be aware of the latest understanding of geology, or the way in which groundwater moves from place to place, but it seems counter-intuitive that the spill of benzene would have flowed North and East, from Baldwin as far as Huntsville. Thats a HUGE distance for a material to travel subsurface, and against what appears to be the most sensible path of least resistance to the sea.

Thoughts? Anyone?




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