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Some news about dinosaur extinction

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posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 04:27 PM
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So, in my Forest wildlife class, my teacher briefly spoke about an article. It was revealing new hypothesis about the extinction of the giant lizards. He explained us that it was the combination of several factors. High volcanic activities and the accumulated dust in the atmosphere would have been the most important elements. He didn't go in details.

I've then decided to go check that myself and an article was in the home page of my browser which was talking just about that. It references a first study published in the magazine Nature February 5th. Three british searchers of Reading university claim that the dinosaur spread so much fast, that the biodiversity of their environments were threatened. But the article says that this theory is debated amongst the numerous searchers.

The second study is more focusing on the asteroid that fell 66 millions ago. Published last January in the scientific magazine Sciences Advances, it explains that the impact spot of the asteroid was the worst possible. Apart from the earthquake, a cloud of sulfur dioxide was formed and caused acid rains, which would have greatly impact the dinosaur. The authors of the study claim the impact have also awoken oceanic volcanoes across the world and lava has spread across the land.

Since the article is in french and that I seem unable to post the link of the exact article, but an interface, I'll post some English links about this:

www.sciencenewsforstudents.org...

www.history.com...

www.independent.co.uk...

www.theguardian.com...

Sorry for my English, I've probably made errors, I hope it is still understandable.




posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 04:30 PM
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a reply to: IgnorantGod

I read somewhere that there's a theory that some dinosaurs survived all the way until the the beginning of the Paleocene Epoch.
edit on 2/8/2018 by starwarsisreal because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 04:37 PM
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a reply to: IgnorantGod

There have been many extinction level events. NOVA has been running one recently, highly recommended, The Day The Dinosaurs Died.



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

Interesting, it's hard to put a definitive answer considering the time separating us. I do believe that several factors brought the extinction, and it's also safe to consider that some species have probably adapted to the situation. After all we have some species that hasn't change much since this era.



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 04:53 PM
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Birds are said to be the feathered dinos direct decendants,if true they didn`t all ever go extinct,just evolved.



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: IgnorantGod

Something that is weirdly left out of the whole dinosaur extinction event is the 66 million year old flood basalt eruption. I could certainly understand if the earth got smacked with a big enough meteor event on one side of the globe it could cause a leak on the other side.. There were other extinction events tied to the periodic eruptions of Flood Basalts the world over... Siberia (251 mya), India (66 mya ), and the Pacific North West, USA which buried 45 million acres in basalt to name just a few .... Some of these eruptions lasted over a millions of years and covered 1000s or square miles to a depth of several "MILES".. This was a big deal for life on planet earth.



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 05:07 PM
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a reply to: ridgerunner

In the early hours, I hear Pterosaurs.

At least that's what they sound like...



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 05:08 PM
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a reply to: IgnorantGod


Earth was not a fun place to be 66 million years ago. The end of Cretaceous period was a time of mass extinction: Approximately 75 percent of the planet’s plants and animals died off, an event arguably spurred by an unholy ripple effect ignited by an asteroid pummeling into the Yucatán Peninsula. Scientist increasingly agree that this impact accelerated catastrophic volcanic activity in India’s Deccan Traps, prompting massive eruptions for thousands of years, and ultimately ended the reign of the dinosaurs.

Inverse.com - Meteorite That Killed Dinosaurs Also Set off a Chain of Submarine Volcanoes.

There is another version in Science Advances, I think.

They ran around sampling gravitational anomalies on the ocean floor. Figure the Chicxulub impact created a wave that pulsed around the planet releasing tectonic plates, causing massive magma flow leading to volcanoes erupting on the other side of the world. That is wild idea!

The thousand years of eruption sounds rather scary.



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: IgnorantGod
So, in my Forest wildlife class, my teacher briefly spoke about an article. It was revealing new hypothesis about the extinction of the giant lizards.


They weren't lizards.


It references a first study published in the magazine Nature February 5th. Three british searchers of Reading university claim that the dinosaur spread so much fast, that the biodiversity of their environments were threatened. But the article says that this theory is debated amongst the numerous searchers.

Not widely accepted at this point. They lived for millions of years and they had a fairly diverse environment.


The second study is more focusing on the asteroid that fell 66 millions ago. Published last January in the scientific magazine Sciences Advances, it explains that the impact spot of the asteroid was the worst possible.


Check to see the authors' disciplines/specialists.

Paleontologists know that the non-avian dinosaurs were extinct before the asteroid hit. The avian ones (birds) survived, though.


[quote Apart from the earthquake, a cloud of sulfur dioxide was formed and caused acid rains, which would have greatly impact the dinosaur. The authors of the study claim the impact have also awoken oceanic volcanoes across the world and lava has spread across the land.
They may be talking about the Deccan Traps.



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 05:28 PM
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The thing that really killed the dinosaurs is they were cold blooded.
even with the meteor.and volcanos, and all that other stuff happening a lot of warm blooded species survived.
many small cold bloodied animals survived also, but being giants and cold blooded doomed the dinosaurs.



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 05:28 PM
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I have a hunch that the appearance of small egg-eating mammals may have been a factor.



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 05:48 PM
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a reply to: IgnorantGod

Know thy place?

The best we can ever do is theorise, we get snippets of time to look at. I'm not sure we'll ever truly know what wiped the dinosaurs out. Who's to say they ever were?

We all die, my body in 100,000 years time won't be evidence of human extinction. Now imagine muddying the waters because Homo Sapiens branched into 6 distinct species and another primate developed bipedal movement with opposable thumbs. Without DNA or enough fossils to establish some kind of genealogy we're only ever going to be theorising. We might just think they're all humans.

With dinosaurs it's a lot more theory than fact.

Which kind of brings me to adaption...

What is life?
I like to think it's just clever matter. DNA knows one fundamental thing, a thing the whole universe seemingly runs on. Convert energy into matter / convert matter into energy. We as life are like the catalysts of matter. To relate that to dinosaurs?

They had many pioneers in their ranks.

Think of it this way. Life needs energy and it seems when ever niches are filled they are filled quickly, with multiple lifeforms from various backgrounds developing to exploit the new wealth of energy.

This is why some species change, others don't.

Dinosaurs were extremely varied. Look for the pioneers, some of them left legacies. A theme I always notice with the extinct is "how?" or "why?" when ultimately I think the question should be "what?"

What causes the design of the extinct to become folly?

Evolution, not just life either.



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 05:50 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: IgnorantGod

There have been many extinction level events. NOVA has been running one recently, highly recommended, The Day The Dinosaurs Died.


Watched a couple days ago, recommended



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 06:08 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

How often does a life-ending event like that happen though?

How often is a lifeform utterly destroyed instantaneously?

Usually it's a case of clinical death and the slow process of officially being deceased throughout the body.

I'm not saying the dinosaurs didn't come to a quick untimely end but what I am saying is that having no more sauropods or tyrannosaurus isn't exactly evidence that they did.

We can't date dinosaur fossils to within 1000's of years. I mean I could equally say Where's all the megafauna gone? They're lost to a time they had a place, they've got living relatives though haven't they?

Earth has never been a fun place. If the living doesn't kill you the non-living eventually will. The dinosaurs simply couldn't hack it.



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 06:12 PM
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originally posted by: RAY1990
a reply to: IgnorantGod

Know thy place?

The best we can ever do is theorise, we get snippets of time to look at. I'm not sure we'll ever truly know what wiped the dinosaurs out. Who's to say they ever were?

We all die, my body in 100,000 years time won't be evidence of human extinction. Now imagine muddying the waters because Homo Sapiens branched into 6 distinct species and another primate developed bipedal movement with opposable thumbs. Without DNA or enough fossils to establish some kind of genealogy we're only ever going to be theorising. We might just think they're all humans.

With dinosaurs it's a lot more theory than fact.

Which kind of brings me to adaption...

What is life?
I like to think it's just clever matter. DNA knows one fundamental thing, a thing the whole universe seemingly runs on. Convert energy into matter / convert matter into energy. We as life are like the catalysts of matter. To relate that to dinosaurs?

They had many pioneers in their ranks.

Think of it this way. Life needs energy and it seems when ever niches are filled they are filled quickly, with multiple lifeforms from various backgrounds developing to exploit the new wealth of energy.

This is why some species change, others don't.

Dinosaurs were extremely varied. Look for the pioneers, some of them left legacies. A theme I always notice with the extinct is "how?" or "why?" when ultimately I think the question should be "what?"

What causes the design of the extinct to become folly?

Evolution, not just life either.


Only logged on to give ya a star .. excellent thread and your post are why I stay around here 😁



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: bluechevytree
The thing that really killed the dinosaurs is they were cold blooded.
even with the meteor.and volcanos, and all that other stuff happening a lot of warm blooded species survived.
many small cold bloodied animals survived also, but being giants and cold blooded doomed the dinosaurs.


That's not currently known to be a fact.

From a paper at Berkeley -


Top five current hypotheses

Dinosaurs were complete endotherms, just like birds, their descendants.

Some or all dinosaurs had some intermediate type of physiology between endothermy and ectothermy.

We know too little about dinosaurs to hazard a guess at what their physiology was like.

Dinosaurs were mostly inertial homeotherms; they were ectothermic but maintained a constant body temperature by growing large. Small dinosaurs were typical ectotherms, maybe with a slightly elevated metabolic rate.

All dinosaurs were simple ectotherms, enjoying the warm Mesozoic climate. But that's okay; many ectotherms are quite active, so dinosaurs could be active, too.


It's simply not known if they were cold or warm blooded.



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 06:44 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

There were what, 5, or 6, extinction level events.

The dinosaurs were kicking back, and if Ringo Star was correct, eating some "friendly" greens, then, PLOP! Giant space rock sets the earth to wiggling like a bowl full of Jello.
Volcanoes erupting for a thousand year... dogs and cats living together... mass hysteria!

We found two, space rocks passing within the orbit of the moon and earth just this week! A known one is about 1.5 LD away within the next couple days. Soon, there will be a Tesla Speedster cruising around the asteroid belt running into Oprah knows what...

The difference is, we know it is coming! It is just a matter of time. Which the universe has more of than I do. And I know that too.

The question then becomes, can we hack it before the next one shows up?



posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 06:44 PM
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Just because we are on a conspiracy site.

The dinosaurs lived and flourished at a time when Saturn was our sun and the earth was a orbiting satellite within the glow from that brown dwarf. Inside the glow/energy field would support life much better than our precarious position that we are in now.

Then all things changed and the period of time referred to the golden age or the time of eden was over.

/joking ... but not really


Recovering the Lost World,
A Saturnian Cosmology -- Jno Cook
Chapter 3: The Osiris Mystery.


saturniancosmology.org...




posted on Feb, 8 2018 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: IgnorantGod

The asteroid theory is the most commonly accepted as it occurred at the Cretaceous/tertiary boundary, dinosaurs present in the Cretaceous but there has never been one found that is past the Cretaceous period, approximately 64 million years ago. The Cretaceous/tertiary boundary also has tektites, irridium, nano diamonds and shocked quartz which are all indicators of an impact event. The crater has been identified off and on the Yucatán pennensula and has four concentric rings, indicative of the largest impact events observed on other planets. However, could some dinosaurs have survived? Sure, but there are no dinosaurs found yet after the Cretaceous period. The consensus in geology is that this impact event killed the dinosaurs, but do we truly know? The tertiary period is the rise of the mammals, ie us.


edit on 8-2-2018 by Joefoster because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2018 @ 01:27 AM
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a reply to: Blaine91555 it`s only not know by the experts,because they have no common sense, they are experts!



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